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From Northern Virginia. Hanover Junction, May 22. --Grant commenced swinging his columns around on our right on Friday. Yesterday morning Grant's force ocGrant's force occupied Milford Station and Bowling Green. Yesterday evening, about dark, Gen. Wilcox, in front of Spotsylvania Court House, threw forward a portion of his force entered the enemy's breastworks, and found them held by a line of skirmishers, Grant's whole army being rapidly in motion on our right flank. This necessitated couthe abandonment of the battle ground in front of Spotsylvania Court House. Grant seems to be manœuvering for a position nearer Richmond. The enemy are repoHanover Junction, May 23. --The latest information represents the bulk of Grant's army near Milford Depot and Bowling Green, with pickets some five or six mile The impression here is that there is no chance of an immediate collision. Grant will probably require some time in order to get ready to move upon us. All
the result is as follows: On the 4th May, Grant crossed the river with 140,000 men. On the 5thhe 7th, Sunday, the 8th, and Monday, the 9th. Grant made repeated and furious assaults upon Lee's eliberation. The carnage continued for hours, Grant continually ordering up fresh troops as fast acorrespondent of the New York Herald estimates Grant's loss on this occasion at from 18,000 to 25,0 reload their guns after they had fired them. Grant made the poor wretches drunk, and then goaded spirits had evidently been completely broken. Grant boasted that he meant to fight it out on that the enemy's having abandoned his, boasted that Grant had driven Lee out of his last fortification. Yet Lee was in the rear of Grant the whole time. Grant endeavors to console himself for his uGrant endeavors to console himself for his unheard-of losses by saying that our losses are still heavier. Gen. Lee has received the reports ofinally existing has almost been overcome. Grant thanks God for his failures. He has much to b[3 more...]
ce to remain there for the present. The report is repeated that they are leaving that scene of operations, and crossing James river for the purpose of reinforcing Grant; but of this there is no confirmation. It is true, however, that the whole campaign on the Southside has been a disastrous one to the enemy, whose plans have been, and seek to aid the grand Army of the Potomac in its approach to Richmond, the robbing of Butler's laurels being a small matter in comparison with the success of Grant, who is just now the deity of the Yankee nation. Still there may be more bloody work on the Southside, and the present may be the calm that precedes the storm. there is no event incident worth mentioning in that carter. By changing his line of operations Gen. Lee has lost nothing, the movement having been necessitated by Grant's change base, his object being to keep the enemy fill in his front. An officer who left the yesterday represents that our troops are in fine condition, in the
From General Lee's army. [from our own correspondent.] Army of Northern Virginia, Near Spotsylvania C. H., May 26th, 1864. Grant has shown no signs of advance for the past two days. He is doubtless biding his time till the reinforcements, of which Meade speaks so confidently, shall have arrived. Meantime, for the sevente atmosphere is fully impregnated with the stench arising from portions of the battle-field over which I have passed, and which is in close proximity to our lines. Grant, in every instance, has left his dead unburied, and his wounded uncared for, whilst nearly all of our stain have been buried and our wounded well treated. GraGrant seems to be still moving around towards our right. As I predicted in a previous letter, he will do nothing just yet but will wait until his armies are recruited, his commissariat supplied, and his medical chests renewed; then doubtless with all haste another Hecatomb of victims "butchered to make a Lincoln holiday." Our lo
The Daily Dispatch: May 24, 1864., [Electronic resource], Army of Northern Virginia, near Hanover Junction, May 22, 1864 (search)
g, as if quite refreshed by their short naps. Of course there was some straggling, from the forced character of our marches, but not a great many. Rumors say Grant has cut loose from Fredericksburg, and will make Tappahannock and Port Royal his depots for supplies. I cannot think that we are in immediate danger of a collision, for the reason that Grant's men must be considerably exhausted and he himself will require a few days at least to recruit and get his men in fighting plight. I will make no speculations as to the future, or what Grant will do. My own opinion, however, is, that he is a desperately bold man, and will give the Army of Northerneast to recruit and get his men in fighting plight. I will make no speculations as to the future, or what Grant will do. My own opinion, however, is, that he is a desperately bold man, and will give the Army of Northern Virginia full work during the coming campaign.--That our final success is certain, I have an abiding faith. X.
ven if they possess the means. "Ah!" said one, as he eat heartily of the private stores of one of our officers, "you Yankees don't know what privation means." Grant's losses. The "Tribune" correspondent says that in the first six days of the series of battles Gen. Grant has been fighting, he lost 40,000 men, nearly all of Gen. Grant has been fighting, he lost 40,000 men, nearly all of whom are killed and wounded, but few prisoners being taken. Yet the Seven Days battles, which were called disastrous, left McClellan within half the distance of Richmond, as compared with Grant's position at last accounts. This fact would seem to prove that the Peninsula route must have some advantages as compared with the overlGrant's position at last accounts. This fact would seem to prove that the Peninsula route must have some advantages as compared with the overland route, President Lincoln's 'plan' to the contrary. The War in Arkansas. The Arkansas correspondent of the New York "Times," under date of May 6th, makes the following candid admission: It is not too much to say that Steele's movements so far have been a complete failure — a disastrous one, barely saved from being