Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: July 28, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Grant or search for Grant in all documents.

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The War news. It is more than probable that Grant is making preparations for that "brilliant move" which we have been so often assured he had in contemplation, and which a Northern paper of thehat a large portion of the Yankee army has crossed to this side. It would appear from this that Grant has come once more to try his luck in the swamps of the fatal Chickahominy, and that once more he, beyond the Appomattox that the Yankee nation was getting tired of it. More blood is wanted by Grant's masters, and he is about to yield to the demand. The armies in Georgia. In another porhe death of Major General McPherson (who won all the victories ever won by the Yankee army under Grant) is confirmed, and will prove a serious blow to the enemy's operations in Georgia. McPherson was the ruling adviser with Sherman, as he had been with Grant, and was possessed of great caution and much ability. He is the man who has led all the flank movements which have resulted in the flanki
ying any respect to either friend or foe. A large steam distillery, about a mile and a half from Williamsport, belonging to Mrs Dahl, was fired by the rebels and consumed. The establishment had not been in operation for some time. From Grant's army. A letter, dated at Grant's headquarters on the 21st, says: Rebel deserters coming into our lines on Sunday night concurred in stating that preparations were being made by the enemy for a grand attack our lines yesterday morningGrant's headquarters on the 21st, says: Rebel deserters coming into our lines on Sunday night concurred in stating that preparations were being made by the enemy for a grand attack our lines yesterday morning, for some unknown reason the attack was not made, and the hopes of our brave boys were doomed to a disappointment. The intelligence of an anticipated attack found us prepared at every point, and had the enemy been rash enough to assault our lines he would have met with a reception he little dreamed of A monster mortar, weighing ever 7,000 pounds, and vomiting a 200 pound shell, 13 inches in diameter, introduced itself to the Johnnies in the rebel Fort Archer, over the Appomattox, yester
Yankee prisoners. --The following prisoners, captured from Grant's army on this side of the James, were brought to this city and committed to the Libby yesterday afternoon: First Lieut H M Munsell, member of co C, 99th Penn reg't, captured at Turkey Bend; 2d Lieut R W Walker, co A, 34th Massachusetts infantry, and fourteen Yankee privates. Among the number was one taken by our pickets at Chaffin's Bluff.
From Petersburg. Petersburg, July 26. --To day (the forty second of the siege) was decidedly the most quiet of the campaign. There was scarcely any picket firing, and not more than one or two discharges of artillery. [Second Dispatch.] Petersburg, July 27. --The prediction of the Philadelphia Inquirer, of the 22d, seems likely to be realized soon on the north bank of James river. Hancock's second corps, which was in our front a few days ago, has gone there and perhaps other Yankee forces. An engagement occurred there to-day, but full particulars have not transpired. The 19th corps of the Yankee army front at Bermuda Hundred. In front of this place all is comparatively quiet, though Grant is still digging. A citizen of California was sent into our lines under flag of truce yesterday on private business.