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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
s salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike elsewhere. Morning finds us on the right. Breckinridge turns the Federal left—we cut them off from Chattanooga. Astride the road we save the day till Liddell can be brought up and Graves has fallen in our midst, and bending over him, Breckinridge laments his loss. Around him lie Brocard and Bayle, and Reichert, and Duggan, and Stakeman, and Greenwood and Woods, with shattered carriages and crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
s salute them as they reach there. We strike at Glass's Mill, and plunging through the Chickamauga, leave on its banks a holocaust of dead. 'Tis Blair meeting a fate he had just predicted, and Morel, and Anderson, and Belsom, and Bailey and Daigle! We laid them shrouded in their blankets, and move to strike elsewhere. Morning finds us on the right. Breckinridge turns the Federal left—we cut them off from Chattanooga. Astride the road we save the day till Liddell can be brought up and Graves has fallen in our midst, and bending over him, Breckinridge laments his loss. Around him lie Brocard and Bayle, and Reichert, and Duggan, and Stakeman, and Greenwood and Woods, with shattered carriages and crushed guns that show what fire we took unflinchingly, while pouring canister alone upon their charging lines. Breckinridge thanks us on the field. To replace Blair, Vaught now stands promoted, and Chickamauga's victory led us but to Missionary Ridge. Dissensions and rivalries have br
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Address before the Virginia division of Army of Northern Virginia, at their reunion on the evening of October 21, 1886. (search)
s instructions, and to organize them into regiments or battalions, uniting as far as possible companies from the same sections of the State. Records War of Rebellion, Volume II, page 787. Colonel Jackson arrived at Harper's Ferry on Monday, the 29th, and relieved General Harper of command the next day, the 30th. On his arrival, he found assembled at Harper's Ferry two thousand one hundred Virginia troops, with four hundred Kentuckians, consisting of Imboden's, Rogers's, Alburtes's, and Graves's batteries of field artillery, with fifteen guns of the highest calibre; eight companies of cavalry, without drill or battalion organization, and nearly without arms, and a number of companies of infantry, of which three regiments, the Second, Fifth and Tenth, were partially organized, while the rest had no organization. There was no general staff, no hospital nor ordnance department, and scarcely six rounds of ammunition to the man. Dabney's Life of Jackson, pages 188, 189. It was out
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
one of the Monument, 207; On presenting Col. Anderson, 302. Edgington, Major T. B., Address of, The Race Problem, 21. Eller, Hon. W. H., On the Growth of the Free-Soil Idea, 429. F Company Association, 285, 289. Farmers' Alliance, 286. Fergusson, General, 76. Field, Rev. Dr. H. M., On General Lee, 342. Fifteenth Amendment, Inadequacy of the, 21. First Va. Regiment, Casualties in the, at the Battle of Gettysburg, 407. Flags. Historic, 288, 400. Floral Decoration of Graves, 22. Florida, Acquisition of, 434. Ford, Surgeon, DeSaussure, 76. Forts, in defence of Savannah, 71, 74, 76, 78, 79; Hell and Damnation. Foster, General, 79. Fredericksburg, Campaigns about, in 1862 and 1864, 236 329. Free Soil Idea in the United States, Development of the, 429. Frobel, Col. B. W, 70, 79. G Company, 3d Va. Battalion, 284. Gaines' Mill, Battle of, 55. Garibaldi, 53. Georgia Infantry, 12th. Papers relating to the, 160; organization of, 161; in bat
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 18. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Southern Historical Society Papers. (search)
his home in Louisville, with the earnest purpose to confine himself exclusively to his profession, for he was, to use his own energetic expression, steeped in poverty to the very lips. But, like many others, the fascinations of public life proved too strong for him, and he again plunged into politics with his accustomed ardor. He was successful in his candidature, and twice represented the city of Louisville in the legislature of Kentucky. In 1837 he made the race for Congress against Mr. Graves, the regular nominee of the Whig party. The congressional district being a Whig stronghold, stood staunchly by the regular candidate, and Mr. Marshall was defeated by almost two thousand majority. He was deeply disappointed and did not attempt to conceal the bitterness of his feelings. As he said, the iron entered into his soul. He left Louisville immediately and returned to his old home in Versailles. During the ensuing year he announced himself as a candidate for the legislature fro
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.12 (search)
assed through a fiery furnace, with honor untarnished, makes us uncover our heads with a reverence to a people who sacrificed so much to create a nation that perished in its infancy. How can the South forget, when her destruction and her ruins are ever before her eyes? When on the hillsides rest the cemeteries filled with loved ones from every hearthstone? Is there a single family that did not lose one member? How few there are that lost only one. The gray blends not with the blue, Graves sever them in twain. A grateful government has collected the bones of her soldiers, and placed them in splendid national cemeteries; 275,000 of 359,528 men who died for it, lie buried beneath the sod of the South. I honor a people who have thus honored those who died for them. But while this is the case, the comrades and descendants of those who fell on the Confederate side of the War between the States, would be cravens if they forgot the tender memories of the dead and buried past.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 21. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.15 (search)
ttle it could command. Behind its guns rallied the remnants of Adams' Brigade; behind it formed the lines of Liddell to stem the overwhelming pressure of the foe, and until the line was made strong enough to advance, the Fifth Company held the ground as ordered by Breckinridge, unmindful of enormous opposing guns, devoting its canister and shots alone to the enemy's infantry, hurling it back as it charged time and again. Six men killed and fourteen wounded, with ten slaughtered horses, and Graves, the battalion major, lay around its guns when it ceased firing to let Liddell pass to the front in a charge that drove the foe back to where Breckinridge had pushed before. Then, with crippled carriages bearing its dead and wounded, the Fifth Company was withdrawn to where Bridges' captured guns stood, and stripped them and others to be fit, and soon it reported back to enter the fray again. Many other episodes at Jackson, Missionary Ridge, Resaca, Kennesaw Ridge and other fields might
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 29. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.52 (search)
surgeon. George, William O., lieutenant. Goulden, James, sergeant. Goulden William. Grant, James H., lieutenant. Grubbs, P. W., lieutenant. Gregory, John M., captain. Gwynn, Walter, captain; major-general Virginia troops. Graves, Bat. Graves, William. Haskins, Richard O., lieutenant; known as colonel. Hastings, Samuel, corporal. Hatcher, Benjamin, corporal. Higgins, John O., corporal. Haines, William. Hancock, Frank. Hill, Charles B. Hodges, AGraves, William. Haskins, Richard O., lieutenant; known as colonel. Hastings, Samuel, corporal. Hatcher, Benjamin, corporal. Higgins, John O., corporal. Haines, William. Hancock, Frank. Hill, Charles B. Hodges, Alvis. Hodges, Alpheus. Hubard William J.; sculptor. Hurt, William S. Harrison, William M., lieutenant. Haxall, Bolling W. Hobson, John D. Jarvis, Augustus, sergeant. Johnson, Dr. Carter, surgeon. Johnson, Thomas Tinsley, corporal. Johnston, Peyton, corporal. Kelley, M. Lawson, Peter. Lay, John O. Luck, C. B. Lumpkin, William L. Lumpkin, Robert. Mayo, Joseph, captain; known as the Mayor. May, James. McCance, Thomas W. Macmurdo, John R.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Fighting that was close by us. (search)
ts of the heavy battle of Drewry's Bluff, and show that he is right in his declaration that it was fought on May 16th, 1864. On pages 200-201 of the volume above referred to General Beauregard's circular order of battle for the 16th of May is quoted in his report of the engagement, and on page 205 appears the list of causualties in Ransom's, Hokes', and Colquitt's Divisions. Ransom's Division, commanded by Major General Robert Ransom, was composed of Barton's Brigade, under Col. D. B. Fry; Graves' Brigade, under Brigadier-General Gracie; Kemper's Brigade, under Col. William R. Terry, of the Twenty-fourth Virginia Infantry; Hoke's old Brigade under Lieutenant-Colonel (afterwards Brigadier-General) Lewis, and a battalion of artillery, under Lieutenant-Colonel Lightfoot. The casualties in all of these commands appear, except in Kemper's Brigade. On the next day, May 17th, 1864, Kemper's Brigade was transferred to Hoke's Division in exchange. Bushrod Johnson's Brigade, and Kemper'
b. letter cutter, h. Garden court. Gilbert, Henry, b. merchant, h. Summer. Giles, John B., marble worker, h. Cambridge. Gilman, Charles E., town clerk, h. Walnut. Glines, Jacob T., brickmaker, Derby. Goodhue, Homer, supervisor, McLean Asylum. Goodnow, John, b. merchant at E. F. Cutter's. Goodhue, Thomas F. H., market, h. Bow. Gooding, Samuel H., b. brass founder, h. Joy. Gray, John, carpenter, h. Broadway. Gray, George W., b. architect, boards with John Gray. Graves, William E., teacher, Court from Elm. Griggs, Charles, b. liquor dealer, h. Laurel. Griffin, Ebenezer K., teamster, h. Cambridge. Griffin, Theophilus, teamster, h. Bow. Griffin, Gilman, carpenter, h. Broadway. Guild, Chester, b. tanner and leather dealer, h. Perkins. Guild, Chester, Jr., accountant, h. Perkins. Guild, George A., accountant h. Perkins. Hadley, George W., wharfinger, h. Hamlet. Hadley, Benjamin, teamster, h. Cambridge. Hadley, Mrs. Martha, widow,
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