hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge sketches (ed. Estelle M. H. Merrill) 21 1 Browse Search
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition 16 2 Browse Search
The Cambridge of eighteen hundred and ninety-six: a picture of the city and its industries fifty years after its incorporation (ed. Arthur Gilman) 14 2 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 12 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 8 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Irene E. Jerome., In a fair country 7 1 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 3 1 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition. You can also browse the collection for Asa Gray or search for Asa Gray in all documents.

Your search returned 9 results in 5 document sections:

Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 13: 1846: Aet. 39. (search)
, of whom my uncle will no doubt have given you news, since I wrote to him. Obliged to continue my road in order to join Mr. Gray at Princeton I stopped but one day in New York, the greater part of which I passed with Mr. Redfield, author of a paper iate type between the primitive fishes of the ancient deposits and the more regular forms of the jurassic deposits. Mr. Asa Gray, professor of botany at Cambridge, near Boston, had offered to accompany me on my journey to Washington. We were to mn tropical regions, the collections of birds and mammals, which fell to the charge of Mr. Peale, are less considerable. Mr. Gray tells me, however, that the botanical collections are very large. More precious, perhaps, than all the collections are t would be safest to send them to the care of Auguste Mayor. At Philadelphia I separated from my traveling companion, Mr. Gray, who was obliged to return to his home. From Philadelphia, Mr. Haldeman and Mr. Lea accompanied me to Bristol, where Mr
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 14: 1846-1847: Aet. 39-40. (search)
working up the articulates of the Wilkes Expedition. Wyman, recently made professor at Cambridge, is an excellent comparative anatomist, and the author of several papers on the organization of fishes. . . . The botanists are less numerous, but Asa Gray and Dr. Torrey are known wherever the study of botany is pursued. Gray, with his indefatigable zeal, will gain upon his competitors. . . . The geologists and mineralogists form the most numerous class among the savans of the country. The fact Gray, with his indefatigable zeal, will gain upon his competitors. . . . The geologists and mineralogists form the most numerous class among the savans of the country. The fact that every state has its corps of official geologists has tended to develop study in this direction to the detriment of other branches, and will later, I fear, tend to the detriment of science itself; for the utilitarian tendency thus impressed on the work of American geologists will retard their progress. With us, on the contrary, researches of this kind constantly tend to assume a more and more scientific character. Still, the body of American geologists forms, as a whole, a most respectable
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 15: 1847-1850: Aet. 40-43. (search)
He could hardly have come to Harvard at a more auspicious moment, so far as his social and personal relations were concerned. The college was then on a smaller scale than now, but upon its list of professors were names which would have given distinction to any university. In letters, there were Longfellow and Lowell, and Felton, the genial Greek scholar, of whom Longfellow himself wrote, In Attica thy birthplace should have been. In science, there were Peirce, the mathematician, and Dr. Asa Gray, then just installed at the Botanical Garden, and Jeffries Wyman, the comparative anatomist, appointed at about the same time with Agassiz himself. To these we might almost add, as influencing the scientific character of Harvard, Dr. Bache, the Superintendent of the Coast Survey, and Charles Henry Davis, the head of the Nautical Almanac, since the kindly presence of the former was constantly invoked as friend and counselor in the scientific departments, while the latter had his residence
Elizabeth Cary Agassiz, Louis Agassiz: his life and correspondence, third edition, Chapter 21: 1865-1868: Aet. 58-61. (search)
o the latest geological catastrophes. As you have seen so many North American Indians, you will be able to give interesting explanations of their somatic relations to the South American Indians. Why could you not send me, as secretary of the mathematical and physical section, a short report of your principal results? It would then be printed in the report of our meetings, which, as the forerunner of other publications, could hardly fail to be agreeable to you. You no doubt see our friend Asa Gray occasionally. Remember me cordially to him, and tell him I look eagerly for an answer to my last letter. The year ‘sixty-six has taken from us many eminent botanists, Gusone, Mettenius, Von Schlechtendal, and Fresenius. I hear but rarely from our excellent friend Alexander Braun. He does not resist the approach of old age so well as you, my dear friend. You are still the active naturalist, fresh and well preserved, to judge by your photograph. Thank you for it; I send mine in return.
2; advance, 294, 352, 365; Hugi's cabin, 294; of the Aar, 298, 317, 319, 349, 357, 364, 396; in the winter, 317; the Rosenlaui, 317; boring, 321; glacier wells, 322; caves of the Viescher, 324; capillary fissures, 351; formation of crevasses, 353; sundials, 355; topographical survey, 355; stratification of neve , 357; new work, 364. Glaciers in Strait of Magellan, 720, 721, 723, 733, 742, 744, 746, 747, 751, 756. Glen Roy, roads of, 308. Goeppingen, 49. Gould, A. A., 436, 466. Gray, Asa, 415, 421, 437, 458, 643. Gray, Francis C., 534; leaves a sum to found a Museum of Comparative Zoology, 559. Gray, William, 559. Greenough, H., 561. Gressly, A., 653. Griffith, Dr., collection of, 419. Grindelwald, 305. Gruithuisen, 44. Guvot, Arnold, 290, 291, 460, 478, 773; on Agassaiz's views, 372. H. Hagen, H. A., 679. 684. Haldeman, S. S., 423, 436. Hall, J., 437. Harbor deposits, 649, 654, 650, 651, 655. Hare, 419. Harvard University, 457, 617, 619, 6