Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Horace Greeley or search for Horace Greeley in all documents.

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ry — a short, plump oily little man in black, with a keen black eye, a Jew face, a yellow skin, curly black hair, closely trimmed black whiskers, and a ponderous gold watch-chain — in the north-west room of the United States Custom House. Over the door of this room were the words, State Department, and round its walls were hung a few maps and battle-plans. In one corner was a tier of shelves filled with books, among which I noticed Headley's, History, Lossing's Pictorial, Parton's Butler, Greeley's American conflict, a set of Frank Moore's Rebellion record, and a dozen numbers and several bound volumes of the Atlantic Monthly, and in the centre of the apartment was a black-walnut table, covered with green cloth, and filled with a multitude of state papers. At this table sat the Secretary. He rose as we entered, and, as Judge Ould introduced us, took our hands, and said: I am glad, very glad, to meet you, gentlemen. I have read your note, and --bowing to me--the open letter
the Northern papers an account of another conference on the subject of peace, which took place in Canada, at about the same date, between Messrs. C. C. Clay and J. P. Holcombe, Confederate citizens of the highest character and position, and Mr. Horace Greeley, of New York, acting with authority of President Lincoln. It is deemed not improper to inform you that Messrs. Clay and Holcombe, although enjoying in an eminent degree the confidence and esteem of the President, were strictly accurate in their statement that they were without any authority from this Government to treat with that of the United States on any subject whatever. We had no knowledge of their conference with Mr. Greeley, nor of their proposed visit to Washington, till we saw the newspaper publications. A significant confirmation of the truth of the statement of Messrs. Gilmore and Jaques, that they came as messengers from Mr. Lincoln, is to be found in the fact that the views of Mr. Lincoln, as stated by them to t
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 92. the Niagara peace conference. (search)
ery respectfully, Geo. N. Saunders. To Hon. Horace Greeley. Niagara Falls, N. Y., July 17, 1864. o at the earliest moment. Yours truly, Horace Greeley. To Messrs. C. C. Clay, G. H. Holcomb, Clidable on my part, I remain, yours truly, Horace Greeley. To Hon. Messrs. Clay and J. P. Holcomb, e letter of Messrs. Holcomb and Clay to Hon. Horace Greeley, and to that gentleman has been transmiriginal letter held by me to deliver to Hon. Horace Greeley, and which duplicate I now forward to t, for negotiation unconditionally, and that Mr. Greeley will be pleased to receive any answer we maediary through whom our correspondence with Mr. Greeley has been conducted, and assuring you that wcorrespondence between George Saunders and Horace Greeley. Statement of Horace Greeley. Mr. GrHorace Greeley. Mr. Greeley in the Independent of July twenty-sixth, 1864, gives the following account of his negotiation:Mr. Greeley in the Independent of July twenty-sixth, 1864, gives the following account of his negotiation: * * * In the other effort for peace I was a participant, as follows: Some time since it was [6 more...]