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Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 13: England.—June, 1838, to March, 1839.—Age, 27-28. (search)
; and made similar efforts for Richard Hildreth's Archy Moore, and Sparks's Washington. He purchased books for the Harvard Law School, and for Judge Story, Professor Greenleaf, and Luther S. Cushing; and caused copies of original manuscripts of Lord Hale and Hargrave to be made for the judge. His interest in the peculiar toils anory of lawyers, judges, law-writers, law-books, and courts; to Hillard of scholars, society, and personal experiences; and with less frequency and detail to Professor Greenleaf, Felton, Cleveland, Longfellow, Dr. Lieber, Mr. Daveis, and a few others. These letters were written with no view to publication or even preservation, but e, p. 198. Such thoughts appear in letters to Judge Story, Aug. 18, 1838; Dr. Lieber, Nov. 16 and Dec. 13, 1838; Hillard, Dec. 11, 1838, March 13, 1839; and Professor Greenleaf, Jan. 21, 1839. To Mr. Daveis he wrote, Dec. 6:— I begin to think of home and my profession. Tell me, as my friend, what are my chances at home.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 14: first weeks in London.—June and July, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
Longfellow for his capital letter, which by good luck stayed behind; also Lawrence, for his hearty, friendly lines; and Greenleaf for his lamentation over the changing spirit of the times. I shall write them all in due time; but at present my hands you about the Law Magazine and Hayward, whom I know intimately. He is a curious fellow, of much talent. To Professor Simon Greenleaf, Cambridge. Travellers' Club, In Pall Mall; founded soon after 1814 specially for the convenience of Englishm I have much to say on that subject. But how can I write it all? Affectionate recollections to Dane Hall, and to Mrs. Greenleaf and all your family, and to yourself. Chas. Sumner. To George S. Hillard. London, July 3, 1838. my dear Hillawith the most entire frankness; for to whom should I pour out my heart if not to you? You may show this to Hillard and Greenleaf; but I doubt if any stranger would not think this narrative a tissue of vanity instead of the offering of affectionate
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 1, Chapter 15: the Circuits.—Visits in England and Scotland.—August to October, 1838.—age, 27. (search)
. I pour out my heart to my friends, and I doubt not I shall have their sympathy. I should be glad to have Cleveland, Felton, Cushing, Longfellow, Lawrence, and Greenleaf see my letters, if they care about it. All this, however, I confide to your discretion. Perhaps you will not hear from me again for a month; for I am going noHappy at once and miserable, we Seem to partake the fate of Niobe; For, perishing by Chantrey's dart, we die, And in his marble live immortally.<] To Professor Simon Greenleaf, Cambridge. Holkham House, Nov. 2, 1888. My dear Greenleaf,—Which is the older of the two,—--you or I? There cannot be much disparity of age, I feelGreenleaf,—Which is the older of the two,—--you or I? There cannot be much disparity of age, I feel; for you write so freshly as to respond to all the little of youth there is left in me, or I have grown so grave as to be climbing prematurely to the dignity of your years. But time has moved faster with me, since I left your planet. I certainly can hardly make up my mind, or find voice or even pen-strokes, to call you ‘Mr.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 16: events at home.—Letters of friends.—December, 1837, to March, 1839.—Age 26-28. (search)
rising. The Law School numbered seventy pupils; and Professor Greenleaf, sole instructor when Judge Story was absent on judithe Political Ethics. Motley was writing Morton's Hope. Greenleaf was gathering the materials for a treatise upon The Law o and kept him in faithful remembrance. Mrs. Story and Mrs. Greenleaf regarded him like an absent son; and the wives of othember Four, in book-making, in society, and at Cambridge. Greenleaf wrote of the Law School and of politics. Story wrote of of improvement. Dr. Lieber wrote, Oct. 9, 1838:— Greenleaf runs up and down the coast of the Atlantic like an anxiouobably enjoyed by any American since time began. Professor Greenleaf wrote, Sept. 7, 1838:— It is a long time since I Jan., 1839, Judge Story said in conversation that he and Greenleaf should try to have Sumner in the Law School soon after hihe desired to have Sumner and Hillard succeed himself and Greenleaf. Again, Jan. 18, 1839:— When you ask me if we d<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 17: London again.—characters of judges.—Oxford.—Cambridge— November and December, 1838.—Age, 27. (search)
ay that I now know nearly all, and with many have contracted relations of intimacy and familiarity which I have not with any member of the bar in America (except Greenleaf), between whom and myself there is the same disparity of age. All the serjeants and Queen's counsel I know; but of this hereafter. Mr. Burge has sent me his worice and the gravity of his manner, and the generous feeling with which he castigates every thing departing from the strictest line of right conduct, remind me of Greenleaf more than of any other man I have ever known. I wish you could have listened to Lord D., as I did on the circuit, when he sentenced some of the vicious and profso to meet Lord Durham. I shall, however, see the latter before I leave. I am sorry that I cannot write by this steamer to Longfellow, whose letter I have, and Greenleaf's also, and Felton's. As ever, yours affectionately, Charles Sumner. P. S. You may receive this on my birthday. To George S. Hillard. Milton Park, D
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Athenaeum Club, Dec. 14, 1838. (search)
ly petty, did that tempest strife at your last election seem! I saw the various summonses to party meetings, and the split in the ranks of the Whigs, occasioned by Mr. Bond. Reference to a controversy in the nomination of members of the Legislature, which grew out of legislation on the liquor question. I could hardly believe that honest men, of elevated views, could have taken the smallest interest in such affairs. Tom Thumb's pint-pot always seemed larger than the stage of these transactions does to me at this distance, amidst the world-absorbing affairs which occupy the great metropolis. I am obliged, on account of my Cambridge engagements, to lose a most interesting dinner to meet Fonblanque, Black, and all the liberal press gang; also to meet Lord Durham. I shall, however, see the latter before I leave. I am sorry that I cannot write by this steamer to Longfellow, whose letter I have, and Greenleaf's also, and Felton's. As ever, yours affectionately, Charles Sumner.
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 18: Stratford-on-avon.—Warwick.—London.—Characters of judges and lawyers.—authors.—society.—January, 1839, to March, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
r and all the family. Ever your affectionate brother, Chas. To Professor Simon Greenleaf, Cambridge. London, Jan. 21, 1839. dear Greenleaf,—Your good longGreenleaf,—Your good long letter, and Mrs. Greenleaf's enclosed, came in due season. You know how thankful I am to hear of you and from you, and how I rejoice that the Law School still flouMrs. Greenleaf's enclosed, came in due season. You know how thankful I am to hear of you and from you, and how I rejoice that the Law School still flourishes as it should, under the auspices of my friends. Often my heart untravelled fondly turns to those old haunts. How will they seem on my return? How will all me subject of it. While with him I mentioned that I had a learned friend, Professor Greenleaf, who was engaged on a work on the Law of Evidence. Mr. Wills at once as work on the principles of the law of evidence. I at once told him that Professor Greenleaf had such a one in preparation. Mr. Burge told me to encourage you to th preface,—a preface full of warm admiration of the author. Kind regards to Mrs. Greenleaf, and thanks for her letter. Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. <
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 19: Paris again.—March to April, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
aris. Nor was the praise bestowed upon it confined to the Americans. Avowedly temperate in its tone and candid in its manner of handling the subject, it received the approbation of liberal Englishmen. The British ambassador at Paris, Lord Granville, spoke of it in decided terms of commendation. . . . In conclusion, allow me, sir, as an individual citizen, to express my obligations to Mr. Sumner for the worthy use which in this and other ways he has made of his residence abroad. Professor Greenleaf wrote, May 17:— I ran my eye rapidly over your article on the North-eastern Boundary in Galignani's Messenger. The impression it gave me was delightful. They ought at least to give you a secretaryship of legation for it. Governor Everett wrote, May 20:— I am greatly indebted for the paper containing your admirable article on the North-eastern Boundary. Hillard wrote, May 24:— Your article does you great credit. . . . Its tone and spirit are just what they o<
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 20: Italy.—May to September, 1839.—Age, 28. (search)
When you hear from me again,—or, rather, when I hear from you,—I shall be among the Tedeschi lurchi,as Dante calls the children of the Black Forest. Good-by. Success be with you! Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. To Professor Simon Greenleaf. Convent of Palazzuola, July 27, 1839. my dear friend,—I wrote you once, I think, from the palace of an English Bishop: this will go to you from a monastery of Franciscans. In Rome, the heat is intense; and the fever-laden airs of lways interested myself as much as I was allowed to, from the moment in which I had any education myself. I feel anxious to be at home, that I may take upon myself the responsibility which belongs to me as the eldest brother. Remember me to Mrs. Greenleaf, and believe me Ever affectionately yours, Charles Sumner. P. S. Rome, July 28.—I have just received a long letter from my brother George, who has penetrated the interior of Russia, Tartary, Circassia, Bithynia, and is now going to
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2, Chapter 22: England again, and the voyage home.—March 17 to May 3, 1840. —Age 29. (search)
ethinkers of their time,—drawing their inspirations from Jeremy Bentham. Their fearlessness in speculations on the problems of society and government harmonized with tne natural tendency of Sumner's mind. While the favorits pupil of Story and Greenleaf, he was yet at no time of their strongly conservative type of thought; and he returned from Europe more than ever a doctrinaire. Letters. To George S. Hillard, Boston. London, March 18, 1840. dear Hillard,—Which will reach you five to my friends. Have been much disappointed at not finding your brother here. Be on the lookout for me. The Mediator sails fast. I am coming. Love to all, and good-by. As ever, affectionately yours, C. S. P. S. Tell the Judge, and Greenleaf, and Fletcher, I am coming. Tell Ticknor I am his debtor for an interesting letter received at Heidelberg. To Judge Story. London, March 24, 1840. dear Judge,—I shall be on our side of the Atlantic soon,—very soon— perhaps as soon as
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