Browsing named entities in General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War. You can also browse the collection for Gregg or search for Gregg in all documents.

Your search returned 28 results in 3 document sections:

General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
on. In the mean time, Lieutenant-General Pemberton had ordered Gregg's brigade coming from Port Hudson to Raymond, and W. H. T. Walker's join him there. On the 12th, McPherson with his corps encountered Gregg near Raymond, and drove him back, after a spirited resistance, cons effects were trifling, on the numbers as well as on the spirits of Gregg's brigade, which joined me less than two days after it. The loss ofd the place with their brigades on the evening of the 13th. General Gregg, the senior of the two, reported to me on my arrival at night. ansporting. In the Federal official report, their skirmishing with Gregg's and Walker's brigades is exaggerated into a heavy engagement of treek-too late to influence his action. On the 15th the march of Gregg's and Walker's troops was continued ten miles, to Calhoun Station. cksburg, there was no longer an object for moving to the northwest; Gregg's and Walker's brigades were, therefore, ordered to march to Canton
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 7 (search)
re was no shadow of reason to keep two divisions in the town. Those two divisions, and four brigades detached, including Gregg's See page 175. and Walker's, ordered to Jackson, could and should have been in the battle of Baker's Creek, and would hhat the loss of the battle of Baker's Creek was inevitable. It certainly was made probable by the complete separation of Gregg's and Walker's brigades See General Pemberton's report, pp. 205, 206. from his army, and his detaching Vaughn's and Reyve that depot and give him time to defeat the enemy's plans. Lieutenant-General Hardee was immediately requested to send Gregg's and McNair's brigades from Meridian and Enterprise to Atlanta, and to replace them at those points by Featherston's andprovidence our loss was severe, but results were commensurate. McNair's and Ector's brigades, the latter substituted for Gregg's, were sent back to Mississippi by General Bragg, after the battle of Chickamauga. The honorable part they bore in that
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Letters. (search)
d's army, Ector's and McNair's of Bragg's, and Gregg's of Pemberton's, have effective nine thousandops from South Carolina, to reenforce Brigadier-General Gregg, at Raymond. At this time, informatiemy was in force opposite Baldwin's Ferry, and Gregg was notified accordingly, and informed that thon. Unofficial information represents Brigadier-General Gregg and his small command to have behavedif opportunity to fight presented itself? General Gregg will move toward Canton to-morrow. If prir the battle of Baker's Creek, suggested. General Gregg, with his brigade from Port Hudson, having point, where it will be seen that, though General Gregg sustained the advance of the enemy nobly auperior force): Vicksburg, May 11, 1863. General Gregg: From information from General Tilghmaimmediately with your command to Raymond. General Gregg has been ordered, if the enemy advance on m drawing provisions from the East. This one (Gregg's, with which he was present in person) may be[7 more...]