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An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 13 1 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps.. You can also browse the collection for Maxy Gregg or search for Maxy Gregg in all documents.

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reparations being completed, Brigadiers Featherstone and Pryor moved up towards Beaver Dam Creek on the right, and Brigadier Maxy Gregg, towards Ellison's Mills, on the left, Jackson being still to the enemy's rear, and converging towards the Chickahted redoubt. In the midst of all this din, loud reports from the left, and stray shell screaming over head, told that Gregg's South-Carolinian brigade was similarly engaged at Ellison's Mills. Profiting by Ripley's discomfiture the previous evening, Gregg determined to cross the swamp some distance higher up, while engaging the enemy's attention in front. At the moment, therefore, that the engagement opened on his right-fully convinced he had naught to fear from any force sent from Beavp, and subjected the enemy to a destructive two-sided fire, while shells poured thick and fast on their line of retreat. Gregg displayed his usual judgment in this brilliant affair, and his success doubtless expedited matters at Beaver Dam Creek.
rs to be about thirty-five or forty years of age, and is now Major-General C. S. A. Of his frequent successes, much is said in the course of this narrative. Maxy Gregg sits his horse in the shade, conversing with a few about the affair at Ellison's Mills, and seems a very modest, quiet gentleman, of about fifty. His hair is gchieved no distinction until the affair at Vienna, when he successfully smashed up a Dutch General's reconnoissance on the railroad, as narrated in another place. Gregg is called! he leans his head through a window and converses with Lee, but trots away as if dissatisfied. There goes Gregg, some one remarks, looking as black as Gregg, some one remarks, looking as black as thunder because not appointed to the advance. Wilcox, Pryor, and Featherstone are also present, conversing freely and gaily, as if about to start upon some pleasant pic-nic. The latter is a long-bodied, eagle-faced, quiet man of thirty-five years, without moustaches or whiskers, with a prominent Roman nose and compressed lips;