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isoners. Colonel Welch, of the One Hundred and Sixteenth Michigan, was killed while leading his men over the enemy's works. After reforming our lines, another charge was made, when the rebels were forced back half a mile further, where they took a still stronger position and made a desperate resistance to our advance. The Ninth corps having the advance here, the rebels succeeded in throwing a force around the Pegram House, on its left, and threatened to turn our flank; but General Griffin's division being at hand, they were checked. The fighting was of the most desperate character, and continued till after dark, our men holding at that time all the ground they had taken from the enemy. Our loss in the battle will amount to about five hundred, while that of the rebels is probably not so large, as they fought nearly all the time behind breastworks. A heavy battle is expected to morrow, and it is believed that we shall take Petersburg during the day, such is t
a word with the prisoners.--They were quiet, cheerless, mournful. The property they once owned, the freedom they once enjoyed, the happiness once felt, were all gone, and the hated Northman lorded over them as they once would the African. Griffin is now an outpost. All trains from above have been withdrawn, the telegraph wire taken down and the country evacuated. We have nothing from, Hood's army of a very authentic nature, except that it was on the march beyond the Chattahoochee when mes, writing from Lovejoy, says: The Chattanooga Rebel, which was being published quite successfully at Griffin, has been obliged to pack up and enter a box-car once more. Governor Brown has succeeded in getting the State cotton away from Griffin. It amounted to about forty thousand bales when Atlanta was evacuated. The town is being depopulated rapidly, each train of cars bearing away hundreds. The hospitals have been moved to Albany, Georgia. General Hood has issued the follow
We have by flag of truce Northern dates of October 5. In the engagement of September 30, near Squirrel Level, the Federals acknowledge a loss of two thousand in killed, wounded and prisoners, more than half of whom were prisoners. On Sunday last a shell from a rebel battery grazed General Meade's boot leg, took a piece from the tail of General Humphrey's horse, and entered the ground between Generals Bartlett and Griffin. The shell did not explode. The Tribune is silent as regards operations north of the James, but says Farragut arrived at Fortress Monroe on the 4th and proceeded up James river. A dispatch to the Tribune from Louisville, dated October 4th, says that "a band of thirty-five guerrillas captured two upward- bound freight trains on the Nashville railroad at 10 o'clock last night, between Richland station and Fountainhead. They burned nineteen cars, but they contained no stores. To-day the trains will be slightly disarranged by the disaster."
re he can do us the least mischief beyond robbing citizens. "General Hood's base is still behind him. He can fall back, in case the exigencies of events require it, in any direction except that covered by about fifty-five degrees, of which Atlanta is very nearly the centre. "Major Horback, of the Army of Tennessee, has been sent to LaGrange as post quartermaster in the place of Major W. F. Ayer, who has been appointed chief quartermaster of the Army of Tennessee. "It is stated that General Hood is tearing up the tracks of the Georgia, Macon and West Point roads. Seventy miles, it is stated, of the Georgia road will be torn up, and the Macon road to Griffin, and the West Point road to Newman. "All the cotton at Palmetto has been brought away safely. A large quantity had been stored away at that point. "The Macon Intelligencer states, it is rumored that Hood has captured a whole corpse of the enemy, amounting to seven thousand, in the rear of Sherman's army."
r, 7 miles; Stone mountain, 16; Lithonia, 24; Conyer's, 31; Covington, 41; Social Circle, 52; Rutledge, 59; Madison, 67; Buckhead, 75; Greensboro', 88; Union Point, 95; Crawfordville, 106; Barnett, 118; Camak, 124; Thomson, 134; Dearing, 142; Sawdust, 145; Berrelia, 151; Belair, 161; Augusta, 171. The distances from Atlanta to Macon, on the Macon and Western railroad, are: From Atlanta to East Point, 6 miles; Rough and Ready, 11; Morrow's, 17; Jonesboro', 22; Lovejoy's, 29; Fayette, 36; Griffin, 48; Thornton, 49; Milner, 54; Barnesville, 61; (there is a branch line from this point to Thomaston, 10 miles); Goggin's, 66; Collier's, 71; Forsyth, 77; Smart's, 82; Crawford's, 88; Howard's, 95; Macon, 103. From the Trans-Mississippi. Late news from the Trans-Mississippi region informs us that the only portion of Texas occupied by the Federals is Padre island, near Brownsville.--They give us no trouble now, and their blockading and invading forces are both nominal. Price, with
ing a nearly southeastern course, runs the Central railroad. At Gordon, on the Central railroad, about fifteen miles east of Macon, a branch railroad runs through Milledgeville to a place called Eatendon. This place is about fifteen miles from Madison, on the Georgia railroad. It is said that a portion of Sherman's army went out as far as Madison, on the Georgia railroad, and leaving it, struck across to Eatendon, the immediate object being Milledgeville, the capital of the State. It is believed that Sherman himself pursued the Macon railroad until he came to Griffin, several miles above Barneville, and thence struck across to Gordon, avoiding Macon altogether, and by this movement placing his whole force in the rear of it. The Georgia railroad terminates at Augusta. Hamburg, the South Carolina town, is on the opposite side of the river. We give these positions merely that the reader may be enabled to judge between the conflicting accounts he will find in the newspapers.
on. The reports that he was advancing in two columns is confirmed. Of the column going towards Macon, the Intelligencer of the 18th says: The latest reliable intelligence from the front in Georgia we have received from a gentleman who left Griffin last night (Wednesday) at 10 o'clock. General Wheeler fought the enemy — who was advancing with a force estimated at from twenty-five to thirty thousand, in two columns: one on the McDonough and the other on the Jonesboro' road — at Bear creek, ten miles above Griffin, until late in the evening, when he fell back to Griffin, and was passing through that city, on its right, when our informant left. Our infantry forces were falling back to Barnesville. It is probable, at the time we write, that Sherman occupies Griffin, and will rapidly demonstrate upon this city, and perhaps Milledgeville. It is reported that Sherman has applied the torch to a large portion of Atlanta and has burnt Jonesboro' and McDonough. It is also reported that
Three Hundred Dollars reward --I will give the above reward for the arrest and delivery to the undersigned, living in Richmond, of three young Negro Men, named Edward, Griffin and Murry Fox, aged twenty-five, twenty-two and twenty. Edward is of a gingerbread color; of middle size, with a Roman nose; his step is quick; stammers a little, and dresses well, with a good address. Griffin is about the same height; nose slender, with a protrusion of the under jaw, and is also quick in his motiGriffin is about the same height; nose slender, with a protrusion of the under jaw, and is also quick in his motions, and of an obliging disposition. Murry is rather darker and taller; inclines to stoop a little in the shoulders; has long eye-lashes. They left, it is supposed, on Tuesday night, the twenty-seventh instant. They are brothers; and Edward (the eldest) was brought to his mistress on the evening of the twenty-ninth instant, at the Exchange Hotel, when he broke from his custodian and made his escape, and will probably take the route he first took to Charles City county. He was arrested near
Three Hundred Dollars reward. --I will give the above reward for the arrest and delivery to the undersigned, living in Richmond, for each of three Negro men, named Edward, Griffin and Murry Fox, aged twenty-five, twenty-two and twenty. Edward is of a gingerbread color; of middle size, with a Roman nose; his step is quick; stammers a little, and dresses well, with a good address. Griffin is about the same height; more slender, with a protrusion of the under jaw, and is also quick in his Griffin is about the same height; more slender, with a protrusion of the under jaw, and is also quick in his motions, and of an obliging disposition. Murry is rather darker and taller; inclines to stoop a little in the shoulders; has long eye-lashes. They left, it is supposed, on Tuesday night, the twenty-seventh instant. They are brothers; and Edward (the eldest) was brought to his mistress on the evening of the twenty-ninth instant, at the Exchange Hotel, when he broke from his custodian and made his escape, and will probably take the route he first took to Charles City county. He was arrested n
Three-Hundred Dollars reward. --I will give the above reward for the arrest and delivery to the undersigned, living in Richmond, for each of three Negro men, named Edward, Griffin, and Murry Fox, aged twenty-five, twenty-two and twenty. Edward is of a ginger bread color; of middle size, with a Roman nose; his step is quick; stammers a little, and dresses well, with a good address. Grillin is about the some height; more slender, with a protrusion of the under jaw, and is also quick in his motrons, and of an obliging disposition. Morry is rather darker and taller; inclines to stoop a little in the shoulders; has long eye-lashes. They left, it is supposed, on Tuesday night, the twenty-seventh instant. They are brothers; and Edward (the eldest) was brought to his mistress on the evening of the twenty-ninth instant, at the Exchange Hotel, when he broke from his custodian and made his escape, and with probably take the route he first took to in said county. Virginia Lynch. ja
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