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ost its gallant colonel, Charles F. Fisher. This regiment had, by a dangerous ride on the Manassas railroad, been hurried forward to take part in the expected engagement. When it arrived at Manassas Junction, the battle was already raging. Colonel Fisher moved his regiment forward entirely under cover until he reached an open field leading up to the famous Henry house plateau, on which were posted Ricketts' magnificent battery of Federal regulars with six Parrott guns, and not far away Griffin's superbly-equipped battery of Fifth United States regulars. These batteries, the com manders of which both rose to be major-generals, had done excellent service during the day, and not until they were captured was McDowell's army routed. At the time of Fisher's arrival these guns, which had only recently been moved to this plateau, were supported by the Eleventh New York (Fire Zouaves) and the Fourteenth (Brooklyn) New York. Fisher's presence was not even suspected by the enemy until he
ive and unsupportable, still the Second Maine on the right and the largest body of the Forty-fourth New York on the left, maintained their ground without flinching. (It is now disclosed that they were assailed by four times their number.) This four times their number was, as seen above, only Cowan's and Lee's regiments. Federal reinforcements soon arrived. Generals Porter and Morell hastened personally to the firing, and at this crisis sent in the Thirteenth and Fourteenth New York and Griffin's battery to reform Martindale's broken line. The Ninth Massachusetts and Sixty-second Pennsylvania were hurried back from toward Hanover. Their line of march threw them on Branch's left flank and rear, and, already far outnumbered before the arrival of this new force, Branch was left no option except to retreat. The Seventh North Carolina and Forty-fifth Georgia, which had been held in reserve and not at all engaged, covered the Confederate retreat Branch's loss, including Lane's, was
noble and gallant soldier, Gen. Lawrence O'Brian Branch. General Lee lost about one-third of his army on this field of blood. The next day, however, he remained on the field, defiant and ready to meet any new attack Mc-Clellan might order, but his enemy had suffered enough and made no move. That night he quietly crossed the Potomac without loss or molestation. General Pendleton, with the reserve artillery and about 600 infantry, was left to guard the ford near Shepherdstown. General Griffin headed some volunteers from four regiments, crossed the river, and driving off Pendleton's infantry, captured three or four pieces of artillery. The next morning, some brigades from the divisions of Morell and Sykes crossed the river. Their crossing and advance were protected by numerously posted batteries on the Federal side. Gen. A. P. Hill's division was ordered by General Jackson to drive these forces across the Potomac. Hill advanced with the brigades of Pender, Gregg and Thomas, i
predecessors were. General Ransom now moved the rest of his division to the crest, and sent the Twenty-fifth North Carolina to the front line; General Kershaw came up with some of his regiments, and subsequently some of Kemper's were ordered forward. The men in the rear loaded guns, and the ranks interchanged, and in this way an almost continuous fire blazed forth from the line of the stone wall. After Howard, attacks were made by Sturgis' division, supported by Getty's division. Then Griffin made the brave endeavor. Humphreys next essayed to carry the hill by the bayonet, and desperately did he try, but again his men melted as snow. Dead men were lying in such piles in some places that the living could hardly get by, and yet the rash endeavor was kept up. So clearly did those Federals who had stubbornly battled against the position recognize that it was useless to continue such assaults, that General Humphreys says they tried by force to prevent his men from making the attemp
y. As Ewell advanced—Jones' brigade in front, followed by Battle's and Doles' on Battle's right—Griffin's division of Warren's corps, composed of the brigades of Ayres, Bartlett and Barnes, fell uponlater formed on Daniel's right. These North Carolinians and Georgians gallantly dashed against Griffin's men, forced Ayres across the pike, and restored the Confederate line. Gordon being on the fl, supported on the left by Dennison's brigade, advanced through the dense thickets to reinforce Griffin. He reached the firing line, says Humphreys, just about the time that Daniel's and Gordon's brso had been seriously struggling. Steuart's brigade, along with Battle's, engaged the right of Griffin, whose left had been turned by Daniel and Gordon. In Steuart's attack, the First and Third Norming his right, bore an honorable part. They charged upon a line of infantry supporting one of Griffin's batteries, drove it and captured two howitzers. The Regimental History of the Third regiment
Daniel Ammen, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.2, The Atlantic Coast (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: reduction of Newbern—the Albemarle. (search)
red from New York for Port Royal, and was once towed outside the line of blockade by a gunboat. Owing to extraordinary army operations on or near James River, and a co-operation where practicable of naval forces which were withdrawn from North Carolina, an unwonted quiet prevailed for months within the sounds and on the coasts of that State, broken only by very frequent captures of blockade-runners. An account of a Confederate victory was published in the newspapers, the report of Colonel Griffin, commanding. It was as follows: January 30, 1864, engaged the enemy with a force of 200 men and a mounted rifle piece. After a fight of two hours, in which we engaged 1,200 of the enemy and three pieces of artillery, the Yankees were driven from Windsor, N. C., to their boats. We lost six men; the loss of the enemy is not known. In relation to this, Flusser says: The report is false from beginning to conclusion. I planned the affair, and we would have captured the entire party ha
ander S. W., 18, 21, 48, 56, 58 Goldsborough, Rear-Admiral L. M., 176 et seq.. 182 Governor, the, U. S. steamer, 14, 17 Granite, the, 177 Grant, General U. S., 215, 227 Graves, Master G. W., 177, 189 Great Britain, opinions there on the destruction of Charleston Harbor, 41 et seq.; statement purported from her consul at Charleston, 78 et seq.; English steamers attempt blockade-running, 146; blockade-runner taken, 146 Green, Mate, 237 Gregory. Rear-Admiral, 110, 122 Griffin. Colonel, 199 Guss, Colonel, 50 H. Haggerty, Commander Francis S., 21 Hale, the, U. S. tug, 43 et seq., 48, 63 et seq., 70 Hampton Roads, expedition to, 13 et seq. Harriet Lane, the U. S. revenue cutter, 165 et seq. Harris, Ensign, 237 Harris, Lieutenant-Commander T. C., 128 Hartford, the, U. S. steamer, 7 Harvest Moon, the, U. S. steamer, 148, 159 Hatch, General, 152 et seq. Hatteras Inlet, 163 et seq. Hatteras, the, U. S. vessel, 74 Hawkins
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
ley Johnson. The election was held on February 6th, under the direction and supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel Ridgeley Brown, by Captains Emack, Welsh and Schwartz, of the cavalry; Captains Crane, Mc-Aleer and Gwynn, of the infantry, and Captain Griffin and Lieutenant Brown, of the artillery. The Colonel of the First regiment Maryland Line was unanimously elected to command the Line. This was the largest force of Marylanders ever collected during the war in the Confederate army. It cothe prelude to the opening scenes upon the theatre of the war. On the 21st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Maryland line in the Confederate Army. (search)
1864. Sir,—You are hereby required to cause an early election for the Colonelcy of your present command in the Maryland Line; the election to be full and complete. Very respectfully, your obedient servant, S. Cooper, A. and I. G. Colonel Bradley Johnson. The election was held on February 6th, under the direction and supervision of Lieutenant-Colonel Ridgeley Brown, by Captains Emack, Welsh and Schwartz, of the cavalry; Captains Crane, Mc-Aleer and Gwynn, of the infantry, and Captain Griffin and Lieutenant Brown, of the artillery. The Colonel of the First regiment Maryland Line was unanimously elected to command the Line. This was the largest force of Marylanders ever collected during the war in the Confederate army. It consisted of a regiment of infantry, one of cavalry, and four batteries, all in a high state of efficiency. On March 23, 1864, a general order was issued from the Adjutant and Inspector General's office, directing the establishment of two camps, in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery. (search)
that could be desired. The officers and men engaged, won for their battalion a distinction, which I feel assured will never be tarnished, and which will even serve to urge them and their corps to high endeavor. The engagement of the 18th was but the prelude to the opening scenes upon the theatre of the war. On the 21st was fought the battle of Manassas, and again did the battalion do yeoman service. Posted upon the ridge, near the Henry House, they fought the batteries of Ricketts and Griffin, which were finally abandoned on the field. It was a case very similar to the description given by the Duke of Wellington to a lady, who asked him at a dinner party to describe to her the battle of Waterloo. The battle of Waterloo, ma'am? Why, we pommelled the French, they pommelled us, and we pommelled the hardest, so we gained the day. Stonewall Jackson and Bee's brigades supported and fought with our guns. During the heaviest of the conflict, when shell and bullet were falling thicke
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