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osition with brilliant effect, with spherical case, the enemy having first opened on him from a rifled battery, probably Griffin's, with elongated cylindrical shells, which flew a few feet above the heads of our men, and exploded in the crest of a eintzelman's divisions, Sherman's and Keyes's brigades of Tyler's division, and of the formidable batteries of Ricketts, Griffin, and Arnold, Regulars, and the 2d Rhode Island, and two Dahlgren howitzers, a force of over twenty thousand infantry, sef the Federalists, the object of their unstinted expenditure in outfit—and the equally powerful Regular light battery of Griffin were brought forward and placed in immediate action, after having, conjointly with the batteries already mentioned, playthat is, about eighteen per cent. of the brigade. A regiment of Franklin's brigade (Gorman's) lost twenty-one per cent. Griffin's (battery) loss was thirty per cent., and that of Keyes's brigade, which was so handled by its commander as to be expos
onfederates were actively engaged in strengthening their defensive works. On the 21st, however, the 2d and 6th Federal Corps were withdrawn from the lines and sent on a flanking movement to the left, with a view to encircle the besieged city farther towards the west, and, if possible, to seize the Weldon road. The 2d Corps (Hancock's), now temporarily under General Birney, had the lead. It established itself west of the Jerusalem plank road, and soon formed a junction with a division (Griffin's) of the 5th Corps, which had been posted on the east side. The other corps (the 6th) came up during the night, taking position on the left and rear of the 2d; and Wilson's and Kautz's cavalry were then sent to cut the Weldon and Southside railroads. General Lee divined the intention of the enemy, and countermovements were immediately ordered to thwart his purpose. By some misunderstanding between the Federal officers commanding this expedition, the 2d Corps became separated from the
ttern smooth-bores, rifled and furnished with projectiles also invented by General James. Captain Parrott's gun soon followed James's. This was constructed by shrinking a wrought-iron reinforce over the breech of a cast-iron core, and was noted for its fewness of grooves and smallness of caliber in proportion to the weight of the projectile, which was very elongated. Wiard's gun was of steel, hammered and welded, and was accompanied by a peculiar and novel carriage. The 3-inch Ordnance or Griffin gun was finally adopted for rifled fieldartillery, and large numbers were in service at the close of the civil war in the United States. This is a wrought-iron gun weighing about 820 pounds, rifled with 7 grooves, and carrying a projectile weighing about 10 pounds. A cast-iron rifled siegegun, 4 1/2 inch caliber, and carrying a projectile weighting about 30 pounds, was introduced into the service at the same time. About 1812, Colonel Bomford, U. S. A., introduced a chambered gun called
d gives the specific gravity of the latter. See Mohr's specific gravity balance, pages 39, 40, Griffin's chemical handicraft. Spe-cif′ic-grav′i-ty In′--stru-ment. Professor Hare's litrameter, heat. If air be in excess, the mixture explodes, and the gas takes fire within the tube. See Griffin's Chemical handicraft, London, 1866, pages 96, 97. See also Die Spectralanalyse, Schellen, Bra24, 5925, 5926, 5927, show the mode of application, and several forms of the device. a, from Griffin. b, Rosette-burner (Griffin). c, Rosette-burner (Griffin). d, Bogart, 1867. e, AlleGriffin). c, Rosette-burner (Griffin). d, Bogart, 1867. e, Allen; patent, September 7, 1869. f, Bradley, 1865. g, McGlensey; patent, June 19, 1860. h, Osmond; patent, March 14, 1865. i, Griswold, 1868. j, Bloxam's Chemistry. k, Webb and Parkin,Griffin). d, Bogart, 1867. e, Allen; patent, September 7, 1869. f, Bradley, 1865. g, McGlensey; patent, June 19, 1860. h, Osmond; patent, March 14, 1865. i, Griswold, 1868. j, Bloxam's Chemistry. k, Webb and Parkin, 1871. l, Lazear and Sharp, 1868. m, Hamilton; patent, April 26, 1870. n, Bogart, 1866. Bunsen burners. Stove-damp′er. A shutter or valve to regulate the size of an opening at whic
a regiment, having relatives and friends in the army, are concerned about the religious privileges which we enjoy. A brief sketch of this feature of camp life in the 19th regiment will doubtless be gratifying to them. Every night the voice of prayer and praise is heard in one or more of the tents, and on the Sabbath mornings and evenings and on Wednesday nights, sermons are preached in a church in the immediate vicinity of the camp by the chaplain, the Rev. P. Slaughter, assisted by the Rev. Mr. Griffin. The interest of these services was much enhanced on last Sunday by the celebration of the sacraments of baptism and the Lord's Supper, and by the admission of three officers to their first communion. Many hearty prayers were offered that they may manfully fight under the banner of the Cross, and continue Christ's faithful soldiers until their lives end. It is encouraging to see the disposition of those in command to furnish facilities for public worship, and the alacrity of the men
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section tenth: downfall of the Rebellion. (search)
n, we have fought through the War together. I have done the best that I could for you. There were few dry eyes among those who witnessed the scene; and our soldiers hastened to divide their rations with their late enemies, now fellow-countrymen, to stay their hunger until provisions from our trains could be drawn for them. Then, while most of our army returned to Burkesville, and thence, a few days later, to Petersburg and Richmond, the work of paroling went on, under the guardianship of Griffin's and Gibbon's infantry, with McKenzie's cavalry; and, so fast as paroled, the Confederates took their way severally to their respective homes: many of them supplied with transportation, as well as food, by the government they had fought so long and so bravely to subvert and destroy. Ii. The day after the fall of Richmond, Mr. Lincoln visited the Capital of the late Confederacy, so recently and suddenly abandoned by its fugitive chief. Being recognized by the Black population as he
and had passed, they all experienced a sense of relief, as they crowded around their departing chief, who, with streaming eyes, grasped and pressed their outstretched hands, at length finding words to say, Men, we have fought through the War together. I have done the best that I could for you. There were few dry eyes among those who witnessed the scene; and our soldiers hastened to divide their rations with their late enemies, now fellow-countrymen, to stay their hunger until provisions from our trains could be drawn for them. Then, while most of our army returned to Burkesville, and thence, a few days later, to Petersburg and Richmond, the work of paroling went on, under the guardianship of Griffin's and Gibbon's infantry, with McKenzie's cavalry; and, so fast as paroled, the Confederates took their way severally to their respective homes: many of them supplied with transportation, as well as food, by the government they had fought so long and so bravely to subvert and destroy.
Erasmus D. Beattie, Jas. Bird, Chas. C. Brusseau, October. Carroll, Jno. W. Clancy, Jeremiah. Wounded. Clifford, Richard. Cross, Fred K. Died since muster out. Deveon, Clement. Doolan, Patrick. Dustin, Redford. Dupee, Louis. Ellis, Obed. Essler, Jno. Died since muster out. Esterbrook, Wm. H. Eton, Edwin D. Fannin, Joseph. Fischer, Henry B. Gardiner, Jno. Galliff, Geo. H. Gordon, Jno. Killed or died in hospital. Griffin, Ira. Hall, Albert F. Killed or died in hospital. Hatch, Albert P. Helmer, J. Herron, Wm. Hewitt, Chas. B. Higgins, Fred T. Horrigan, Jno. Horrigan, Michael. Holden, Jas. Hudson, Wm. J. Huntington, Chas. Irish, Millard F. Isaacs, Wm. H. Killed or died in hospital. Kelly, Michael. Kelly, Patrick. Kelly, William. King, Z. Laughlin. Lemay, Peter. Longfellow, Ernest. Commissioned, later. Libby, Geo. Maine, Jno. W.
nts where the need of support was extreme. Now, midst the din and confusion, the screaming of shot and shell, the shrieking of minie balls, Bartlett's brigade and the First Massachusetts Battery were sent to the right, where Sykes' division and Griffin's brigade for more than an hour had firmly held their ground against repeated stubborn attacks. Never was a reinforcement more welcome. Speedily we moved up and onward to the right, where, forming the right section of an arc, partly in the woods, and partly in the open ground reaching toward the rear of Cold Harbor, the troops of Sykes and Griffin were desperately stemming the tide. Bartlett's regiments are brought into line. Our guns are unlimbered, and caissons move to the rear. It was without doubt the material aid afforded by Gen. Slocum's reinforcement of this part of the line, at this juncture, that saved the Federal right. Let this fact be remembered to the credit of the Sixth Army Corps and the gallant commander of it
es, Mr. and Mrs. C. E.24 Webster Street Giles, Mr. and Mrs. C. F.35 Boston Street Giles, Mr. and Mrs. Everett 65 Glen Street Gladwell, Mr. and Mrs. A. A.616 Broadway Glines, Mr. and Mrs. A. W.142 Powder-house Boulevard Glines, Mr. and Mrs. E. G.51 Dartmouth Street Glines, Miss Fannie51 Dartmouth Street Goodil, Harold88 Cross Street Goodil, Roy 89 Cross Street Gooding, Mr. and Mrs. E. H.14 Boston Street Gooding, Mrs. Mabel21 Webster Street Graves, Mrs. Fannie A.22 Franklin Street Griffin, Miss Bertha E.8 Munroe Street Grover, Mr. and Mrs. George E.146 Broadway Hadley, Mr. and Mrs. Walter18 Hathorn Street Haines, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. 214 Highland Avenue Hall, Mr. and Mrs. E. C.94 Perkins Street Ham, Mrs. SylviaMystic Avenue Ham, Mrs. E41 Boston Street Harmon, Mr. and Mrs. A. A.21-A Cross Street Harris, H. A.21 Mt. Vernon Street Harvey, Mrs. Annie8 Chester Avenue Harwood, Mr. and Mrs. Horace233 Highland Avenue Haven, Mr. and Mrs. George D.181 Washington Street Haven
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