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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 105 1 Browse Search
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osely to those points. Generals Sickles's and Grover's brigades deployed right and left, and moved into the forest in line of battle, Grover being commander on the actual field of battle, with orderspressed that the enemy were most numerous. Gen. Grover was so satisfied of the fact that he notifis. It might have proved disastrous had not Gen. Grover taken a responsibility. While he was press three hundred yards to the left of the road. Grover's line joined on to Sickles's left, and was forigade soon began, however, to push forward on Grover's left, drove the enemy rapidly and easily befnd advanced until they completed the line from Grover's left. Robinson's brigade (late Jameson's) w. Orderly after orderly rushed in to tell how Grover was driving them, and others to say that Sicklorder in which they had already done so well. Grover, on the left, got in first again and rattled aey's brigade against the enemy. Pushing in on Grover's left and between Grover and Robinson, he wen[17 more...]
e I had left him early in the morning. About nine o'clock my line of battle was established — Grover on the right, Carr in the centre, and Sickles's brigade on the left. In the mean time, directing. After great loss the enemy gave way, and were instantly followed with great gallantry by Grover at the head of the First Massachusetts regiment, while the Sixty-ninth Pennsylvania, heroically led by Owen, advanced in the open field on their flank, with almost reckless daring. Grover was reinforced by the Second New-Hampshire and the Twenty-sixth Pennsylvania regiments, but not until aftsplendid execution in the rebel ranks, and greatly contributed to our success. The troops under Grover were withdrawn from the pursuit at dark, and restored to their places in line of battle. Soonake my heartfelt acknowledgments to my brigade commanders, and especially am I indebted to Brig.-Gen. Grover for his great gallantry on this field. I also beg leave to call the attention of the Ma
in the Supplement. Report of General Hooker. headquarters Hooker's division, Third army corps, camp near Harrison's Landing, James River, Va., July 18, 1862. Captain C. McKeever, Assistant Adjutant-General, Third Army Corps: After withdrawing from Glendale, our march was continued to the Malvern Hills, without interruption, and about ten o'clock A. M. my division was established in line of battle for the defence of our new position. Under a heavy fire of the enemy's artillery, Grover's brigade was strongly posted on the right, Carr's on the left, and well sheltered; subsequently, Sickles's brigade, held in reserve, was posted in rear of my right, protected from the enemy's shots, and well in hand to reinforce any part of my line. Osborne's and Bram's batteries occupied higher ground, where they could reply to the enemy's artillery, or open his columns of infantry should he attempt to advance. Webber's and Bramhall's batteries were located in rear of those, and held i
th the dead and wounded of the enemy in our hands. In this attack, Grover's brigade of Hooker's division was particularly distinguished by a ns of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth. Generals Birney, Robinson and Grover, of Heintzelman's corps, commanded their brigades during the actione first of September, with zeal and gallantry, and Gens. Birney and Grover were especially distinguished in the actions of the twenty-ninth anon, during the greater part of the afternoon. Toward evening, Gen. Grover coming up with his New-England brigade, I saw him forming line tiscovered a large number of rebels fleeing before the left flank of Grover's brigade. They passed across an open space some three hundred yarn rallying, came surging back, driving before their immense columns Grover's brigade and my handful of men. An hour before the charge I had New-York, under Col. Wainwright, and the Seventh Indiana, under Major Grover. In this attempt the enemy lost heavily, and were compelled to
f battle, with the dead and wounded of the enemy in our hands. In this attack, Grover's brigade of Hooker's division was particularly distinguished by a determined bng the actions of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth. Generals Birney, Robinson and Grover, of Heintzelman's corps, commanded their brigades during the actions of the tweaction of the first of September, with zeal and gallantry, and Gens. Birney and Grover were especially distinguished in the actions of the twenty-ninth and thirtieth g by battalion, during the greater part of the afternoon. Toward evening, Gen. Grover coming up with his New-England brigade, I saw him forming line to attack theim. I soon discovered a large number of rebels fleeing before the left flank of Grover's brigade. They passed across an open space some three hundred yards in front us, and, soon rallying, came surging back, driving before their immense columns Grover's brigade and my handful of men. An hour before the charge I had sent one of
ridges were reduced to two or three rounds. Gen. Ricketts now came from the right, and voluntarily relieved my men at the fence, who fell back some ten paces, and lay down on their arms. A few volleys from Ricketts ended the contest in about thirty minutes, and the enemy withdrew from the field. Not, however, until an attempt to flank us on our left, which was gallantly met by a partial change of front of the Seventy-sixth New-York, under Col. Wainwright, and the Seventh Indiana, under Major Grover. In this attempt the enemy lost heavily, and were compelled to retreat in disorder. While the main attack was going on at the fence referred to, Col. Rogers, with his own, and Lieut.-Col. Gates's regiments — the Twentieth and Twenty-first New-York volunteers, of Patrick's brigade — rendered most essential service by advancing his right and holding a fence bounding the north-east side of the same corn-field, anticipating the enemy, who made a furious rush to seize this fence, but were
vanced his pickets in the woods on our left front, and during the night captured a good many of our men, who went there believing we still held the woods. It was in this way that my Assistant Adjustant-General, Lieutenant F. J. Jones, and Lieut. J. A. Grover, Assistant Adjutant-General Seventeenth brigade, were captured by the enemy. I regretted the capture of these young gentlemen deeply. They had behaved most gallantly during the day, and I can truly say deserve well of their country. Majin great force toward the ground we had just been holding. I immediately ordered my regiment to face about, and advanced to meet the enemy, intending, in the absence of ammunition, to charge him with the bayonet. I was met here, however, by Lieut. Grover, of Col. Lytle's staff, with an order from him to retire. Accordingly, we turned into a ravine on the right of the road, and were supplying ourselves with ammunition, when, hearing that Col. Lytle, my brigade commander, was killed, and bei
in front of our picket-lines at Fair Oaks, to the left of the railroad. General Hooker accordingly sent orders to Brig.-Gen. Grover, of the First brigade, to assign one regiment of his force for that purpose. Gen. Grover selected the Sixteenth MaGen. Grover selected the Sixteenth Massachusetts, Col. P. T. Wyman. This regiment composed part of the late reenforcements in Hooker's division. The object of the reconnoissance was to ascertain the exact character of the ground in front of our picket-line, through the wood, to the l distance in advance of this position, in the wood, reaching the edge of the forest, fronting our picket reserves. Brig.-Gen. Grover ordered Major Lamson, with five hundred men from the First brigade, to act as a support, behind an earthwork to thefield. Four of the dead of the Sixteenth were brought in and buried in the camp-ground, Rev. A. B. Fuller, chaplain of the regiment, officiating on the sad occasion. Gen. Grover and numerous officers were present. The scene was very impressive.