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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Promotion to first Lieutenant-capture of the City of Mexico-the Army-Mexican soldiers- peace negotiations (search)
h of the mountains, and about thirty miles north of Puebla, both of these passes would have been avoided. The road from Perote to the City of Mexico, by this latter route, is as level as the prairies in our West. Arriving due north from Puebla, troops could have been detached to take possession of that place, and then proceeding west with the rest of the army no mountain would have been encountered before reaching the City of Mexico. It is true this road would have brought troops in by Guadalupe — a town, church and detached spur of mountain about two miles north of the capital, all bearing the same general name-and at this point Lake Texcoco comes near to the mountain, which was fortified both at the base and on the sides: but troops could have passed north of the mountain and come in only a few miles to the north-west, and so flanked the position, as they actually did on the south. It has always seemed to me that this northern route to the City of Mexico, would have been th
told us that private rights must and should be respected. So he found out the owner of the corn and paid for the crop. I may say here, without fear of inaccuracy, that the First Mississippi Regiment, from the Colonel down to the last private, returned home without one article belonging to a citizen of Mexico. The sacred silver and gold vessels and the Church vestments studded over with precious stones, were in an open room at Monterey and also at Saltillo. The image of the Virgin of Guadalupe, a large doll dressed in satin, was admired and examined, but left untouched, though the frock in which she was arrayed was worked in arabesques adorned with diamonds, rubies, and emeralds of great price, and she wore a necklace of immense pearls which were of several colors. Colonel Davis saw one of the soldiers in friendly conversation with an old priest, holding admiringly a gold reliquary, the top of which was rayed with diamonds, several hundred, he thought, altogether. The Mexicans
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Guadalupe-Hidalgo, treaty of (search)
Guadalupe-Hidalgo, treaty of Feb. 2, 1848, between the United States and Mexico, by which the latter ceded to the United States all the country north of the Rio Grande to the point where that river strikes the southern boundary of New Mexico, and westward to one league south of San Diego, Cal.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Mexico, War with (search)
, Sept. 13, a conqueror; and from the grand plaza he proclaimed the conquest of the republic of Mexico. Santa. Ana made some feeble efforts to regain lost power, but failed. He was defeated in two slight battles. Before the close of October he was stripped of every command, and fled for safety to the shores of the Gulf. The president of the Mexican Congress assumed provisional authority, and, on Feb. 2, 1848, that body concluded a treaty of peace with the United States commissioners at Guadalupe-Hidalgo. It was ratified by both governments, and, on July 4, 1848, President Polk proclaimed it. It stipulated the evacuation of Mexico by the American troops within three months; the payment of $3,000,000 in hand, and $12,000,000 in four annual instalments, by the United States to Mexico, for New Mexico and California, which had become territory of the United States by conquest, and, in addition, to assume debts due certain citizens of the United States from Mexico to the amount of $3,5
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Nevada, (search)
Nevada, Formed a part of the Mexican cession to the United States by the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. The Territory of Nevada was created by act of Congress, March 2, 1861, from a portion of Utah. By act of July 14, 1862, a further portion of Utah was added. A State constitution was framed by a convention, and Nevada was admitted into the Union Oct. 31, 1864. Nevada had few inhabitants until after 1859, in the summer of which year silver was found in the Washoe district, when settlers began to pour in Virginia City sprang up as if by magic, and in 1864 it was the second city west of the Rocky Mountains. Gold had been State seal of Nevada. discovered in 1849, by Mormons, but ten years later not more than 1,000 inhabitants were within the Territory. But, two years after the discovery of silver, the number of inhabitants had risen to 16,000. The number of tribal Indians in the State in 1874 was between 4,000 and 5,000. Population in 1880, 62,266; in 1890, 45,761; in 1900,
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Taylor, Zachary 1784- (search)
of the Executive asked for by the resolution. On coming into office I found the military commandant of the Department of California exercising the functions of civil governor in that Territory, and left, as I was, to act under the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, without the aid of any legislative provision establishing a government in that Territory, I thought it best not to disturb that arrangement, made under my predecessor, until Congress should take some action on that subject, I, thereforate of Texas to a very large portion of the most populous district of the Territory commonly designated by the name of New Mexico. If the people of New Mexico had formed a plan of a State government for that Territory as ceded by the treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, and had been admitted by Congress as a State, our Constitution would have afforded the means of obtaining an adjustment of the question of boundary with Texas by a judicial decision. At present, however, no judicial tribunal has the p
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaties. (search)
14, 1867 Mexico: Treaty of ExtraditionMexicoDec. 11, 1861 Convention of Adjustment of claimsWashingtonJuly 4, 1868 Convention of Citizenship of emigrantsWashingtonJuly 10, 1868 Convention of Mutual right to pursue Indians across the boundaryWashingtonJuly 29, 1882 Convention of CommercialWashingtonJan. 20, 1883 Convention of International boundaryWashingtonNov. 12, 1884 Mexican Republic: Convention of Adjustment of claimsWashingtonApril 11, 1839 Treaty of Peace, friendship, limitsGuadalupe-HidalgoFeb. 2, 1848 Treaty of Boundary, etc.MexicoDec. 30, 1853 Morocco: Treaty of Peace and friendshipJan., 1787 Treaty of PeaceSept. 16, 1836 Convention of To maintain light-house at Cape Spartel. (Signed by U. S. Austria, Belgium, Spain, France, Great Britain, Italy, Netherlands, Portugal, Sweden)TangierMay 31, 1865 Convention of Protection (signed by 13 powers)MadridJuly 3, 1880 Muscat: Treaty of Amity and commerceMuscatSept. 21, 1833 Nassau: Convention of Abolishing droit d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. (search)
Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo. A treaty of peace, friendship, limits, and settlements was concluded at Guadalupe-Hidalgo, a city of Mexico, Feb. 2, 1848, between Nicholas P. Trist on the part of the United States, and Don Luis Gonzaga Cuevas, Don Bernardo Couto, and Don Miguel Atristain on the part of Mexico. It provided for a convention for the provisional suspension of hostilities; for the cessation of the blockade of Mexican ports; for the evacuation of the Mexican capital by the UnitedGuadalupe-Hidalgo, a city of Mexico, Feb. 2, 1848, between Nicholas P. Trist on the part of the United States, and Don Luis Gonzaga Cuevas, Don Bernardo Couto, and Don Miguel Atristain on the part of Mexico. It provided for a convention for the provisional suspension of hostilities; for the cessation of the blockade of Mexican ports; for the evacuation of the Mexican capital by the United States troops within a month after the ratification of the treaty, and the evacuation of Mexican territory within three months after such evacuation; for the restoration of prisoners of war; for a commission to survey and define the boundary-lines between the United States and Mexico; for the free navigation of the Gulf of California and the Colorado and Green rivers for United States vessels; freedom of Mexicans in any territory acquired by the United States; Indian incursions; payment of mon
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Trist, Nicholas Philip 1800-1874 (search)
Trist, Nicholas Philip 1800-1874 Diplomatist; born in Charlottesville, Va., June 2, 1800; educated at West Point, where he was acting professor in 1819-20. In 1845 he was chief clerk of the State Department, and was United States commissioner with the army under General Scott in Mexico authorized to treat for peace, which he accomplished at Guadalupe-Hidalgo in January, 1848. He was afterwards United States consul at Havana. He was a personal friend and the private secretary of President Jackson. He died in Alexandria, Va., Feb. 11, 1874.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Arizona, (search)
ish a military post where Tucson now stands......1580 Jesuit missionaries on Santa Cruz River, about......1600 Spaniards from Mexico form settlements from Tucson to the Mexican line, and partly occupy the country for nearly 150 years. They are finally driven out by the Indians before......1821 First hunters and trappers from the United States probably visited Arizona in......1824 All Arizona north of the river Gila is included in cession by Mexico to United States by treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo......Feb. 2, 1848 First American settlers were persons on their way to California, who stopped on the Gila to engage in stock-raising......1849 Gadsden purchase brought to the United States all of Arizona south of the Gila......Dec. 30, 1853 Act of Congress organizing the Territory......Feb. 24, 1863 Gov. John N. Goodwin, in camp at Navajo Springs, formally organizes the territorial government and fixes its temporary seat near Fort Whipple......Dec. 29, 1863 First
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