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er States soon followed: stout hearts were trembling; yet through the tremendous agitation Mr. Sumner stood to principle firm as a rock. He saw the storm impending; he deprecated bloodshed; he felt that the best way to avert it was for the North to hold itself immovable. He exhorted every one to stand for the right with unwavering front. He wrote (Jan. 1) to William Claflin, President of the Massachusetts Senate, Let the timid cry; but let Massachusetts stand stiff: God bless her! To Count Gurowski, author of an admirable treatise on slavery, he wrote (Jan. 8), These compromisers do not comprehend the glory of principle. Perissent les colonies plutot qu'un principle! In a letter to Gov. John A. Andrew, dated Jan. 17, he said, Pray keep Massachusetts sound and firm, firm, firm! against every word or step of concession. In another letter to the same, dated Jan. 28, he said, Timeo Danaos et dona ferentes: don't let these words be ever out of your mind when you think of any proposi
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 10: last days with the tribune (search)
. [Fordyce] Barker is getting up in his practice, and must be a rich man very soon. When I see him trooping about with his two roan horses, I get vexed at you because you aren't a doctor, too. That was apparently what nature laid you out for, but you've been and stopped her. The next year, after wondering how he ever found time to write at all, he wrote a long letter about the Cyclopaedia, the book of poetry, and also about their common friends, Bayard Taylor, George William Curtis, Count Gurowski, Pike, and Parke Godwin, winding up with thanks for the little moral lecture Huntington, his correspondent, had given him on the Cyclopaedia, which he suggested was not needed, because he probably knew its faults and the difficulties attending its composition and publication better than any one else. With the first shot directed against the flag at Fort Sumter, Dana came out for war to the death. The Tribune also buckled on its armor and warned traitors of their doom. The administra
why Slavery concerns the North Masterdom of Slave Oligarchy giant strength used heartlessly the great duty of the North Mr. Hayes' noble Resignation this Enterprise must go on Inscriptions on Achilles' shield the Press on the lecture Count Gurowski--Mr. Seward reasons against secrecy in the Senate speech in Faneuil Hall he addresses only Republicans the question National and local old Abolitionism in Massachusetts the Constitution ordained for Freedom Horace Mann in Congress whad applause, especially at the point when he said that the Fugitive Slave Bill must be made a dead letter. The audience seemed wild with enthusiasm. Handkerchiefs waved from fair hands, and reporters almost forgot their stolid unconcern. Count Gurowski, writing from Brattleboroa, Vt., in his enthusiastic style, said: I have just finished the reading of your admirable Oration. I am en extase. I was near to cry. You have thrown the gauntlet once more to the Gentlemen from the South, brav
y strong and favorable notices of the lecture, and it was reprinted in hundreds of journals. In speaking of its delivery in Metropolitan Hall, the National Era, at Washington, said: Mr. Sumner closed, as he had continued, amid loud and protracted applause, especially at the point when he said that the Fugitive Slave Bill must be made a dead letter. The audience seemed wild with enthusiasm. Handkerchiefs waved from fair hands, and reporters almost forgot their stolid unconcern. Count Gurowski, writing from Brattleboroa, Vt., in his enthusiastic style, said: I have just finished the reading of your admirable Oration. I am en extase. I was near to cry. You have thrown the gauntlet once more to the Gentlemen from the South, bravely, decidedly, and pitilessly. Don't be astonished if they shall send you, covered with laurels as you are, to Coventry. This, undoubtedly, they will do. Being invited to deliver the same address at Auburn, and pressed so earnestly that he cou
C. Edwards Lester, Life and public services of Charles Sumner: Born Jan. 6, 1811. Died March 11, 1874., Section Eighth: the war of the Rebellion. (search)
of color, in carrying the mails. It was reported back on the 27th of the month, by Mr. Collamer, of Vermont, Chairman of the Committee on Post-offices, without amendment, and passed. But in the House, it was laid on the table, by a large majority, on motion of Mr. Colfax. It was renewed, however, by Mr. Sumner, in the next Congress, and became a law. The original of the subjoined letter from Senator Sumner, with the italics marked by its author, is among the papers left by the late Count Gurowski. It shows the clear prophetic vision of the writer. Washington, 8 Jan., 1861. my Dear Count: You will pardon my seeming negligence, and believe that whatever you write always interests and pleases me. Your book, I find on inquiry, has been received by many Senators, who speak of it warmly. I hope that the publishers speak as well. I wish you were here, that I might have the advantage of your conversation and of your overflowing knowledge and sympathy, too. Daily and hourl
of color, in carrying the mails. It was reported back on the 27th of the month, by Mr. Collamer, of Vermont, Chairman of the Committee on Post-offices, without amendment, and passed. But in the House, it was laid on the table, by a large majority, on motion of Mr. Colfax. It was renewed, however, by Mr. Sumner, in the next Congress, and became a law. The original of the subjoined letter from Senator Sumner, with the italics marked by its author, is among the papers left by the late Count Gurowski. It shows the clear prophetic vision of the writer. Washington, 8 Jan., 1861. my Dear Count: You will pardon my seeming negligence, and believe that whatever you write always interests and pleases me. Your book, I find on inquiry, has been received by many Senators, who speak of it warmly. I hope that the publishers speak as well. I wish you were here, that I might have the advantage of your conversation and of your overflowing knowledge and sympathy, too. Daily and hourl
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 35: Massachusetts and the compromise.—Sumner chosen senator.—1850-1851. (search)
s no change in his face or in his manner; and the latter was one of perfect quiet and self-possessed dignity. He certainly was far less elated than was my father or any of my father's children; though the elation was natural enough with us, as we were then by no means grown up. Sumner remained at Cambridge two or three nights. Longfellow wrote in his diary, April 24:— A pleasant dinner, at the close of which we heard the news of Sumner's election. In the evening came Lowell and Gurowski and Palfrey, and Sumner himself to escape from the triumph and be quiet from all the noise in the streets of Boston. He is no more elated by his success than he has been depressed by the failure heretofore, and evidently does not desire the office. He says he would resign now if any one of the same sentiments as himself could be put in his place. 25. The papers are all ringing with Sumner, Sumner! and the guns thundering out their triumph; meanwhile the hero of the strife is sitting
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3, Chapter 40: outrages in Kansas.—speech on Kansas.—the Brooks assault.—1855-1856. (search)
thized with its sentiments, and gloried in its genius, calling it an event in itself, made all the greater by what followed, the only answer its opponents were capable of making to it. Dr. Francis Wayland thanked him for the speech, expressing the hope that he would deliver many such. Lydia Maria Child thought it magnificent, meeting the requirements of the time with so much intellectual strength and moral heroism, finding nothing in it which offended either her taste or her judgement. Count Gurowski found it grand and beautiful in thought, and not less so in form. John Jay wrote: Thanks for your glorious speech, that will now thrill the American heart to an extent never known before. Rev. R. S. Storrs, Jr., of Brooklyn, N. Y., sent thanks for the speech, unanswerable except by the bludgeon,—a magnificent exhibition not only of mental force and culture, but of Christian and patriotic feeling, of regard for righteousness, and supreme devotion to liberty and to truth. . . . Great pow
eral Butler had had only the slight experience of the muster field, such as that then was, and had wholly missed the valuable discipline of the lower grades of command. The mistake—as was pointed out freely by such acute foreign observers as Count Gurowski and Comte de Paris The latter describes them as the improvised generals. (Civil War in America (translation), I, 165.)—was not in making them officers, but in putting them at once at the top of the ladder. Intended as a compliment, it wa go to Louisiana and do the same thing there. Irvin, p. 56. For Banks's surprise at his appointment, see Gordon's Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain, p. 29. For the view taken of Banks by foreign observers, see Comte de Paris (translation), I, 264; Gurowski's Diary, I, 100, 148, 195. With thirty-nine regiments of infantry, six batteries of artillery and one battalion of cavalry, Banks sailed from New York, under sealed orders, on December 4, and reached Ship Island on Dec. 13, 1862. Unfortunately,
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: no. 19
Boylston place
: later Lyrics --1866; aet. 47 (search)
ious to her; and President Johnson, whom she found not one inclined to much speech. Before the latter interview her prayer was: Let me be neither unskilful nor mean! The visit to Mrs. Eames was a sad one, being at the time of the death of Count Gurowski, a singular man whom she has described in her Reminiscences ; but she met many notable persons, and had much interesting conversation with her host and hostess. She records one or two bits of talk. Mr. Eames saying that Mrs. X. was an inowing: the invitation received by me to read at the Century Club in New York. This reading was hindered by the death of my brother-in-law, J. N. Howe. The death of dear Uncle John. My journey to Washington to get Chev the Greek appointment. Gurowski's death. Attendance at the American Academy of Science at Northampton in August. The editorship of the new weekly. My study of Fichte's Sittenlehre and the appearance of my essay on the Ideal State in the Christian Examiner. My reading at Le
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