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The Daily Dispatch: April 5, 1862., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: November 17, 1863., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Presentation. --The non-commissioned officers and privates of the Purcell Battery have presented to Lieut. Dan'l Hagerty an elegant silver pot, comprising a coffee pot, sugar dish, cream pot and bowl, valued at $300. The following inscription, engraved on one of the pieces, explains itself: "Presented to D. Hagerty, 1st Lieut. Purcell Battery, by the non-commissioned officers and privates, as a token of their esteem for him as a gentleman and officer." This handsome service of silver was rty an elegant silver pot, comprising a coffee pot, sugar dish, cream pot and bowl, valued at $300. The following inscription, engraved on one of the pieces, explains itself: "Presented to D. Hagerty, 1st Lieut. Purcell Battery, by the non-commissioned officers and privates, as a token of their esteem for him as a gentleman and officer." This handsome service of silver was made by Mitchell & Tyler, of this city. It is really a flattering compliment, which is duly appreciated by the recipient.
Economical light --The C. S. patent lard, tallow, or grease lamp, invented by Mr. D. Hagerty, of this city, is one of the most valuable inventions for families that has yet been brought to the notice of the Southern public. The lamp is composed of a tin cylinder, which fits upon an unright wooden stand. At the upper end of the cylinder is a small tin table for holding the wick which is removable at pleasure. The cylinder is filled with tallow or lard and placed over the upright stand. cylinder, which fits upon an unright wooden stand. At the upper end of the cylinder is a small tin table for holding the wick which is removable at pleasure. The cylinder is filled with tallow or lard and placed over the upright stand. When the wick is lighted it will burn ten hours, diffusing more light than a candle, and costing about one-fourth as much. Mr. Hagerty has patented his invention, and we are quite sure every family deprived of gas will look upon him as a public benefactor.