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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 191 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 126 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 98 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 85 1 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 67 13 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 63 5 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 51 13 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 42 12 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative. You can also browse the collection for Halleck or search for Halleck in all documents.

Your search returned 43 results in 9 document sections:

Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, chapter 9 (search)
d from gunboats. Of course, there was much commotion in the Federal camps, but the actual damage done was trifling. Some 40 casualties are reported among the Federals, and two or three among the Confederate artillerists. The next day the Federals established themselves on the South Side. The strategic advantages of a position astraddle of the James River have already been referred to (page 61, Chap. III.), but they were not yet generally appreciated. Fortunately for us, Lincoln and Halleck recalled McClellan and his army to Washington without ever realizing them; although McClellan had tried hard to impress them upon his superiors. Fortunately, too, for us, Gen. S. G. French, in command at Petersburg, saw and appreciated the threat of the position, and immediately began the construction of a line of intrenchments about that city. These intrenchments, in 1864, defeated some attempts at surprise; and at last enabled Beauregard, with two divisions, to withstand the attack of G
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 10: Cedar Mountain (search)
ilitary advisor, and, on July 11, appointed Gen. Halleck commander-in-chief of all the armies of thew this unfortunate selection came to be made: Halleck was at that time the most successful general were before long to find out how slender was Halleck's intellectual capacity, how entirely unmilitd direct control of an army in the field. Halleck arrived in Washington and took charge on Julyf the war, asserts that neither McClellan nor Halleck believed this preposterous story. McClellan is force to only 110,000. Mr. Ropes says that Halleck saw and appreciated McClellan's insincerity, do under such generals as Lee and Jackson. Halleck had visited McClellan on the James soon aftervictory 70 miles off might count for little. Halleck answered that it was unsafe to have a dividedeanwhile, Pope had received instructions from Halleck to make demonstrations toward Gordonsville, wnts under Burnside would soon join him, wired Halleck that, on their arrival, he would cross the Ra
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 11: second Manassas (search)
join him. Lee understood this thoroughly, and Halleck and Pope understood it equally well; but Popeing could have suited Lee's plans better, but Halleck had not taken entire leave of his senses, ands most important correspondence with Lincoln, Halleck, and others. Stuart had gotten Lee's permissnformation was promptly communicated to Pope, Halleck, and the leading generals, who began to guess. He would, perhaps, have done this but that Halleck had ordered him to hold especially the lower d Thoroughfare Gap. At daybreak he had wired Halleck as follows:— We fought a terrific battle ry 1000 — total 20,500. Having telegraphed Halleck that the Confederates were retreating, Pope nd over the same road. Pope, in a despatch to Halleck during the night, had reported his falling bad McClellan. He had graduated at the head of Halleck's class at West Point in 1839, and Halleck waHalleck was well acquainted with his military attainments. Both Stevens and Kearny were favorites in the old
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 12: Boonsboro or South Mountain, and Harper's Ferry (search)
to Tupelo, Miss. He was not followed, and the Federal army under Halleck of 100,000, was dispersed in different directions from Arkansas tohin the fortifications, almost in a state of rout. Col. Kelton of Halleck's staff, sent to find out the actual state of affairs, reported th both armies, Pope was left without a man. Yet neither Lincoln nor Halleck had confidence in McClellan, and there was great reluctance to usethe day of his triumph, and one of humiliation to both Lincoln and Halleck. Yet McClellan was out of place. He would have been an excelleted them to withdraw. McClellan had desired to withdraw them, but Halleck objected that there was then no way by which Miles could withdraw. of the opportunity chance had given him, or did not choose to let Halleck know it. His letters to them seem vague and noncommittal. He cannr, however, instead of returning them, forwarded White's letter to Halleck's office, calling it a strange arrangement, and asks shall the wag
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 14: fall of 1862 (search)
cided to take the Valley route, for fear of Lee's advancing into Md. and Pa. if it was left uncovered. Both Lincoln and Halleck thought his fears groundless and his caution excessive. Neither of them believed the Confederate army to be as immense and which wanted not only the head of McClellan, but that of Porter. On Nov. 5 the President wrote an order authorizing Halleck, in his own discretion, to relieve McClellan, and to place Burnside in command of the army. Porter was also to be relieand of the 5th corps, and to be succeeded by Hooker. On the same date these formal orders were prepared and signed by Halleck, but they were not promulgated for two days. The designation of Burnside to succeed McClellan was a great surprise tohad feared that Lee would overwhelm any small force which should cross before he was prepared to support it. Lincoln and Halleck, indeed, had only consented to the movement via Fredericksburg with the understanding that the army should possess itsel
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 16: Gettysburg: the first day (search)
, soon after the battle of Chancellorsville, in a council between Mr. Lincoln, Halleck, and Stanton, that Hooker should never again be intrusted with the conduct of win a great victory. Meanwhile, as he was not to be allowed to fight, both Halleck and Lincoln refused his sensible proposition to cross the Rappahannock, and Liou not break him? Hooker would have only been too glad to try, but Stanton and Halleck were on guard over him, and practically the Army of the Potomac was bound handfrom the Washington lines, as his whole army was now in front of the city, but Halleck refused to allow it. He then proposed to throw a strong force across the mountr's Ferry to unite with the 12th corps, which was to lead the movement. Again Halleck interposed. He refused the troops on the absurd ground that Maryland Heights overnment, and tendered his resignation June 27. It was just what Stanton and Halleck had been seeking, and was no sooner received than accepted, and prompt measure
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
ught up to the army, and a more stringent police enforced. Meanwhile, Lee made two efforts to take the offensive against Grant's right flank and rear. On the 6th, he sent Early on the north of Matadequin Creek, and on the 7th he made an attempt south of the same. In each case swamps were found intervening, which prevented anything being accomplished. A few days after the battle, while Grant was still in his state of indecision and the make believe of siege operations was going on, Halleck suggested to him the investment of Richmond on the north bank of the James. It was seriously considered, as offering greater security to Washington, but finally rejected. On June 5, Hunter, in the Valley, who had succeeded Milroy, defeated Jones, who had succeeded Breckenridge. As soon as Lee learned of this, he ordered Breckenridge to return and take with him the troops he had brought to Lee at Hanover Junction. On June 12, he took the bold move of detaching Early's whole corps and s
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 22: the Mine (search)
us losses, but there are no reports except for Colquitt's, who, like the rest of Hoke's division, held a portion of the line not attacked. His casualties were 4 killed and 27 wounded. The total Confederate loss is given in the Tabular Statement of the Medical Department as: 400 killed, 600 wounded, and 200 missing, which is perhaps between 200 and 300 too small. The Military Court censured Gens. Burnside, Ledlie, Ferrero, Willcox, and Col. Bliss, commanding a brigade. They also expressed their opinion: — That explicit orders should have been given assigning one officer to the command of all the troops intended to engage in the assault when the Commanding General was not present in person to witness the operations. There is nothing in the Reports to explain this. Grant sent a despatch to Halleck at 10 A. M., saying that he was just from the front, and about that time Humphreys reports that Meade, with Grant's concurrence, ordered the cessation of all offensive movements
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 23: the fall of 1864 (search)
n the army of his intemperance. Early in July, after some preliminary correspondence, indicating a doubt how Butler would relish any interference with himself, Halleck issued an order assigning the troops under him to the command of W. F. Smith, and sending Butler to Fortress Monroe. On receipt of this order, he said to his staance, the political situation was now so improved by the successes elsewhere that Grant was no longer afraid to exercise his authority, and on Jan. 4, he wrote to Halleck demanding Butler's official head. With a celerity indicative of the pleasure with which both Halleck and Lincoln complied with the request, it was presented to hHalleck and Lincoln complied with the request, it was presented to him. On Jan. 7, in General Orders No. 1, By direction of the President, Maj.-Gen. Butler was relieved from command and ordered to repair to Lowell, Mass. On Jan. 5, a new expedition, under the command of Porter and Gen. Terry, set sail, carrying about 9500 infantry and a heavy siege-train. It arrived before Fort Fisher and opene