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Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 191 19 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 126 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 98 12 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 85 1 Browse Search
William A. Crafts, Life of Ulysses S. Grant: His Boyhood, Campaigns, and Services, Military and Civil. 67 13 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 63 5 Browse Search
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana 51 13 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 42 12 Browse Search
Owen Wister, Ulysses S. Grant 40 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 37. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 36 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 23, 1862., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Halleck or search for Halleck in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 2 document sections:

A card from Gen. Beauregard Augusta June 21. --The Mobile Evening News, of the 19th inst., contains a card from Gen. Beauregard denying Halleck's dispatch about Pope's capturing 10,000 prisoners, &c. He says: "Gen. Pope was careful in his advance after my army had retired from each successive position. The retreat was conducted with great order and precision, and must be looked upon by the country as equivalent to a brilliant victory. The actual number of prisoners taken was a"Gen. Pope was careful in his advance after my army had retired from each successive position. The retreat was conducted with great order and precision, and must be looked upon by the country as equivalent to a brilliant victory. The actual number of prisoners taken was about equal on both sides, and but few of the enemy were captured. There were only seven engines taken, and they were damaged. I attest that all we lost at Corinth would not amount to one day's expense of Halleck's army."
n in the West. "P. W. A." the army correspondent of the Savannah Republican, in his last letter, gives the following information: It is doubtful whether Halleck will attempt any serious offensive demonstration, at least by land, for some months to come. The undisputed control of the Mississippi river, which he will soon ng of cars to conform to the guage of the roads, will probably constitute the summer work of the Federal army. The lack of water, if nothing else, will deter Halleck from any attempt to overtake Beauregard. It has already been found necessary to move our army down to Tupelo — not Saltillo, as stated in my last letter — just failroad. It is situated in a rich, fruitful, and well-watered country, and is tha seat of a wealthy and intelligent population. It hardly seems possible for Halleck to keep his army at Corinth. Before he get possession of the place he found it necessary, according to reports, to supply his troops with water forced up through