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Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 38 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 36 2 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 4 36 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 3 16 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1. 14 0 Browse Search
James Parton, Horace Greeley, T. W. Higginson, J. S. C. Abbott, E. M. Hoppin, William Winter, Theodore Tilton, Fanny Fern, Grace Greenwood, Mrs. E. C. Stanton, Women of the age; being natives of the lives and deeds of the most prominent women of the present gentlemen 13 1 Browse Search
John G. Nicolay, A Short Life of Abraham Lincoln, condensed from Nicolay and Hayes' Abraham Lincoln: A History 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 6, 1861., [Electronic resource] 11 3 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 1 9 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: October 16, 1863., [Electronic resource] 7 1 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
eremiah S. Black Attorney-General: Edwin M. Stanton (Pa.), appointed Dec. 20, 1860. Department of the Interior. Secretary of the Interior: Jacob Thompson* (Miss.) Post-office. Postmaster-General: Aaron V. Brown (Tenn.), died Mar. 8, 1859 Postmaster-General: Joseph Holt (Ky.), appointed Mar. 14, 1859 Postmaster-General: Horatio King (Maine), appointed Feb. 12, 1861. Ii. The Lincoln Administration. (1861-1865.) President: Abraham Lincoln (Ill.) Vice-President: Hannibal Hamlin (Maine). Department of State. Secretary of State: William H. Seward (New York). War Department. Secretary of War: Simon Cameron (Pa.) Secretary of War: Edwin M. Stanton (Pa.), appointed Jan. 15, 1862. Navy Department. Secretary of the Navy: Gideon Welles (Conn.) Treasury Department. Secretary of the Treasury: Salmon P. Chase (Ohio) Secretary of the Treasury: W. P. Fessenden (Maine), appointed July 1, 1864 Secretary of the Treasury: Hugh McCulloch (Ind.),
Francis B. Carpenter, Six Months at the White House, XX. (search)
f the profoundest peace, for the person at the head of the nation to remain so unprotected. There are two dangers, I wound up by saying; the danger of deliberate political assassination, and the mere brute violence of insanity. Mr. Lincoln heard me through with a smile, his hands locked across his knees, his body rocking back and forth,--the common indication that he was amused. Now, as to political assassination, he said, do you think the Richmond people would like to have Hannibal Hamlin here any better than myself? In that one alternative, I have an insurance on my life worth half the prairie land of Illinois. And beside, --this more gravely,--if there were such a plot, and they wanted to get at me, no vigilance could keep them out. We are so mixed up in our affairs, that — no matter what the system established — a conspiracy to assassinate, if such there were, could easily obtain a pass to see me for any one or more of its instruments. To betray fear of this, by
the convention the world is already well familiar. On the first ballot Seward led, but was closely followed by Lincoln; on the second Lincoln gained amazingly; on the third the race was an even one until the dramatic change by Carter, of Ohio, when Lincoln, swinging loose, swept grandly to the front. The cannon planted on the roof of the Wigwam belched forth a boom across the Illinois prairies. The sound was taken up and reverberated from Maine to California. With the nomination of Hannibal Hamlin, of Maine, the convention adjourned. The delegates — victorious and vanquished alike — turned their steps homeward, and the great campaign of 1860 had begun. The day before the nomination the editor of the Springfield Journal arrived in Chicago with a copy of the Missouri Democrat, in which Lincoln had marked three passages referring to Seward's position on the slavery question. On the margin of the paper he had written in pencil, I agree with Seward in his Irrepressible Conflict, bu
e spell. Before the lapse of a minute, David K. Cartter sprang upon his chair and reported a change of four Ohio votes from Chase to Lincoln. Then a teller shouted a name toward the skylight, and the boom of cannon from the roof of the Wigwam announced the nomination and started the cheering of the overjoyed Illinoisans down the long Chicago streets; while in the Wigwam, delegation after delegation changed its vote to the victor amid a tumult of hurrahs. When quiet was somewhat restored, Mr. Evarts, speaking for New York and for Seward, moved to make the nomination unanimous, and Mr. Browning gracefully returned the thanks of Illinois for the honor the convention had conferred upon the State. In the afternoon the convention completed its work by nominating Hannibal Hamlin of Maine for Vice-President; and as the delegates sped homeward in the night trains, they witnessed, in the bonfires and cheering crowds at the stations, that a memorable presidential campaign was already begun.
nt parties of the country for the presidential contest of 1860; and presented the unusual occurrence of an appeal to the voters of the several States by four distinct political organizations. In the order of popular strength which they afterward developed, they were: I. The Republican party, whose platform declared in substance that slavery was wrong, and that its further extension should be prohibited by Congress. Its candidates were Abraham Lincoln of Illinois for President, and Hannibal Hamlin of Maine for Vice-President. 2. The Douglas wing of the Democratic party, which declared indifference whether slavery were right or wrong, extended or prohibited, and proposed to permit the people of a Territory to decide whether they would prevent or establish it. Its candidates were Stephen A. Douglas of Illinois for President, and Herschel V. Johnson of Georgia for Vice-President. 3. The Buchanan wing of the Democratic party, which declared that slavery was right and beneficial, a
n, he could also satisfy two other points of the representative principle, the claims of locality, and the elements of former party divisions now joined in the newly organized Republican party. With Seward from New York, Cameron from Pennsylvania, Chase from Ohio, and himself from Illinois, the four leading free States had each a representative. With Bates from Missouri, the South could not complain of being wholly excluded from the cabinet. New England was properly represented by Vice-President Hamlin. When, after the inauguration, Smith from Indiana, Welles from Connecticut, and Blair from Maryland were added to make up the seven cabinet members, the local distribution between East and West, North and South, was in no wise disturbed. It was, indeed, complained that in this arrangement there were four former Democrats, and only three former Whigs; to which Lincoln laughingly replied that he had been a Whig, and would be there to make the number even. It is not likely that th
mary methods. When Mr. Delano of Ohio made the customary motion to proceed to the nomination, Simon Cameron moved as a substitute the renomination of Lincoln and Hamlin by acclamation. A long wrangle ensued on the motion to lay this substitute on the table, which was finally brought to an end by the cooler heads, who desired thaor Lincoln; the announcement being greeted with a storm of cheering which lasted many minutes. The principal names mentioned for the vice-presidency were Hannibal Hamlin, the actual incumbent; Andrew Johnson of Tennessee; and Daniel S. Dickinson of New York. Besides these, General L. H. Rousseau had the vote of his own State-avor of Mr. Johnson, who was not only a Democrat, but also a citizen of a slave State. The first ballot showed that Mr. Johnson had received two hundred votes, Mr. Hamlin one hundred and fifty, and Mr. Dickinson one hundred and eight; and before the result was announced almost the whole convention turned their votes to Johnson; w
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 1: secession. (search)
ion. He declared that our institutions were in danger from the hostility of the fixed majorities of the North; and recommended the calling of a State convention, and the purchase of arms and material of war. A lingering doubt about the result of the presidential contest appears in the formal choice by the Legislature, of electors who would vote for Breckinridge and Lane. But that doubt was short-lived. The morning of November 7th brought the certain news of the election of Lincoln and Hamlin on the previous day, and the rejoicings which would have been uttered over their defeat became jubilations that their success offered the long-coveted pretext for disunion. From this time forth everything was managed to swell the revolutionary furor. The Legislature immediately ordered a convention, made appropriations, passed military bills. The federal office-holders, with much public flourish of their patriotic sacrifice, resigned their offices. Military companies enrolled themselv
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Chapter 6: the call to arms. (search)
es, and changed its editorials from a tone of sneering lament to a fierce and incessant war-cry. Every prominent individual in the whole North was called or came voluntarily to prompt espousal of the Union cause by public letter or speech. Ex-President Buchanan, ex-President Pierce, Edward Everett, General Cass, Archbishop Hughes, Mayor Fernando Wood, John A. Dix, Wendell Phillips, Robert J. Walker, Wm. M. Evarts, Edward D. Baker, David Dudley Field, John J. Crittenden, Caleb Gushing, Hannibal Hamlin, Democrats and Republicans, conservatives and radicals, natives and foreigners, Catholics and Protestants, Maine and Oregon, all uttered a common call to their countrymen to come to the defence of the Constitution, the Government, and the Union. Of all these recognized public leaders, however, the most energetic and powerful, next to Lincoln, was Stephen A. Douglas, who in the late election had received 1,128,049 Northern votes, and 163,525 Southern votes for President. As already men
John G. Nicolay, The Outbreak of Rebellion, Index. (search)
inesville, Va., 181 Gamble, Hamilton R., 125 Garnett, General, 146, 154 Georgia, attitude of, with regard to secession, 2, 8, 12; secession of, 13 et seq. Gist, Governor of South Carolina, his circular letter, 1, 8, 27 Gosport Navy Yard, destruction of, 96 et seq. Grafton, 142 et seq., 146 Grant, General U. S., 134 Great Bethel, Va., engagement at, 172 Green, Captain, 117 Griffin, Captain, 188, 191, 192 Guthrie, Colonel, 131 H. Hagerstown, Md., 157 Hamlin, Hannibal, 76 Harney, General, 119 et seq. Harper's Ferry, United States Armory at, 83; capture of, by rebels, 95, 98; retaken from the rebels, 157; weakness of, 158; destroyed by Johnston, 161 Harrisburg, 100 Hayne, I. W., 35, 37 Heintzelman, General S. P., commands Third Division on advance to Manassas, 174 Henry House, the, 187 Hickman, Ky., 134 Hicks, Governor, 83, 88 et seq., 94 Houston, Governor, his scheme of independent sovereignty for Texas, 13; deposed from
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