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p. The South Carolina College buildings, and Lunatic Asylum escaped. It is said that the firing was done before General Sherman himself reached the city, and that he afterwards expressed regret at it; but of course all that will pass for hypocrisy. After Sherman reached the city, he posted guards, with orders to shoot any soldier caught setting fire to a house; and our informant says three Yankee soldiers were shot. Child's factory, near the city, was burnt. General Sherman occupied General Hampton's house as his headquarters. When the enemy went into Columbia, a number of white and Union flags were found flying, but the Yankee soldiers did not seem to respect them much, and told those who sought protection in that way that they were found "in d — n bad company." But when the enemy left the city, a number of citizens (supposed to be Northerners and foreigners) went off with them, the enemy furnishing transportation for women and baggage. At Winnsboro', about twenty buil
office of the Fayetteville Observer--a lying, truculent sheet, that well deserves its fate. Kilpatrick's defeat by Hampton. The letters could not well pass over the defeat of Kilpatrick by Hampton, but they try to cover it up as well as poHampton, but they try to cover it up as well as possible. It appears that Kilpatrick started, on the 9th, to "intercept" Hampton, who was protecting Hardee's rear, and, getting in front of him, waited for him to come up, which he soon did. The letter says: The attack was made in three columnHampton, who was protecting Hardee's rear, and, getting in front of him, waited for him to come up, which he soon did. The letter says: The attack was made in three columns. Wheeler led the right, Hampton the centre, and Butler the left, and was perfectly irresistible. Kilpatrick's first line, under Lieutenant-Colonel Way, was actually ridden over; headquarters and artillery captured; and at one time the entire camHampton the centre, and Butler the left, and was perfectly irresistible. Kilpatrick's first line, under Lieutenant-Colonel Way, was actually ridden over; headquarters and artillery captured; and at one time the entire camp, including the entire staff, and Colonel Spencer, commanding the Third brigade, were in the enemy's possession. But General Kilpatrick made his escape, joined the brigade of Colonel Spencer, which was falling back on feet, stubbornly disputing ev
The Hampton Legion. --This superb command has given to the Confederacy seven generals. Hampton, its originator and colonel, is now a lieutenant-general. Stephen D. Lee, formerly a captain of its artillery, is also a lieutenant general. Butler, a captain, is now a major-general. The lamented Pettigrew, first a private in the Washington infantry, fell at the head of his North Carolina brigade.--Gary, a captain of infantry, is brigadier of cavalry, in command around Richmond. Connor, once a captain, is also a brigadier, minus a leg, and Logan, who started as a lieutenant, has followed the honorable career of his comrades, and received his stars and wreath.--Columbia Carolinian.
town and retreat to Rockingham. He was then ordered by General Johnston to fall back upon Fayetteville. On reaching the vicinity, on Wednesday, the 8th, he took a position six miles from town, where he was reinforced by the command of Lieutenant-General Hampton. It was believed that a stand would be made and the place defended. It did seem that the splendid arsenal, the seven cotton and three oil factories, etc., made it a place of sufficient importance to the Government to make a more detercolumn and passes through it. Then, after a momentary pause, the column closes, and on they come. The next moment a shell is thrown into their midst; the shell explodes; there is confusion; another, and another, and the street is deserted. General Hampton then discovered that they were endeavoring to reach a sedan to the left of the bridge. To do this they had to pass over an open field. The gun was moved to a point which commanded the field, and a few well-directed shots completed the evac
From North Carolina. We are still without official advices from North Carolina later than General Johnston's report of the battle of Bentonsville, which we published more than a week ago. When last heard from, Sherman was at Goldsboro', and we think it likely he is still there, resting and recruiting his men after their tramp through South Carolina. The Yankee papers say he will next direct his columns against Raleigh. Four hundred and eighty of Kilpatrick's men, captured by Hampton at Fayetteville, reached this city yesterday. They constituted, by all odds, the nastiest lot of Yankee prisoners that have darkened the streets of this city during the war. It is scarcely possible to conceive how men could be so filthy, and live. Evidently, they had all been strangers to soap, water and combs since they set out from Atlanta last summer. From Charleston. Recent advices from Charleston state that the British subjects in Charleston have had the following order issu
Negro schools in Richmond. --The Rev. Mr. Clayton, on last Sunday, delivered a discourse upon freedmen in a Universalist Church in New York city. The Tribune says of it: "He described the different schools in Richmond, Norfolk, Hampton, Alexandria and Washington, and read the reports of their principals, with such remarks as were appended by the superintendent, which showed them to be in a most satisfactory condition, under the direction of Miss White and Miss Howe. "One in particular, held in the Old African Church of Richmond, had seven hundred day scholars; an evening school was attached for the older and more advanced scholars; a sort of high school, under the direction of Miss Hancock, for preparation of colored teachers. Miss Hancock has two assistant (colored), aged twelve and fifteen respectively. The school was entirely self-sustaining, the teaching being gratuitous. "General Howard had promised that no distinction should be made in regard to the pecu
colored people be subjected to an additional tax, the revenue from which to be appropriated to the benefit of colored persons in destitute circumstances. Mails in Virginia. The Postmaster-General last evening issued the following orders for mail service in Virginia, to commence the 1st of January next: of "Pittsylvania Courthouse to Lynchburg twice a week; Pittsylvania Courthouse to Danville three times a week; Pittsylvania Courthouse to Glade Hill once a week; Old Point Comfort to Hampton six times a week; Fredericksburg, by Chancellorsville, Wilderness, Locust Grove, Verdiersville and Unionville to Orange Courthouse twice a week; Farmville to Buckingham Courthouse twice a week; Mattoax to Winterpock twice a week; Genilo to Cumberland Courthouse twice a week; Lawrenceville to Lawrenceville once a week; Farmville to Pemberton twice a week; Jerusalem to Petersburg twice a week; York-town to Mathews Courthouse once a week; Red House to Red House once a week; Pamplin's Depot to
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