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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 30 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 16 4 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 4 0 Browse Search
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865 4 0 Browse Search
George P. Rowell and Company's American Newspaper Directory, containing accurate lists of all the newspapers and periodicals published in the United States and territories, and the dominion of Canada, and British Colonies of North America., together with a description of the towns and cities in which they are published. (ed. George P. Rowell and company) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 1, April, 1902 - January, 1903 4 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 1: ancestry. (search)
to meet the question of serving under the flag of the United States or of obeying the will of Virginia, he drew his sword in defense of his mother Commonwealth. When the war was declared with England in 1812, Henry Lee was living in Alexandria, having moved there to facilitate the education of his children; he was offered, and accepted at once, a major general's commission in the army. Before entering upon his duties he went to Baltimore on business, and while there visited the house of Mr. Hanson, the editor of the Federal Republican. When he was about to leave he found the house surrounded by an angry mob, who were offended with the editor for his articles in opposition to the war; as his friend's life was threatened, he determined to assist him in resisting the attack of the mob. The results of that night proved nearly fatal to General Lee, and were disgraceful to party spirit. The injuries he received at the hands of the excited mob prevented him from entering upon the campaig
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 62 (search)
field directly in front of the position of the enemy, who immediately opened on us from a battery to our front and right. I immediately threw out Company A, Lieutenant Hanson, as skirmishers to cover that part of our front and right flank, and sent word to Colonel Wallace, who was near the left of the regiment, that our right was g, a-d in the afternoon were ordered to relieve the skirmishers of the Thirty-second Indiana, covering the front of the brigade, which I did with Company A, Lieutenant Hanson. Our skirmishers drove the skirmishers of the enemy into a line of rail barricades directly in front of their main line of works, with a loss to us of Lieut commanding, and Company F, Lieutenant Glover, deployed as skirmishers, and during the night built a line of works. Our losses in this day's operations were Lieutenant Hanson, Company A, slightly wounded; Lieutenant Donner, Company E, severely wounded, and 9 enlisted men killed and 44 wounded. On the morning of the 22d we were rel
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Murfreesboro. (search)
t of Adams; Palmer on the left of Preston, and Hanson forming the left of the line, with his left ret bank of the river and slightly in advance of Hanson's left. Brigadier-General Jackson having re allow. About six hundred yards in front of Hanson's center was an eminence which it was deemed iand Ninth Kentucky, and Cobb's battery, all of Hanson's brigade, was ordered to take and hold this hnd formed on the ground originally occupied by Hanson's brigade. Jackson was moved to the west sideiversion in favor of our left, my line, except Hanson's brigade, was put in motion in the direction morning Palmer was in position on the right of Hanson. No general engagement occurred on this day, rough a thick wood about 500 yards in front of Hanson's position and extended to the river. Directit formed A little less than a right angle with Hanson's line, from which the center of the position,with the army, the premature death of Brigadier-General Hanson, who received a mortal wound at the m[4 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 5. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of Colonel Gibson of operations of Adams' brigade. (search)
reckinridge, our division commander, on the right of Stone river. I was placed in position by yourself, about one hundred and fifty yards in the rear of Brigadier-General Hanson's brigade, as a supporting line in the charge to be made. In obedience to orders from General Breckinridge, I posted a reserve, consisting of the Thirre drawing. We drove in his skirmishers from the opposite side of the river. I then rode forward to the first line in the woods on the right to consult with General Hanson as to the particular moment when the second line should come to his support. I had scarcely reached him when he was struck, and, I observed, so seriously wounded as to disable him from conferring with me. I determined not to engage the second line until the first gave way. General Hanson had hardly fallen, however, when his line began to yield, and after a few moments many of his men were falling to the rear. I saw that they needed support, and going back to the second line, instant
eamer Harriet Pinckney, from Bermuda, arrived at Halifax, N. S., having on board C. L. Vallandigham.--at seven o'clock this morning, John Morgan, with four thousand cavalry, attacked the Twentieth Kentucky infantry, four hundred strong, under Colonel Hanson, at Lebanon, Kentucky. After a seven hours fight, Morgan's forces commenced burning the town, setting fire to the railroad depot and six or seven houses. Colonel Hanson then surrendered, and Morgan's forces left in the direction of Spring. Colonel Hanson then surrendered, and Morgan's forces left in the direction of Spring. field.--(Docs. 47 and 103.) A battle took place near Bolton, Miss., between the National forces under General W. T. Sherman, and the rear-guard of the rebels under Joe Johnston, in which the latter were compelled to surrender their entire force. The Union loss was very slight, while the number of rebels captured amounted to over two thousand.--General James G. Blunt, having under his command portions of the Second and Sixth Kansas, Third Wisconsin, and Fourteenth Kansas regiments, left Fo
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 3: political affairs.--Riots in New York.--Morgan's raid North of the Ohio. (search)
ery of her sex, she was several times mustered out of the service, and then she would re-enlist in another regiment. Her name was Lizzie Compton. From Green River Morgan moved rapidly upon Lebanon, then occupied by a thin regiment, under Colonel Hanson. His demand for a surrender being refused,. the raiders tried for several hours to capture the place. Then they charged into the town, set it on fire, and captured Hanson and his men,, with a battery. In this conflict Morgan's brother was Hanson and his men,, with a battery. In this conflict Morgan's brother was killed. At dusk, the Confederates left the ruined village, pushed rapidly northward, by way of Bardstown, in a drenching rain, and, on the evening of the 7th, July, 1863. their advance reached the Ohio, at Brandenburg, about forty miles below Louisville. Morgan had fought and plundered on his way from Lebanon, and his ranks had been swelled by Kentucky secessionists to more than four thousand men, with ten guns. The advance of Rosecrans against Bragg at about this time had prevented the co-o
ergo exposure in the mountains, and laugh at the idea of my obtaining a scanty subsistence in this exhausted region. Let them hear from me that no honorable sacrifice is too great for the purchase of liberty. I had rather tread the wilderness a free man than to inhabit the palace a bondman. How much more glorious was William Tell, the Swiss mountaineer, than the pampered slave of Gessler! How much more noble and infinitely more comfortable are the chains that fetter the limbs of Buckner, Hanson, and their brave comrades than those which are worn unconsciously or ingloriously by the Kentuckians who submit to the usurper Lincoln or his generals. I can tell you and these people who amuse themselves at my expense that I look upon the captivity of my son (who languishes in an Ohio prison) as glorious when compared to their condition; for I would rather see him rot in a dungeon or die ten thousand deaths than to live one moment after an ignoble compromise of his constitutional rights.
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 34. attack on Santa Rosa Island. October 9, 1861. (search)
ggage, clothing, and ready money. All but the money and clothes, however, were replaced from the fort the next day, and the men are now comfortably quartered again. Statements of three negro fugitives. The following is an account of the attack as given by three contrabands who were sent to the North in the McClellan, by Colonel Brown, from Fort Pickens. They are Peter Dyson, an intelligent black man, about thirty-five years of age, who, with his wife, a yellow woman, escaped from a Mrs. Hanson, a boarding-house keeper in Pensacola; they got to Fort Pickens in a skiff about two and a half months ago. Dyson is a first-rate mason and bricklayer, and has worked on the Government forts at Pensacola for the last twenty years. The third is a young colored married woman, about twenty-five years old, who was owned by Cole Crosby, and hired out to a Mrs. Wm. O'Brien, at Pensacola. She left with two men in a sloop, and while beating up for Fort Pickens was fallen in with by the Colorado
nce yesterday, and had some pretty sharp fighting for fully two hours. We drove the enemy's pickets, outposts, etc., before us for near half a mile, when we found them in force. We then had some of the tallest kind of musketry fighting, enough to convince us that the enemy had a large force opposed to us. We tried to draw the fire of their artillery, and for this purpose we advanced upon them again and again, but our numbers were not strong enough, and we were finally obliged to retire. Col. Hanson, of the Twentieth Kentucky, did well, as he kept in advance of his regiment, urging his skirmishers forward to engage the enemy more closely. Captain Joseph T. Wheeler, who, by the chances of war, found himself in command of the noble First Kentucky, did well with his regiment, which, as it was the first and longest engaged, suffered considerable loss in wounded. The reconnoissance was completely successful, and fully answered the purposes for which it was intended, as we only wished to
nce yesterday, and had some pretty sharp fighting for fully two hours. We drove the enemy's pickets, outposts, etc., before us for near half a mile, when we found them in force. We then had some of the tallest kind of musketry fighting, enough to convince us that the enemy had a large force opposed to us. We tried to draw the fire of their artillery, and for this purpose we advanced upon them again and again, but our numbers were not strong enough, and we were finally obliged to retire. Col. Hanson, of the Twentieth Kentucky, did well, as he kept in advance of his regiment, urging his skirmishers forward to engage the enemy more closely. Captain Joseph T. Wheeler, who, by the chances of war, found himself in command of the noble First Kentucky, did well with his regiment, which, as it was the first and longest engaged, suffered considerable loss in wounded. The reconnoissance was completely successful, and fully answered the purposes for which it was intended, as we only wished to
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