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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 218 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 163 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 145 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 127 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 117 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 113 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 109 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 102 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 93 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for William J. Hardee or search for William J. Hardee in all documents.

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ve commands of Generals John B. Hood and William J. Hardee. But General Polk was on his way to joithe position. But so deadly was the fire from Hardee's corps that Butterfield was unable to hold ithnston's army corps, with Johnston himself and Hardee, another corps commander, was studying Shermanrs reconnoitering the new position. So, while Hardee was pointing to his comrade and his chief the m all. On the 14th of June, Generals Johnston, Hardee, and Polk rode up the slope of Pine Mountain tattack on the morning of the 22d. He sent General Hardee on a long night march around the extreme fprevent them from sending aid to McPherson. Hardee was delayed in his fifteen-mile night march, aes of supplies. On July 28th, Hood again sent Hardee out from his entrenchments to attack the Army attempted to block the march on Jonesboro, and Hardee was sent with his and S. D. Lee's Corps to attportunity to move upon Sherman's right flank. Hardee's attack failed, and this necessitated the eva
ve commands of Generals John B. Hood and William J. Hardee. But General Polk was on his way to joithe position. But so deadly was the fire from Hardee's corps that Butterfield was unable to hold ithnston's army corps, with Johnston himself and Hardee, another corps commander, was studying Shermanrs reconnoitering the new position. So, while Hardee was pointing to his comrade and his chief the m all. On the 14th of June, Generals Johnston, Hardee, and Polk rode up the slope of Pine Mountain tattack on the morning of the 22d. He sent General Hardee on a long night march around the extreme fprevent them from sending aid to McPherson. Hardee was delayed in his fifteen-mile night march, aes of supplies. On July 28th, Hood again sent Hardee out from his entrenchments to attack the Army attempted to block the march on Jonesboro, and Hardee was sent with his and S. D. Lee's Corps to attportunity to move upon Sherman's right flank. Hardee's attack failed, and this necessitated the eva
The defense of Savannah. The task of General Hardee in defending Savannah was one of peculiar herman would move at once upon Charleston, but Hardee argued that the Union army would have to estabo hold the whole line, were soon overpowered. Hardee now had to consider more narrowly the best timt Savannah. The defender of Savannah: General Hardee. Fort McAllister--the last barrier to th Railroad by strong entrenchments, held by General Hardee's men. Sherman perceived that a frontal atture of Savannnah. With much foresight, General Hardee had not waited for Sherman's approach, but to carry him northward. He first called on Hardee to surrender the city, with a threat of bombardment. Hardee refused. Sherman hesitated to open with his guns because of the bloodshed it would o pleaded with President Davis to reenforce General Hardee, who occupied the city. Hardee thereupon gagement came at Averysboro on March 16th. General Hardee, having taken a strong position, made a de[6 more...]
herman would move at once upon Charleston, but Hardee argued that the Union army would have to estabous deep rivers and swamps of South Carolina. Hardee's task therefore was to hold Savannah just as o hold the whole line, were soon overpowered. Hardee now had to consider more narrowly the best tim Railroad by strong entrenchments, held by General Hardee's men. Sherman perceived that a frontal atat it was weak if attacked from the rear. General Hardee's brave little force of 10,000 were soon t fortified and he refrained from assault. General Hardee, sent by Hood from Tennessee, had command to carry him northward. He first called on Hardee to surrender the city, with a threat of bombardment. Hardee refused. Sherman hesitated to open with his guns because of the bloodshed it would o 21st he was greatly relieved to discover that Hardee had decided not to defend the city, that he hagagement came at Averysboro on March 16th. General Hardee, having taken a strong position, made a de[6 more...]
.-Gen. McPherson; Army of the Ohio, Maj.-Gen. John M. Schofield, Elliott's and Stoneman's Cavalry; Confed., Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. E. Johnston, commanding; Hardee's Corps, Hood's Corps, Wheeler's Cavalry. Fort Morgan fallen after a stubborn defense Among the decisive events of 1864 was the Union victory of Mobile Bayand wounded. August 31, 1864 and Sept. 1, 1864: Jonesboro, Ga. Union, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Sixteenth, Seventeenth Corps and Cavalry Corps; Confed., Gen Hardee's Corps, Gen. S. D. Lee's Corps, Army of Tennessee, Gen. J. B. Hood, commanding. Losses: Union, 1149 killed and wounded; Confed., 1400 killed, wounded, acord found. December 10-21, 1864: siege of Savannah, Ga. Union, Fourteenth, Fifteenth, Seventeenth, and Twentieth Corps of Sherman's army; Confed., Gen. W. J. Hardee's command. Losses: Union, 200 killed and wounded; Confed. (estimate), 800 killed, wounded, and missing. December 12-21, 1864: Federal raid from B