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Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 218 4 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 163 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 145 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 127 3 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 117 21 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 113 3 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 3: The Decisive Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 109 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 102 2 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 97 3 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 93 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1. You can also browse the collection for William J. Hardee or search for William J. Hardee in all documents.

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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 7: at West Point as instructor, 1857-61; the outbreak of the Civil War (search)
rruption for fifty years. Our commandant in 1857, Lieutenant Colonel William J. Hardee, had a family of two daughters and one son. One day Colonel Hardee and myself had a long walk together beyond the limits of our reservation. He had previously expressed a desire that I should t so began an intimacy with the family that was only interrupted by Hardee's relief from duty before the end of my term. He declared that he d Delafield and to manage the academy during the war period. Colonel Hardee's academy service as commandant of cadets expired September 8, the resignation of his army commission was tendered and accepted. Hardee's course in this matter produced quite a sensation at West Point. Lof Pennsylvania, almost the first to fall at Gettysburg, succeeding Hardee at the academy, commanded the cadets till after my departure. His to the Union, clearly in contrast with the sentiments expressed by Hardee, and his ardor in hastening forward from the academy the higher cla
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 29: battle of Resaca and the Oostanaula (search)
a bold charge to retake them, but our men promptly and successfully repelled the charge. Finally, the picks and spades were brought up by our soldiers, and our defenders dug their way to the guns. At last these costly trophies were permanently brought into our possession. The Confederate commander names this as an advanced battery of Hood's, put out beyond his front, on the morning of May 15, 80 or 100 yards. We now know that Hood, in front of Hooker, had been constantly reinforced by Hardee and Polk, and that just as Hooker started his column Hood had pushed out his attacking lines, so that the first shock beyond the Confederate trenches was severe, each side having taken the offensive. Finally, Hovey led a movement at double-quick, and encountered a dreadful fire, but succeeded in routing the Confederates' obstinate attacking column and driving it to its own cover; I was watching and my corps bore its part. Artillery and musketry had been kept active all along my front and
Strengthened by a small reenforcement, he located Hardee's corps so as to meet all the Army of the Cumberlans quarters. General Hood was with him, but not General Hardee. The two officers, General Hood taking the leaer their positions untenable in an hour or two. Hardee's note is of interest. He wrote: At Cassvilleir troops, and produce that inability. Lieutenant General Hardee, who arrived after this decision, remonstradquarters in citizen Moore's house, at which point Hardee also had his. This house was near the point where ton the 23d, before Wheeler's return, he had ordered Hardee to march at once by New Hope Church to the road leaa route farther to the left, and Hood was to follow Hardee's march the day following. By the 25th, Sherman'he Adirondacks, where Johnston chose his position. Hardee was put at Dallas, Hood at New Hope, and Polk between them, nearer to Hood than Hardee, causing some thin lines. Yes, there was here great natural strength li
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 31: battle of Pickett's Mill (search)
rd until he had cleared his entire front up to Hardee's works. From that time on there was no peacein the face of an active and energetic enemy. Hardee was pressing his lines constantly, probably inorts of Walker and Cheatham had the effect, as Hardee intended, namely, to keep Dodge and Davis in pmade. On the 30th, shortly before midnight, Hardee made a moderate demonstration against our linets that Johnston had ridden from Marietta with Hardee and Polk till he reached Pine Mountain (Pine Tpied or weakly held. This was the position of Hardee on the morning of June 17th. It was formed by a dropping back of Hardee's men after being relieved from their place held the previous day. They hwas feeling forward for the new right flank of Hardee. Soon the valley of Mud Creek was reached, gradually toward the southeast, so as to face Hardee's refused lines, was coming upon the Confederaeek, above described, with the forcing back of Hardee's flank, the situation was dangerous for Johns[10 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 32: battle of Kolb's Farm and Kenesaw (search)
at Confederate Loring held all the long breastworks of the Confederate right opposite McPherson; Hardee held the center and much of the left opposite Thomas's three corps, which were in line from left to right, viz., Palmer's, Howard's, and Hooker's. Hood had simply passed partially beyond Hardee's left and come up to make his reconnoissance and attack, so that Hooker's men encountered only a part of Hood's and a part of Hardee's commands. Schofield breasted the remainder of Hood's divisions and the cavalry of Wheeler, which supported Hood's moving left flank. In view of these plain factsthe southern sloping crest and the ground passing beyond the Marietta and Canton wagon road. Hardee's corps began there, crossed the next highway (the Marietta and Lost Mountain road), and gradualeler. Thomas, with his three Union corps, touched the middle bend opposite Loring and part of Hardee. Hooker's corps made Thomas's right; then came, on the extreme right, the Twenty-third Corps an
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 33: battle of Smyrna camp ground; crossing the Chattahoochee; General Johnston relieved from command (search)
neman now held our side of the river to Sandtown. The position of the Confederate army was in two lines running across the Atlanta Railroad at right angles near where the railroad bent off toward the river. Loring's corps was on the right and Hardee's on the left of that road. Hood's stretched off toward the extreme left, where was G. W. Smith with his Georgia troops supporting General Jackson's cavalry. Wheeler's cavalry division watched the extreme right. Hood was made uneasy by McPhe, full of hope and courage, located his splendidly disciplined and veteran troops as follows: Stewart, succeeding Polk, on the left touching the Chattahoochee; Hood on the right from Clear Creek around to some point near the Augusta Railroad; and Hardee holding the center. Hood's right was strengthened by General G. W. Smith with his Georgia troops. Wheeler with his cavalry watched the front and right, and Jackson the left. Just as Johnston had put everything in capital shape to repulse us
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1, Chapter 34: battle of Peach Tree Creek (search)
he activity of our troops in the vicinity of Leggett's Hill caused Hood first to delay the beginning of the battle, and afterwards, at the most critical period of Hardee's attack, to take from his reserve Cleburne's division and send it off to his extreme right, so as to oppose McPherson's vigorous operations. Of course, if Hoog of the 20th or the morning of the 21st much nearer to Atlanta, without receiving effective opposition. The assault upon Thomas was to be made from the right of Hardee to the left of Stewart in a sort of echelon movement; that is, for Bate's division to move first, Walker's a little later, Maney's later still some 200 yards or mof battle, and succeeded in repelling their assailants without loss of ground. The last strong effort made by the Confederates in this engagement took place on Hardee's right. It was evidently Bate's division, supported by Walker, which was making the final effort to turn the flank of the Army of the Cumberland. It was an eff