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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 426 0 Browse Search
John Bell Hood., Advance and Retreat: Personal Experiences in the United States and Confederate Armies 312 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 272 0 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 241 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 132 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 122 4 Browse Search
Edward Alfred Pollard, The lost cause; a new Southern history of the War of the Confederates ... Drawn from official sources and approved by the most distinguished Confederate leaders. 97 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.1, Alabama (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 85 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 84 0 Browse Search
Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862., Part II: Correspondence, Orders, and Returns. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott) 84 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for W. J. Hardee or search for W. J. Hardee in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 2.12 (search)
fields — still delightfully musical, calm and clear as of old — only perhaps a little more powerful. After his graduation, I never saw him again until the commencement of the late war. He was assigned to the First United States Cavalry, whose Colonel was Sumner and whose Lieutenant-Colonel was Joseph E. Johnston. Two years later, when I graduated, I was put in the Second Cavalry, serving in Texas. My Colonel was Albert Sidney Johnson; the Lieutenant-Colonel was R. E. Lee; the Majors were Hardee and George H. Thomas, and the two senior Captains Van Dorn and Kirby Smith. Stuart served with much distinction as a United States officer; had plenty of roving, riding, and fighting Indians. When John Brown's troops were marching on and took possession of the engine-house at Harper's Ferry, Stuart was in or near Washington on leave of absence, but he immediately volunteered for the occasion, and accompanied the then Colonel R. E. Lee as his aid to that place. He it was who, at great
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 6.35 (search)
patrons that he would never fight against her-- He would not have been put into so much personal peril and alarm, as he tells us he was, by the Federal soldiers in St. Louis, after they had captured the Confederates in Camp Jackson. Nor have had to gallop away from his shattered brigade to save himself, as he tells us he did, at the First Manassas. Nor have been surprised and routed at Shiloh. Nor defeated at Chickasaw Bluff by one-tenth of his force. Nor have been repulsed by Hardee at Missionary Ridge. Nor have been driven out of the Deer Creek country. Nor have fled from Enterprise to Vicksburg on the defeat of his expedition against Mobile and Selma. Nor have made his march to the sea. Nor have said in his official reports and in his testimony before the claims commission that General Wade Hampton burned Columbia, when he knew he did not. Nor have written and published his story of all these things. The Southern army lost nothing when Sherman decide
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Official correspondence of Governor Letcher, of Virginia. (search)
e addition to our collection of autographs. Upon a request of Governor Letcher that Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, United States Army, be allowed to come to Richmond to drill the Virginia cavalry then encamped at the Fair Grounds, General Scott wrote the following letters. General Hardee complied with the request, and drilled the cavalry several days. New York, October 22, 1860. His Excellencyr of Virginia: My Dear Sir — I have caused a copy of your letter to be forwarded to Lieutenant-Colonel Hardee, who is, I think, still at West Point, though relieved from duty there. It is not comrvice whatever, not strictly within the line of his official duties, but I think it probable Colonel Hardee will take pleasure in meeting the wishes of your Excellency. With great respect, I hav servant, Winfield Scott. Headquarters of the army, New York, October 22, 186<*>. Lieutenant-Colonel W. J. Hardee, First United States Cavalry: Sir — By direction of the Lieutenant-General comma