Browsing named entities in The Daily Dispatch: June 25, 1864., [Electronic resource]. You can also browse the collection for Mary Harris or search for Mary Harris in all documents.

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The defences of Richmond — great Difficulties in the way of Taring it The New York Tribune contains some stunning revelations from Richmond, furnished by a Mr Harris, an Englishman, who had served in the Crimes, and had some knowledge of engineering. He escaped from the city, and is now in New York. His account of the fortJeff Davis & Co became fully satisfied that Richmond was to be resolutely assailed, the citizen militia were called out for further instruction and practice, and Mr Harris, although an alien, was forced to enter the ranks. Instead of appearing reluctant to do his part, he evinced a readiness and even a desire to aid in the defence by storm. He names and describes some twenty or thirty forts, some of the walls of which are from 80 to 90 feet thick, and all of them quite impregnable. Mr Harris gets into the cotton question, and shows how we make our explosives: The great scarcity of saltpetre, and the difficulty of obtaining it from abroad, has exc
Mayor's Court, yesterday. --William, slave of Samuel Fauntleroy, and William, slave of A. F. Gooch, were charged with robbing Mrs. Mary Harris of two black bombazine dresses, valued at $200. Mrs. Harris testified that after retiring on Wednesday night she was waked up by a noise in the first story of her residence, her chamber being in the upper or second story. She very cautiously got out of her bed and went to the head of the stairs, and looking over the railing espied a man stooping doMrs. Harris testified that after retiring on Wednesday night she was waked up by a noise in the first story of her residence, her chamber being in the upper or second story. She very cautiously got out of her bed and went to the head of the stairs, and looking over the railing espied a man stooping down taking things from her wardrobe, which was sitting in the passage. As she did so the fellow raised up, and holding to his face a lighted torch, she was enabled to see that he was a negro. This so much alarmed her that she screamed out, when he immediately ran out, taking with him the dresses alluded to above. After he had gone search was made about the house, when there was found at the back door, which had been broken open, three pairs of shoes and a hat, and in the yard by the fence an