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William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 48 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 34 6 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 15 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 15 3 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 9 1 Browse Search
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 3 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 2 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant. You can also browse the collection for John F. Hartranft or search for John F. Hartranft in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 2 document sections:

Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Grand movement of the Army of the Potomac- crossing the Rapidan-entering the Wilderness- battle of the Wilderness (search)
Third Division, Brig.-Gen. J. H. Wilson.First Brigade, Col. T. M. Bryan, Jr. Second Brigade, Col. Geo. H. Chapman. Maj.-Gen. A. E. Burnside, commanding Ninth Army Corps. First Division, Brig.-Gen. T. G. Stevenson.First Brigade, Col. Sumner Carruth. Second Brigade, Col. Daniel Leasure. Second Division, Brig.-Gen. Robert B. Potter.First Brigade, Col. Zenas R. Bliss. Second Brigade, Col. Simon G. Griffin. Third Division, Brig.-Gen. Orlando B. Wilcox.First Brigade, Col. John F. Hartranft. Second Brigade, Col. Benj. C. Christ. Fourth Division, Brig.-Gen. Edward Ferrero.First Brigade, Col. Joshua K. Sigfried. Second Brigade, Col. Henry G. Thomas. Provisional Brigade, Col. Elisha G. Marshall. Brig.-Gen. Henry J. Hunt, commanding Artillery. Reserve, Col. H. S. Burton. First Brigade, Col. J. H. Kitching. Second Brigade, Maj. J. A. Tompkins. First Brig. Horse Art., Capt. J. M. Robertson. Second Brigade Horse Art., Capt. D. R. Ransom. Third Brigade,
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Arrival of the peace commissioners-lincoln and the peace commissioners-an anecdote of Lincoln-the winter before Petersburg-Sheridan Destroys the Railroad — Gordon Carries the picket line-parke Recaptures the line-the battle of White Oak road (search)
made all preparations to drive the enemy back. General [J. C.] Tidball gathered a large number of pieces of artillery and planted them in rear of the captured works so as to sweep the narrow space of ground between the lines very thoroughly. Hartranft was soon out with his division, as also was Willcox. Hartranft to the right of the breach headed the rebels off in that direction and rapidly drove them back into Fort Stedman. On the other side they were driven back into the intrenchments whHartranft to the right of the breach headed the rebels off in that direction and rapidly drove them back into Fort Stedman. On the other side they were driven back into the intrenchments which they had captured, and batteries eleven and twelve were retaken by Willcox early in the morning. Parke then threw a line around outside of the captured fort and batteries, and communication was once more established. The artillery fire was kept up so continuously that it was impossible for the Confederates to retreat, and equally impossible for reinforcements to join them. They all, therefore, fell captives into our hands. This effort of Lee's cost him about four thousand men, and re