hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 12 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Carlyle's laugh and other surprises 6 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge 4 0 Browse Search
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2 2 0 Browse Search
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 4 2 0 Browse Search
Historic leaves, volume 8, April, 1909 - January, 1910 2 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 45 results in 20 document sections:

1 2
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Chapter 2: old Cambridge in three literary epochs (search)
l and vale on their bicycles. This was the period when she went to school with Dr. Holmes and overwhelmed him by beginning her first essay with the sentence, It is a trite remark, whereas he confesses that at that time he did not even know the meaning of the word trite. All this early Cambridge training, if it did not make her a systematic thinker, made her an inexhaustible reader and a patient editor. Her friend, Dr. Frederic Henry Hedge, who had been five years in Germany, had taken his Harvard degree, and had studied theology in the Cambridge Divinity School, was undoubtedly the best-trained and most methodical of the early Transcendentalists, and contributed to the management of the Dial whatever of steadfastness it had. He, like his friend Margaret, had drunk deeply at the newly opened well of German literature, and he was one of the best translators of that language, so that they were both ready and willing to enrich American letters from this source. He also introduced her
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Olde Cambridge, Index (search)
, Eastman, 170. Keats, John, 174. Kimball, J. W., 99. Kirk, J. F., 190. Kirkland, Pres. J. T., 116. Kneeland, Dr., 23. Kossuth, Louis, 46. Lachapelle, Madame, 96. Langdon, Pres., Samuel, 21. Lathrop, G. P., 70. Lechmere, Mrs., 151. Lechmere, Richard, 150. Lee, Judge, Joseph, 150, 152. Lee, Mrs., 151. Letcher, Gov., 178. Lindley, John, 100. Livermore, George, 18. Longfellow, H. W., II, 24, 32, 33, 36, 37,44, 65, 68, 69, 70, 86, 107; early life, III; comparison of Bowdoin and Harvard, 111-112; plans of life, 114-115; Bowdoin professorship, 116; first visit to Europe, I 6; European work, 117-118; early sketches, 118-119; marriage, 119-122; removal to Cambridge, 123; friendships, 124; Craigie House, 124-127; appearance, 128-129; second marriage, 130; Hiawatha, 131; Evangeline, 131; Psalm of life, 131-133; Hyperion, 134; diaries, 134-135; troublesome correspondents, 136; influence upon music, 137; kind words to Poe, 137; critics, 138; translations, 140; college work irksom
William Schouler, A history of Massachusetts in the Civil War: Volume 2, Chapter 15: Worcester County. (search)
a. The town-treasurer during all the years of the war was C. C. Moore. 1861. On the 19th of April, when information was received that our Sixth Regiment had been attacked in Baltimore, the selectmen issued the following call for a public meeting: Citizens of Bolton! All who are in favor of sustaining the Government of the United States are earnestly requested to meet at the Town Hall on Monday, April 22d, at 7 o'clock P. M., to hear and act upon the proposition received from Berlin and Harvard to form a volunteer military company, and to adopt such other measures as may be deemed necessary. In accordance with this call a large meeting was held, of which Marcellus Houghton was chosen chairman and Richard S. Edes secretary. A committee, consisting of Silas Holman, Nathaniel A. Newton, and Joseph H. Sawyer, was appointed to report resolutions, which were subsequently read and unanimously adopted: First, That we, the citizens of Bolton, desire to be behind none of our fellow-citize
Francis Jackson Garrison, William Lloyd Garrison, 1805-1879; the story of his life told by his children: volume 2, Chapter 2: Germs of contention among brethren.—1836. (search)
rights. Our abolition friends were all delighted to see and hear him. In the interview we had with the Legislative committee, he spoke exceedingly well, Right and Wrong in Boston, 1836, (2) p. 8; May's Recollections, p. 191; Lib. 6.43, 50. better than anybody else, and was for that very reason more insolently treated by the chairman of the committee than any of our number, not excepting even Prof. Follen. Dr. Follen's outspoken connection with the abolitionists had already cost him his Harvard professorship, which was allowed to lapse without renewal (May's Recollections, p. 254; Hudson's History of Lexington, p. 360). He drew up a very able defence of the principles and measures of the abolitionists, which was adopted by our abolition committee, and is now probably in the hands of the members of the Legislature, in a pamphlet form. A Full Statement of the Reasons which were in part offered to the Committee of the Legislature of Massachusetts, etc. (Boston: Isaac Knapp, 1836)
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The scholar in a republic (1881). (search)
training of our powers, as the gymnast or the fencer does of his muscles; we go hence also with such general knowledge of what mankind has agreed to consider proved and settled, that we know where to reach for the weapon when we need it. I have often thought the motto prefixed to his college library catalogue by the father of the late Professor Peirce,--Professor Peirce, the largest natural genius, the man of the deepest reach and firmest grasp and widest sympathy, that God has given to Harvard in our day, whose presence made you the loftiest peak and farthest outpost of more than mere scientific thought, the magnet who, with his twin Agassiz, made Harvard for forty years the intellectual Mecca of forty States,--his father's catalogue bore for a motto, Scire ubi aliquid invenias magna pars eruditionis est; and that always seemed to me to gauge very nearly all we acquired at college, except facility in the use of our powers. Our influence in the community does not really spring f
Mary Thacher Higginson, Thomas Wentworth Higginson: the story of his life, Bibliography (search)
Outlook, Youth's Companion, et al.) 1897 Book and Heart. Procession of the Flowers, and kindred papers. Def. VI. The Biography of Browning's Fame. (In Browning Society of Boston. Papers.) Educational Conditions and Problems. [Speech at the Annual Meeting of the Harvard Teachers' Association, March 6.] (In Educational Review, May.) Cheerful Yesterdays. (In Atlantic Monthly, Jan.-May.) Def. I. Colored Troops under Fire. (In Century Magazine, June.) Gottingen and Harvard Eighty Years Ago. (In Harvard Graduates' Magazine, Sept.) Literary London Twenty Years Ago. (In Atlantic Monthly, Dec.) Articles. (In Nation, et al.) 1898 Cheerful Yesterdays. Def. I. Cambridge Public Library Report. Pph. Tales of the Enchanted Islands of the Atlantic. (With Edward Channing.) English History for Americans. New edition of their English History for American Readers. 1893. Harriet Beecher Stowe. [Preface.] (In Stowe. Uncle Tom's Cabin. New ed.) [Sk
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Henry Walcott Boynton, Reader's History of American Literature, Chapter 6: the Cambridge group (search)
inion of Dr. Oliver Wendell Holmes: Of the longer poems of our chief singer, I should not hesitate to select Evangeline as the masterpiece, and I think the general verdict of opinion would confirm my choice. . . . From the first line of the poem, from its first words, we read as we would float down a broad and placid river, murmuring softly against its banks, heaven over it, and the glory of the unspoiled wilderness all around. After a tenure — of eighteen years, Longfellow resigned his Harvard professorship. During the next few years Hiawatha and The Courtship of miles Standish were produced, and were received with great enthusiasm in America and elsewhere. The principal works of his later years were the Dante translations and Christus: a Mystery. The Christus was the fine flowering of Longfellow's spiritual life. Yet one rarely sees the book quoted; it has not been widely read, and in all the vast list of Longfellow translations into foreign languages, there appears no versi
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 10: Thoreau (search)
nry Thoreau in Walden wood is the same as the mariner of York on the Island of Desolation; he represents once more the struggle of primitive man to obtain food and shelter, in fact the epic of civilization. The interest of the theme is perennial. Walden is also the memorial of an American faun, of a wild man who lived in the woods, who carried an umbrella like Robinson Crusoe, to weatherfend his head, and used a microscope to study insects with. About the same time, just after leaving Harvard, Thoreau found his first arrowhead and began his first journal, and the two streams of tendency ran side by side in his nature till the end. Intercourse with nature was even more necessary to Thoreau than intercourse with books. Intercourse with human beings he thought he did not need, but he was always tramping off to the village for a chat. He was not a real solitary, for visitors were always coming to view the progress of the odd experiment in living. Still Thoreau differed widely fro
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 17: writers on American history, 1783-1850 (search)
who has lived in the United States. This he did partly because of his literary worth, partly because of his political activity, and partly because of his social prominence. President Arthur once said that the President is permitted to accept the invitations of members of the cabinet, supreme court judges, and—Mr. George Bancroft. Bancroft was born in Massachusetts in 1800 and died in Washington in 1891. Having graduated from Harvard in 1817, he went to Gottingen on funds subscribed by Harvard and its friends. Back in America in 1822 with a doctor's degree, he settled for a year at Harvard as tutor in Greek. He brought home from Europe many affectations of manner and such marked eccentricities that his influence at Harvard was undermined; at the end of a year he left, to become, with Joseph G. Cogswell, proprietor of a boys' school at Northampton, Massachusetts. As a schoolmaster Bancroft was a failure, and he retired from the school in 1831. Meanwhile, he had begun to write
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 18: Prescott and Motley (search)
pathetic and congenial parents and well-to-do family circumstances, and he was as well equipped for intellectual life as Harvard could make him. But ill-health barred the way to active life. All the capacity for work, for the steady occupation thae chronicles of Andres Bernaldez as a first-hand source. Luckily the secretary devoted to his service was an able young Harvard graduate, a Mr. English, capable of supplementing the author's eyes, and sympathetic with his methods. The copy of Bernproduced by the casting of the die and the ending of the compromise restraint. Born the very year Prescott finished his Harvard course, Motley was two-thirds of a generation behind the elder historian. Thus, though the immediate environment of thef of his conscience so that his abilities found enduring record when, at last, he developed the powers of industry. His Harvard career was begun at the age of thirteen and completed at seventeen—an age young even for the time—and it is not surprisi
1 2