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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The treatment of prisoners during the war between the States. (search)
itters from the steamer at Rocketts. Thirteen dead bodies were brought off the steamer the same night. At least thirty died in one night after they were received. Surgeon Spence testifies: I was at Savannah, and saw rather over three thousand prisoners received. The list showed that a large number had died on the passage from Baltimore to Savannah. The number sent from the Federal prisons was 3,500, and out of that number they delivered only 3,028, to the best of my recollection. Captain Hatch can give you the exact number. Thus, about 472 died on the passage. I was told that 67 dead bodies had been taken from one train of cars between Elmira and Baltimore. After being received at Savannah, they had the best attention possible, yet many died in a few days. --In carrying out the exchange of disabled, sick and wounded men, we delivered at Savannah and Charleston about 11,000 Federal prisoners, and their physical condition compared most favorably with those we received in exch
e cowardly rout, was driving them back with unmerciful lashes to their deserted charges. Men were now seen flocking back, and the baggage-train was again supplied with teamsters . .. The other end of our column encountered the force which was to have been sent to attack our rear. First the Zouaves d'afrique, body-guard of General Banks, had been stationed in the rear, to burn the bridge across Meadow Creek, three miles from Strasburgh, after all had passed except the cavalry, under General Hatch, who was yet to come up and ford the river. While they were besmearing the bridge with tar, unexpecting any danger, the enemy charged down upon them from the mountain on the left, cutting them up in the most unmerciful manner, and capturing all of them except five . . .. Presently there was a commotion, a sobbing among the women, and a running to and fro, which brought me to my feet in time to find our forces were started on a retreat; and, as I saw flames rising from the burning bu
ich I had very narrowly escaped. I could obtain little sleep during the remainder of the night; and was ready to move before sunrise when the command was given to mount. Our march lay in the direction of Massaponax Church, about eight miles distant from Fredericksburg, on the Telegraph Road — a wide plank turnpike leading directly to Richmond. We had been informed by our spies and patrols that a Federal force of 8000 men, with the usual complement of artillery, under the command of Generals Hatch and Gibbon, was on an expedition to destroy the most important line of railway communication with our army, and burn the depots of supplies at Hanover Junction. Riding as usual with the advance-guard, I was the first to discover the hostile column when we had reached a point within half a mile of the Telegraph Road. I immediately gave the order to halt, and rode back to give information of the enemy's presence to General Stuart, who made his dispositions with his accustomed celerity.
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Capture of Port Gibson-Grierson's raid-occupation of Grand Gulf-movement up the Big Black- battle of Raymond (search)
rn paper of the complete success of Colonel [Benjamin H.] Grierson, who was making a raid through central Mississippi. He had started from La Grange April 17th with three regiments of about 1,700 men. On the 21st he had detached Colonel [Edward] Hatch with one regiment to destroy the railroad between Columbus and Macon and then return to La Grange. Hatch had a sharp fight with the enemy at Columbus and retreated along the railroad, destroying it at Okalona and Tupelo, and arriving in La GrangHatch had a sharp fight with the enemy at Columbus and retreated along the railroad, destroying it at Okalona and Tupelo, and arriving in La Grange April 26. Grierson continued his movement with about 1,000 men, breaking the Vicksburg and Meridian railroad and the New Orleans and Jackson railroad, arriving at Baton Rouge May 2d. This raid was of great importance, for Grierson had attracted the attention of the enemy from the main movement against Vicksburg. During the night of the 2d of May the bridge over the North Fork was repaired, and the troops commenced crossing at five the next morning. Before the leading brigade was over
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, The campaign in Georgia-Sherman's March to the sea-war anecdotes-the March on Savannah- investment of Savannah-capture of Savannah (search)
all communication with the west side of the river, and by the river itself to the north and south. On the South Carolina side the country was all rice fields, through which it would have been impossible to bring supplies-so that Hardee had no possible communication with the outside world except by a dilapidated plank road starting from the west bank of the river. Sherman, receiving this reply, proceeded in person to a point on the coast, where General Foster had troops stationed under General Hatch, for the purpose of making arrangements with the latter officer to go through by one of the numerous channels running inland along that part of the coast of South Carolina, to the plank road which General Hardee still possessed, and thus to cut him off from the last means he had of getting supplies, if not of communication. While arranging for this movement, and before the attempt to execute the plan had been commenced, Sherman received information through one of his staff officers t
J. B. Jones, A Rebel War Clerk's Diary, chapter 38 (search)
Xxxvii. April, 1864 Return of Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch from Fortress Monroe. quarrel between Mr. Memminger and Mr. Seddon. famine. a victory in Louisiana. Vice-President Stephens's speech. victory of Gen. Forrest. capture of Plymouth, N. C. Gen. Lee's bill of fare. April 1 Cloudy all day, with occasional light showers. No war news; but the papers have an account of the shooting of an infant by some Yankees on account of its name. This shows that the war is degenerat upon them. The only hope would be civil war in the North, a not improbable event. What could they do with four millions of negroes arrogating equality with the whites? April 4 A cold rain all day; wind from northwest. Mr. Ould and Capt. Hatch, agents of exchange (of prisoners), have returned from a conference with Gen. Butler, at Fortress Monroe, and it is announced that arrangements have been made for an immediate resumption of the exchange of prisoners on the old footing. Thus h
night. The next morning, April nineteenth, I sent a detachment eastward to communicate with Colonel Hatch, and make a demonstration toward Chesterville, where a regiment of cavalry was organizing. ect of our advance was to break up these parties. The expedition eastward communicated with Colonel Hatch, who was still moving south parallel to us. The one to New-Albany came upon two hundred rebeing west. After the return of these expeditions, I moved with the whole force to Pontotoc. Colonel Hatch joined us about noon, reporting having skirmished with about two hundred rebels the afternoo about eight o'clock came to the road leading south-east to Columbus, Miss. Here I detached Colonel Hatch, with the Second Iowa cavalry and one gun of the battery, with orders to proceed to the Ohio us much in the accomplishment of the main object of the expedition. After having started Colonel Hatch on his way, with the remaining portion of the command, consisting of the Sixth and Seventh I
enant Smith's report. Lagrange, Tenn., August 9. Colonel Hurst: I beg leave to make the following report of a scout of which I had command, by order of Colonel Hatch: On the second instant Colonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I stColonel Hatch ordered me, with sixteen men, to take a despatch to General Dodge at Corinth. Leaving Colonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We theColonel Hatch at Lexington, I started to Corinth, and on the morning of the third I met the First Alabama (Federal) cavalry on the waters of White Oak Creek, when the Major commanding requested me to let him send the message to General Dodge, and that I would go with him as a guide; to which I assented, being well acquainted with that portion, of country. We then proceeded in the direction of Swallow Bluff, on the Tennessee River, meeting with no opposition. Near Swallow Bluff we separated, the Alabama cavalry moving up the river. After we parted I had a fight with some of Colonel Biffle's men across the river, but do not know the amount of damage done. We saw some of the rebels fall f
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 7: Secession Conventions in six States. (search)
the gathering insurgents. General Dix was then at the head of the Treasury Department. As soon as he was fully informed of the matter, he wrote to the Collector (Hatch) that he could not believe that a proceeding so discordant with the character of the people of the United States, and so revolting to the civilization of the age, , and, in reply, refuse to obey the order. Jones immediately communicated the fact of this refusal to the Secretary, by telegraph, and informed him that Collector Hatch sustained the action of the rebel. Dix instantly telegraphed back, saying:--Tell Lieutenant Caldwell to arrest Captain Breshwood, assume command of the cutter, anwn the American flag, shoot him on the spot. The conspirators, who held control of the telegraph in New Orleans, did not allow this dispatch to pass. Collector Hatch was in complicity with them, and the McClelland fell into the hands of the insurgents. Two days afterward, the National Mint and the Custom House, with all the pr
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 1., Chapter 14: the great Uprising of the people. (search)
visit and sketch the remains of the famous old battle. ground. At a little past two o'clock in the afternoon, while sitting on the base of the unfinished monument commemorative of the conflict, making a drawing of the plain of Chalmette, where it occurred, we heard seven discharges of heavy guns at the city — the number of the States in the Confederacy. Fort Sumter is doubtless gone, I said to my companion. It was so. The news had reached the city at that hour, and under the direction of Hatch, the disloyal Collector of the port of New Orleans, See page 185. the guns of the McClelland, which the insurgents had seized, were fired in honor of the event. On our return to the city, at five o'clock in the evening, we found it alive with excitement. The Washington Artillery were just marching by the statue of Henry Clay, on Canal Street, and members of many other corps, some of them in the brilliant and picturesque Zouave uniform, were hurrying, singly or in squads, to their resp
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