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Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 121 1 Browse Search
George H. Gordon, From Brook Farm to Cedar Mountain 88 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 43 5 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 21 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman . 9 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
William Boynton, Sherman's Historical Raid 4 0 Browse Search
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4.. You can also browse the collection for John P. Hatch or search for John P. Hatch in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., chapter 15.100 (search)
ops of Georgia beyond their legal jurisdiction. I therefore asked and obtained permission to bring these exhausted troops back to their own State. The Federal forces engaged at Honey Hill consisted of about 5500 men and 10 guns, under General John P. Hatch, sent by General John G. Foster, commanding the Department of the South, to secure a foothold for Sherman's army and to cut off Confederate relinforcements from Savannah. The Federal loss was 88 killed, 623 wounded, 43 missing,--total, 7ld not materially, if at all, affect the regular daily progress of Sherman's main forces. If General Sherman purposed crossing the Savannah River, and thus reaching the sea-coast of South Carolina, he abandoned such intention after the defeat of Hatch's forces at Honey Hill. Sherman's army continued to move down the Savannah River on the Georgia side. About fifteen thousand Confederate troops from. the Carolinas had reached Savannah, and General Hardee sent large detachments out on the Ge
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., The failure to capture Hardee. (search)
o bloody, I concluded to make one more effort to completely surround Savannah on all sides, so as further to excite H ardee's fears, and in case of success to capture his whole army. We had already completely invested the place on the north, west, and south, but there remained to the enemy on the east the use of the old dyke or plank-road leading into South Carolina, and I knew that Hardee would have a pontoon-bridge across the river. On examining my maps I thought that the division of John P. Hatch, belonging to General Foster's command, might be moved from its then position at Broad River, by water, down to Bluffton, from which it could reach the plank-road, fortify and hold it, at some risk, of course, because i[ardee could avail himself of his central position to fall on this detachment with his whole army. To carry out the purpose Sherman went to Hilton Head, and on the way back was met with the announcement that Hardee had evacuated Savannah.--editors. As to intervening ob