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Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown School in the 17th century. (search)
Charlestown School in the 17th century. By Frank Mortimer Hawes. in presenting this account of the first school of Charlestown, we trust that the time given to musty old records has not been spent unprofitably. If the story awaken in the reader's mind an interest commensurate with that which held us to the task, our labors will be amply rewarded. Although settled a year or more previous, Charlestown was incorporated—to use the date in our Court Manual—August 23, 1630. The bounds of the town had no definite limits, but we learn that, March 3, 1636, they extended eight miles into the country, from the meeting house. In September, 1642, a part of Charlestown was set off and incorporated as the town of Woburn, and May 2, 1649, the indefinitely designated Mistick Side became the town of Malden. The territory that remained extended as far as the bounds of Reading, and included (not to mention more remote districts) besides the peninsula, a large part of Medford, portions of Cambr
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Officers of Somerville historical Society. (search)
rian and Curator,Alfred M. Cutler. Council-at-large. Charles D. Elliot,L. Roger Wentworth,Anna P. Vinal. Historic Sites. J. O. Hayden, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot. Luther B. Pillsbury. Essays and addresses. John F. Ayer, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot, William E. Brigham,Seth Mason, Mrs. V. E. Ayer. Library and cabinet. Alfred M. Cutler, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, Mrs. Helen M. Heald,Miss Marriette E. Eddy. Photographs. Benjamin F. Freeman, Chairman,Charles W. Colman, Albert L. Haskell. Press and Clipping Miss Anna P. Vinal, Chairman,Miss M. Agnes Hunt, Miss Lucy M. Stone,Miss Mary A. Haley, Miss Marion Knapp. Publications. Sam Walter Foss, Chairman,Frank M. Hawes, Sara A. Stone,John F. Ayer, ex-officio. Military records. Col. Edwin C. Bennett, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, John H. Dusseault,Alfred M. Cutler. House. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Hammond, Chairman,Mrs. V. E. Ayer, Mrs. F. De Witt Lapham.
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown School in the 17th century. (search)
Charlestown School in the 17th century. By Frank Mortimer Hawes. (Continued.) Mr. Benjamin Thompson, who had been in charge of the Boston Latin School, for some reason was offered a secondary position in the same, and declined. He gracefully exchanged places with Mr. Cheever. January 30, 1671, the Charlestown records say: ‘Mr. Benjamin Thompson began to teach the schoole in this Towne.’ The agreement between him and the selectmen reads as follows:— 1. That he shall be paid £ 30 per annum by the Towne and to receive 20 shillings a year from each particular scholar that he shall teach, to be paid him by those who send children to him to school. 2. That he shall prepare such youths as are capable of it for the college, with learning answerable. 3. That he shall teach to read, write & cypher. 4. That there shall be half a year's warning given mutually by him and the Town before any change or remove on either side. The school was in Mr. Thompson's hands until November 7,
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Officers of Somerville historical Society. (search)
rian and Curator,Alfred M. Cutler. Council-at-large. Charles D. Elliot,L. Roger Wentworth,Anna P. Vinal. Historic Sites. J. O. Hayden, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot. Luther B. Pillsbury. Essays and addresses. John F. Ayer, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot, William E. Brigham,Seth Mason, Mrs. V. E. Ayer. Library and cabinet. Alfred M. Cutler, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, Mrs. Helen M. Heald,Miss Marriette E. Eddy. Photographs. Benjamin F. Freeman, Chairman,Charles W. Colman, Albert L. Haskell. Press and Clipping Miss Anna P. Vinal, Chairman,Miss M. Agnes Hunt, Miss Lucy M. Stone,Miss Mary A. Haley, Miss Marion Knapp. Publications. Sam Walter Foss, Chairman,Frank M. Hawes, Sara A. Stone,John F. Ayer, ex-officio. Military records. Col. Edwin C. Bennett, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, John H. Dusseault,Alfred M. Cutler. House. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Hammond, Chairman,Mrs. V. E. Ayer, Mrs. F. De Witt Lapham.
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Charlestown Schools in the 18th century. (search)
Charlestown Schools in the 18th century. By Frank Mortimer Hawes. [Continued.] at the beginning of the eightenth century the Charlestown School, as we have shown, was under the charge of Thomas Swan, M. A. This gentleman was a graduate of Harvard College in the class of 1689. He was born in Roxbury, September 15, 1669, and was the son of Dr. Thomas and Mary (Lamb) Swan, of that town. In 1690 he was teaching in Hadley. After resigning at Charlestown he became Register of Probate for Middlesex County. December 27, 1692, he married Prudence, daughter of Jonathan Wade, Jr., of Medford, and they had four children, the births of three of whom were recorded in Charlestown. Mr. Swan died at the Castle in Boston Harbor, October 19, 1710, aged 41 years. ‘He did practise physick & chyrurgerye at Castle William upward of 7 years, at 12 pence per week for every 20 soldiers garrisoned there.’ His widow applied to the court for the payment of a sum of money which was her husband's due, a
Historic leaves, volume 2, April, 1903 - January, 1904, Officers of Somerville historical Society. (search)
rian and Curator,Alfred M. Cutler. Council-at-large. Charles D. Elliot,L. Roger Wentworth,Anna P. Vinal. Historic Sites. J. O. Hayden, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot. Luther B. Pillsbury. Essays and addresses. John F. Ayer, Chairman,Charles D. Elliot, William E. Brigham,Seth Mason, Mrs. V. E. Ayer. Library and cabinet. Alfred M. Cutler, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, Mrs. Helen M. Heald,Miss Marriette E. Eddy. Photographs. Benjamin F. Freeman, Chairman,Charles W. Colman, Albert L. Haskell. Press and Clipping Miss Anna P. Vinal, Chairman,Miss M. Agnes Hunt, Miss Lucy M. Stone,Miss Mary A. Haley, Miss Marion Knapp. Publications. Sam Walter Foss, Chairman,Frank M. Hawes, Sara A. Stone,John F. Ayer, ex-officio. Military records. Col. Edwin C. Bennett, Chairman,Levi L. Hawes, John H. Dusseault,Alfred M. Cutler. House. Mrs. Elizabeth F. Hammond, Chairman,Mrs. V. E. Ayer, Mrs. F. De Witt Lapham.
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Charlestown schools in the Eighteenth century. (search)
Charlestown schools in the Eighteenth century. By Frank Mortimer Hawes. [Continued.] Mr. Barrett probably did not teach longer than the time specified, as Wyman says that the next incumbent of the office, Joseph Simson, taught from 1721 to 1724. May 15, 1721. In addition to the master's salary of £ 60 for the coming year, £ 3 was voted for firewood for the school. As this is the first time the subject of wood is mentioned in this form, we may infer that previous to this date, as in other towns at that time, the fuel for the school had been contributed by the parents. February 8, 1722-3. In running the bounds of the school lot, being No. 68, given to the school by Mr. Daniel Russell, being in second division of Charlestown, viz.: a wood lot of 45 1/2 acres, it was found that this lot and lot 67 fell short 101 acres, & we offered to settle the bounds with Mr. Joseph Underwood, we to abate 7 acres and he 3 1/2 acres, which he refused. But we settled bounds & drove down stakes
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Charlestown schools within the peninsula Revolutionary period (search)
Charlestown schools within the peninsula Revolutionary period Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) We have seen that Mr. Sweetser's resignation as master of the grammar school went into effect March 6, 1750 (O. S.). The day before, a committee, consisting of James Russell, Ebenezer Kent, Edward Sheafe, Jr., Samuel Bradstreet, and Samuel Henley, met to see about a new master and perhaps a second man to teach writing. Mr. John Rand was engaged to finish out the term until May, at twenty shillings per week. This committee reported that it is for the interest of the town to have two masters, one for teaching Latin, the other for writing and arithmetic, as it is impossible for any one man to teach the children of the town in both capacities. In May the town voted a marvelous sum, as compared with the amounts of previous years,—£ 900, old tenor,—for two schools within the Neck; and as if to satisfy our curiosity, the record explains that this is equivalent to £ 120 lawful money.<
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Charlestown schools within the peninsula Revolutionary period (search)
Charlestown schools within the peninsula Revolutionary period By Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) In giving our brief sketch of Mr. Sweetser, we are not able to state precisely when his term of service ended as schoolmaster. January 20, 1755, he was chosen town clerk till the March meeting. In May, 1761, and perhaps earlier, he was serving in that capacity permanently. He held this office until his death, which occurred suddenly January 15, 1778. His school labors, like those of Mr. Harris, may have ended with the disastrous events of 1775. An obituary notice of him may be found in the Boston Gazette, under date of his death. Seth Sweetser, Jr., born February 5, 1704, was of the fourth generation from the original settler of the same name, who came to this country from Tring, Hertfordshire, Eng. He graduated from Harvard College in the class of 1722, and, with the exception of the year 1750–'51, was schoolmaster in his native town from July, 1724, for fully fifty years
Historic leaves, volume 3, April, 1904 - January, 1905, Gregory Stone and some of his descendants (search)
e were twenty-five slaves in town, in most cases kept as house servants. It is said that Deacon Stone had one. His long life of eighty-seven years was brought to a close June 17, 1743. In the row of slate stones in ye Old Burying Ground, his is the eleventh, or the second from the further end; and that of his wife, who died three years later, has been placed beside it. This couple lived together sixty-four years. The schools of Charlestown beyond the Neck—Revolutionary period Frank Mortimer Hawes (Continued.) Our account of the school beyond Charlestown Neck has been brought down to 1754. The object of this paper will be to continue its history to 1793. After the bounds of Medford were definitely established, there were left three school districts, which we, not the records, have chosen to call the Milk Row, the Alewife Brook, and the Gardner Row. The first of these embraced nearly the whole of what is now Somerville; the second may be said to have extended from th
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