hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 10 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 10 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 8 0 Browse Search
Hon. J. L. M. Curry , LL.D., William Robertson Garrett , A. M. , Ph.D., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 1.1, Legal Justification of the South in secession, The South as a factor in the territorial expansion of the United States (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 4 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 68 results in 25 document sections:

1 2 3
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Organization of the two governments. (search)
nson (1862-3) Governor Thomas E. Bramlette (1863-7) Maryland Governor Thomas H. Hicks (1857-61) Governor A. W. Bradford (1861-5) Missouri Governor C. F. Jackson (1861) Union Governor H. R. Gamble (1861-4) Governor T. C. Fletcher (1864-8) N. B.-The Confederate Government of Kentucky was provisional in its character. George W. Johnson was elected Governor by the Russellville Convention in November, 1861. He served until he was killed in action at the battle of Shiloh. Richard Hawes was elected by the Provisional Council of Kentucky to succeed him, and acted as the Confederate Provisional Governor of Kentucky from 1862 until the close of the war.-In Missouri Thomas C. Reynolds was the Confederate Governor from 1862 to 1865; but after 1861 a Confederate Governor of Missouri was little more than a name.-In Tennessee, Governor Harris being ineligible to a fourth term, Robert L. Caruthers was elected Governor in August, 1863. Tennessee and her capital being then oc
n who hauled down the American flag after Colonel Mulligan's surrender at Lexington, was arrested as a spy. The Bowling Green Courier publishes what purports to be a message from George W. Johnson, who signs himself Provisional Governor, addressed to Mr. President and Gentlemen of the Legislative Council. The so-called Provision Council has been organized as follows: President of Council, Willis B. Machen, of Lyon; State Treasurer, Judge T. L. Burnett, of Spencer; State Auditor, Capt. Richard Hawes, of Bourbon; Secretary of State, Robert McKee, of Louisville; Clerk of Council, A. Frank Brown, of Pulaski; State Printer, W. N. Haldeman, of Oldham; Sergeant-at-Arms, John E. Thompson, Jr., of Mercer.--N. Y. Times, Dec. 14. A skirmish occurred to-day on the banks of Green River, Ky. Company I of the Fifteenth Ohio was attacked by about one hundred and fifty rebel cavalry, who had dismounted from their horses and approached the patriots unobserved. The rebels fired one round wit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
agg, Polk; and Hardee had been kept thoroughly informed of Buell's march and of the exposure of his flank, which presented an inviting opportunity for attack, but so worn and wearied was the condition of our army that these officers did not feel justified in attempting an aggressive movement. On the 28th Bragg left Bardstown with his staff to confer with Kirby Smith at Lexington, and then proceeded to Frankfort, where, on the 4th of October, a day was occupied in the installation of the Hon. Richard Hawes as Confederate Provisional Governor of the Commonwealth. While these events were happening Buell was making active preparations for an aggressive campaign. On the 26th Major-General Wright, commanding the Department of the Ohio, went from Cincinnati to Louisville to confer with him, and on the 27th General Halleck issued an order placing Buell in command of the troops of both departments, then in Louisville. There has been much controversy as to the strength of the opposing armi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., East Tennessee and the campaign of Perryville. (search)
ond night at Salt River. The enemy's pickets were encountered on all of the roads within a few miles of the city, increasing in strength as the movement progressed, and opposing a sharp opposition at Bardstown and Shelbyville. Polk withdrew his army from Bardstown on the night of the 3d, going through Springfield, and Sill, against a considerable resistance, pushed back the force in front of him toward Frankfort. These measures brought to a hurried completion the inauguration of Provisional Governor Hawes at Frankfort on the 4th, under the supervision of General Bragg. Polk, on his part, was pressed so closely that Hardee, who was bringing up his rear, was compelled to make a stand at Perryville and call for assistance. Assuming that Smith was the object of my attack, and that my right and rear would thereby be exposed to Polk at Bardstown, Bragg ordered Polk on the 2d to attack in that manner, while Smith should attack my left, and that view of my design was persisted in; so that
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 7.83 (search)
s against Perryville, and that the main attack would surely fall on him. Thus urged, General Bragg, against his own judgment, yielded, and detached two of his best divisions (Withers's and Cheatham's) to Smith's aid. The former division could not be recalled in time, and the latter arrived the morning of the battle. Having placed General Polk in command of the troops, Bragg had gone to Frankfort, the capital of the State of Kentucky, to witness the inauguration of the secessionist governor, Hawes. The inaugural was being read when the booming of cannon, shortly followed by dispatches from our cavalry outposts, announced the near presence of the enemy. As the hall was chiefly filled by the military, who hurried away to their respective commands, the governor was obliged to cut short his inaugural address. The field of Perryville was an open and beautiful rolling country, and the battle presented a grand panorama. There was desperate fighting on both sides. I saw a Federal batte
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 19: events in Kentucky and Northern Mississippi. (search)
is duty to you, his country, and his God. From Mumfordsville Bragg's troops moved northward without opposition, and, on the 1st of October, formed a junction with those of Kirby Smith, at Frankfort, where they performed the farce of making Richard Hawes, formerly a Congressman, Provisional Governor of Kentucky. Oct. 4. At the same time Bragg's plundering bands were scouring the State under the provisional administration of bayonets, dashing up sometimes almost to Louisville, and driving awaons; two under Hardee, and one each under Anderson, Cheatham, and Buckner: the whole immediately commanded by Major-General Polk. Smith was retreating farther to the east, taking with him the Provisional Government in the person of poor Governor Hawes, and Withers had been sent to assist him. There was a sharp engagement early in the morning of the 8th, when the Confederates attempted to repel the brigade of Colonel D. McCook, Composed of the Eighty-fifth, Eighty-sixth, and One Hundred a
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 12: operations against Richmond. (search)
now addressed themselves. Reconnoissances to ascertain the strength and exact position of the Confederate army, were put in motion. Sheridan was sent out southward on the afternoon of the 28th, with the brigades of Davis, Gregg, and Custer. At Hawes's store, not far from the Tolopatomoy Creek, they encountered and vanquished cavalry under Hampton and Fitzhugh Lee. Both parties were dismounted and fought desperately. The Confederates lost nearly eight hundred men, and the Nationals about one half that number. This success inspirited the army, and it was followed by a reconnoissance in force, May 29. in which Wright moved on Hanover Court-House; Hancock marched from Hawes's store in the same direction; Warren pushed out toward Bethesda Church, and Burnside held a position to assist either Hancock or Warren. The right and rear were covered by Wilson's cavalry. This movement quickly developed Lee's position, which was in front of the Chickahominy, and covering the railway from we
, 2.435; visit of President Lincoln to, 2.442. Hart, Peter, accompanies Mrs. Anderson to Fort Sumter, 1.138. Hartsville, b<*>e of, 2.541; repulse of Marmaduke at, 3.212. Hatchee River, battle of, 2.523. Hatcher's Run, extension of Grant's line to, 3.535. Hatteras Inlet, expedition against the forts at, 2.106; the Burnside expedition at, 2.168. Hatteras Island, sufferings of the Twentieth Indiana regiment on, 2.109. Havana, reception of Mason and Slidell at, 2.154. Hawes, Richard, made provisional governor of Kentucky by Bragg and Kirby Smith, 2.507. Hayne, Mr., Commissioner to Washington from South Carolina, 1.285. Hazard, Commander S. F., in the Burnside expedition, 2.167. Hazen, Gen., Wm. B., at the battle of Murfreesboroa, 2.546; movements of near Chattanooga, 3.125; at the battle of Chickamauga, 3.186; captures Fort McAllister, 3.412. Heintzelman, Gen., at the battle of Bull's Run, 1.598, 600; at the battle of Oak Grove, 2.417. Helena, Mo., ba
his first and highest duty. A favored officer in our regular army transmitted his resignation, to be tendered in case his State seceded, and was not cashiered therefor, as he should have been promptly and finally. All over the South, men said, This Secession is madness — it will ruin all concerned — I have resisted it to the best of my ability — but my State has seceded nevertheless, and I must go with my State. But, on the other hand, Sterling Price, Humphrey Marshall, James B. Clay, Richard Hawes, Simon B. Buckner, William Preston, Charles S. Morehead, and scores like them — in good part old Whigs, who could not help knowing better — never seemed to imagine that the refusal of their respective States to secede laid them under the smallest obligation to restrain their traitorous propensities. State Sovereignty was potent only to authorize and excuse treason to the Union--never to restrain or prevent it. XIII. The Southern leaders entered upon their great struggle with the
llicoffer at Wild Cat Nelson at Piketon Schoepf's retreat Rebel Government organized at Russellville Geo. W. Johnson made Governor Kentucky gravely admitted into the Southern Confederacy full delegation sent to the Congress at Richmond Richard Hawes finally declared Governor. we have seen P. 492-7. that Kentucky emphatically, persistently, repeatedly, by overwhelming popular majorities, refused — alike before and after the formal inauguration of war by the Confederate attack on Forhaps from their inability to make any provision for its support. Geo. W. Johnson, of Scott county, was here chosen Governor; Johnson being killed in the battle at Shiloh next Spring, he was somehow succeeded in his shadowy Governorship by Richard Hawes — a weak old man who, some quarter of a century before, had twice represented, as a Whig, the Lexington district in Congress. the party having had enough of popular elections, in which they never had any success or made a respectable figure.
1 2 3