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Guy C. Hawkins papers—number I In 1905 the Somerville Historical Society received through Mrs. Alice E. Lake, one of its loyal members, a package of papers that formerly belonged to her father, the late Guy C. Hawkins, of Somerville. They were all penned with his own hand. Several of these documents relate to the separatioGuy C. Hawkins, of Somerville. They were all penned with his own hand. Several of these documents relate to the separation of Somerville from Charlestown, and possess much general interest. They give us some idea of the feeling which prevailed in this section before the decisive step was taken. It is the purpose of the editor to give to the public some of these manuscripts from time to time. The one selected for this number of Historic Leaves beaion, we infer that it was written in 1824 or 1825, and that the statistics were taken from the town records for the fiscal year 1823-4. It will be noticed that Mr. Hawkins classes himself among the young men. (The orthography is that of the original.) Petitioners for a Seperation of the Town of Charlestown. Names of Resid
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, A short Autobiography of Guy C. Hawkins (search)
A short Autobiography of Guy C. Hawkins [In connection with the Guy C. Hawkins papers begun in this issue of Historic Leaves, the following short autobiographical scrap may be of interest. We are indebted to Mrs. Alice E. Lake for this contribution.] It is a melancholy pleasure to look back upon those who have passed away, who exist in our memories, as the relics of departed joys, and who yet make up a part of the countless ligaments which bind us to life. The changes of a short transitory life are matters of little moment except to the individuals themselves, unless the example is a warning or pattern to those who come after us. I was born and bred in a village of New England contiguous to the capital, the son of a farmer of some property, formerly an officer in the army of the Revolution. The individuals composing this community were in a comparative equality, for although a part were owners of the soil and others but tenants and laborers, yet industry gave all an indep
Historic leaves, volume 5, April, 1906 - January, 1907, Guy C, Hawkins papers.—number 2, (search)
Guy C, Hawkins papers.—number 2, [Sketches of some of the reasons Which may be adduced before a committee of the Legislature in favor of a separation of the town of Charlestown.] This appeal of the petitioners to the Legislature for a seperation from the town of Charlestown is made to you tinder peculiar circumstances and from more than ordinary reasons. Not only do we contend that the territory is sufficient for two towns, and that as a matter of convenience it is highly expedient, but we do complain of a variety of oppressive grievances, of unjust and unequal burthens. I would have it distinctly understood, however, that, although we do insist on these considerations as our most important reasons for a division, yet we do not implicate the town or charge its officers with partiality. As individuals, as a municipal community, they have our most unlimited confidence and respect. This inequality is in the nature of things; it grows out of the unnatural connection of the tw
(president), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Benjamin Thompson, Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey. 1831, the same, except that Mr. Walker was succam. 1832, Paul Willard, Esq., Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Guy C. Hawkins, John Runey, James K. Frothingham (president), Henry Jaques, Jo Benjamin Thompson (secretary), Paul Willard, Esq. (treasurer), Guy C. Hawkins, Joseph F. Tufts, Charles Thompson, Chester Adams. 1834, the Miss Wiley was succeeded by Miss Mary Dodge. John Runey and Guy C. Hawkins had charge of the outside schools, and were empowered to take anow allowed to be kept through the entire year. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to make such arrangements as may be thought best in Milk Row reported that repairs were necessary. It was left to Messrs. Hawkins and Thompson to make the same. April 25, 1831, John Sweetser y, $500. At the close of the season, on the recommendation of Mr. Hawkins, the services of John N. Sherman were retained at Milk Row at $3
ds at the Gardner districts. Miss Jeffurds is allowed to keep some private scholars not exceeding six, and to receive compensation there from. Messrs. Runey and Hawkins are empowered to attend to the schools outside the Neck, the same as last year. They engage for the winter term Miles Gardner, for the Gardner school; Elliot Valy in November, at $32 per month; and H. K. Curtis for the Russell district, four months, at $30. The care of the outside schools was assigned to Messrs. Adams and Hawkins for the trustees. At a special meeting held June 20, 1833, it was voted that teachers of the public schools be requested to parade their scholars on the day of ty—June 24. The petition of John Tufts and others praying for a removal of the schoolhouse in Milk Row was referred to Messrs. Willard, Frothingham, and (later) Hawkins. This seems to be the first move on record looking to the establishment of the Prospect Hill school on Medford street. Voted that teachers receive no scholar int
95, 96, 99. Harvard Street, 59, 81. Haskell, Albert L., 53. Hastings, Joseph S., 48, 67. Hathern, L., 15. Hawes, Frank Mortimer, 16. 46, 53, 67, 92. Hawes, Mather E., 90. Hawes School, South Boston, 67. Hawkins, Christopher, 11. Hawkins, Guy C., 11, 26, 48, 49, 50, 52, 67, 69, 76. Hawkins, Guy C., Papers, 10-15, 40-45. Hawkins House, 55, Hay, Sarah G., 82. Hay, Esther M., 81, 82. Hayes Estate, 63. Hazelton, Amos, 10, 49, 72. Heald, Helen E., 53. Hemlock Wood. 1, 8. HeHawkins, Guy C., Papers, 10-15, 40-45. Hawkins House, 55, Hay, Sarah G., 82. Hay, Esther M., 81, 82. Hayes Estate, 63. Hazelton, Amos, 10, 49, 72. Heald, Helen E., 53. Hemlock Wood. 1, 8. Henchman, Nathaniel H., 11, 17, 18. Henderson, C. E., 53. Higginson, Colonel T. W., 6, 37. Highland Avenue, 46, 53, 57, 85. High Street, Boston, 4. Hill, Ephraim, 74. Hill, Ives, 54. Hill, J. D., 12. Hilliard, A. S., 31, 33. Historical Society, Somerville. 88. Historical Society, Somerville, Officers of, 84. Hoit, A. G., 21. Holden, Bertha E., 53. Holden, Oliver, 73. Hollis Hall, 6. Holmes, O. W., 3, 53. Holmes' Field, 6. Holroyd, John, 20, 22. Holt, Chauncey, 90. Hoope
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908,
Union Square
and its neighborhood about the year 1846. (search)
topher Hawkins, a road master on the Fitchburg railroad. On the north side of Washington street, west of the bridge, stood the ancient lean-to house owned by Guy C. Hawkins. It was said, and also disputed, that this was an old Revolutionary house, and that it had been loop-holed for musketry. It was occupied by Alonzo Burbank, sly it was reached by a court from Bow street. Further west, and back from the avenue in the field, was the home, surrounded with orchards and gardens, of Colonel Guy C. Hawkins. Mr. Hawkins' widow afterwards became Mrs. Mann. Her children were Mrs. Alice E. Lake, N. Carleton Hawkins, and Eben C. Mann, Jr. West of and adjoininMr. Hawkins' widow afterwards became Mrs. Mann. Her children were Mrs. Alice E. Lake, N. Carleton Hawkins, and Eben C. Mann, Jr. West of and adjoining the Hawkins estate was the old cemetery, opened about 1804. In its easterly front corner stood the Milk Row primary school, burned in 1859; it was the first school the writer attended in Somerville, and was taught by Miss Adeline E. Sanborn, of whom mention has already been made. Between the cemetery and the bleachery the onl
Historic leaves, volume 6, April, 1907 - January, 1908, Original English inhabitants and early settlers in Somerville.—(Ii.) (search)
on in Somerville. The second person to name is Charles E. Gilman, who was town clerk in 1842 and the faithful town and city clerk forty-six years consecutively and till the time of his death. John C. Magoun was an assessor in 1842, and for thirty years subsequently. He was an overseer of the poor twenty-two years. Edmund Tufts was town treasurer and collector of taxes the first year, and the sum total that passed through his hands was $4,993.97. Other prominent men the first year were Nathan Tufts, Caleb W. Leland, Guy C. Hawkins, Alfred Allen, Levi Russell, Charles Miller, Francis Bowman, Columbus Tyler, Robert Vinal, Thomas J. Leland, Joseph Clark, Dr. Luther V. Bell, James Hill, Captain Edward Cutter, Fitch Cutter, Orr N. Towne, Colonel Samuel Jaques, of Ten Hills Farm renown, Clark Bennett, Samuel T. Frost, and George O. Brastow, all passed away. To continue the narrative down the generations would be foreign to my purpose and fail of historic interest, and I close the book.
, 60. Hagarstown, Md., 20. Hale, Edward A., 17. Hall, Gustina, 10. Hall, Primus, 15. Hall, Samuel, 30. Hamblen,———, 14. Hamilton, President, 73. Hamilton, Va., 20. Hancock's Corp, 58, 63. Hannaford, Edward Francis, 13. Hannaford, Frederick W., 13. Hanover, 61. Harbard, Henry, 31. Harbour, or Harbard, Henry, 31. Harlow, George R., 58. Harper's Ferry, 19. Harris. T. P., 67. Harvard College. 37. Hawes, Frank M., 73, 74, 76. Hawkins, Christopher, 14, 33, 53. Hawkins, Guy C., 14, 15, 33, 53, 55. Hawkins, Nathaniel, 53. Hawkins, N. Carleton, 15, 41. Haven, George D., 9. Hayes, John S., 74, 75, 76. Haymarket, Va., 43. Hazeltine, Amos, 14. Hicks,——--. 73. Highfield, The, 25, 26, 29, 30, 31, 49, 52. Highfield-mead, The. 25, 26. Highland Avenue. 32. Hill Building, 36. Hill, Charles, 9. Hill, Harriet. 9. Hill, Ivers, 11. Hill, James, 55. Hill, James F., 9. Hill, James, Jr., 9. Hill, Richard, 9. Hills' Rebel Corps, 60. Historical
Mr. Coombs, boarded there also. Miss Hawkins was the sister of Guy C. Hawkins, and the house stood on Bow Street, near the site of the Methodist church. It was here that Miss Hawkins opened a private school, to be mentioned later on. She married Henry Adams, Esq., and it was with tl. A school census, taken in 1830, by Messrs. John Runey and Guy C. Hawkins, reports 109 scholars between the ages of four and fifteen in te winter. At the close of the season, on the recommendation of Guy C. Hawkins, it was voted to retain the service of Mr. Sherman for the entiilk Row, and the matter is referred to three trustees, including Mr. Hawkins. This seems to be the first move towards establishing a school trustees for Milk Row district, under the old regime, and after Guy C. Hawkins retired in 1835, were Alfred Allen and James Underwood, one or 10. Somerville benefited by the experience of two old trustees, Guy C. Hawkins and Alfred Allen, who were elected members of our first school
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