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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Chapultepec, battle of (search)
e, 10 feet apart and 12 or 15 feet high. The works were thoroughly armed, and the garrison, among whom were some expert French gunners, was commanded by General Bravo. The whole hill was spotted with forts and outworks. To carry this strong post with the least loss of men, Scott determined to batter it with heavy cannon. Accordingly, on the night of Sept. 11. four batteries of heavy cannon were erected on a hill between Tucabaya and Chapultepec, commanded respectively by Captains Drew, Haynes. and Brooks, and Lieutenant Stone. They were placed in position by the engineer officers Huger and Lee (the latter afterwards commander-in-chief of the Confederate army). On the morning of the 12th these batteries opened fire, every ball crashing through the castle, and every shell tearing up the ramparts. The .fire of the Mexicans was not less severe, and this duel of great guns was kept up all day. The next morning (13th) troops moved to assail the works, at their weakest point, in tw
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut (search)
There were reported missing 389 men and twenty-one officers. Population in 1890, 746,258; in 1900, 908,355. Governors of the Connecticut colony Name.Date. John Haynes1639 to 1640 Edward Hopkins1640 to 1641 John Haynes1641 to 1642 George Wyllys1642 to 1643 John Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas WelJohn Haynes1641 to 1642 George Wyllys1642 to 1643 John Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas Welles1655 to 1656 John Webster1656 to 1657 John Winthrop1657 to 1658 Thomas Welles1658 to 1659 John Winthrop1659 to 1665 Until this time no person could be elected to a second term immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 WilliaJohn Haynes alternately from Edward Hopkins1643 to 1655 Thomas Welles1655 to 1656 John Webster1656 to 1657 John Winthrop1657 to 1658 Thomas Welles1658 to 1659 John Winthrop1659 to 1665 Until this time no person could be elected to a second term immediately following the first. Governors of the New Haven colony Name.Date. Theophilus Eaton1639 to 1657 Francis Newman1658 to 1660 William Leete1661 to 1665 Governors of Connecticut Name.Date John Winthrop1665 to 1676 William Leete1676 to 1683 Robert Treat1683 to 1687 Edmund Andros1687 to 1689 Robert Treat1689 to 1698 Fitz John Winthrop1698 to 1707 Gurdon Saltonstall1707 to 1724 Joseph Talcott1724 to 1741 Jonathan Law1741 to 1750 Roger Wolcott1750 to 1
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Haynes, John 1633-1654 (search)
Haynes, John 1633-1654 Statesman; born in Copford Hall, Essex, England; accompanied Rev. Edward Hooker to Boston in 1633 and in 1635 was chosen governor of Massachusetts. He was one of the best educated of the early settlers in New England, and possessed the qualities of an able statesman. He went to the valley of the Connecticut with Mr. Hooker in 1636; became one of the most prominent founders of the Connecticut colony; was chosen its first governor, in 1639; and served alternately wifirst governor, in 1639; and served alternately with Edward Hopkins until 1654. Mr. Haynes was one of the five who drew up the written constitution of Connecticut, the first ever framed in America (see Connecticut). He was a man of large estate, spotless purity of character, a friend of civil and religious liberty, and was always performing acts of benevolence. He probably did more for the true interests of Connecticut than any other of the earlier settlers. He died in Hartford, March 1, 1654.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts, (search)
ard Winslow1636 to 1637 William Bradford1637 to 1638 Thomas Prince1638 to 1639 William Bradford1639 to 1644 Edward Winslow1644 to 1645 William Bradford1645 to 1657 Thomas Prince1657 to 1673 Josiah Winslow1673 to 1681 Thomas Hinkley1681 to 1686 Sir Edmund Andros, governor-general1686 to 1689 Thomas Hinkley1689 to 1692 Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott (acting)1629 to 1630 Matthew Cradock (did not serve) John Winthrop1630 to 1634 Thomas Dudley1634 to 1635 John Haynes1635 to 1636 Henry Vane1636 to 1637 John Winthrop1637 to 1640 Thomas Dudley1640 to 1641 Richard Bellingham1641 to 1642 John Winthrop1642 to 1644 governors of the Massachusetts colonies— Continued. Massachusetts Bay colony. Name.Term. John Endicott1644 to 1645 Thomas Dudley1645 to 1646 John Winthrop1646 to 1649 John Endicott1649 to 1650 Thomas Dudley1650 to 1651 John Endicott1651 to 1654 Richard Bellingham1654 to 1655 John Endicott1655 to 1665 Richard Belling1665 to 16
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Connecticut, (search)
1638 All free planters convene at Hartford and frame a constitution for civil government......Jan. 14, 1639 First constitution of Connecticut adopted at Hartford......April, 1639 General election held at Hartford......April, 1639 [John Haynes chosen governor.] General election held at Quinipiack (New Haven)......Oct. 25, 1639 [Theophilus Eaton chosen governor.] Milford and Guildford purchased of the Indians and settled......1639 [Laws founded upon and administered accorr war, but Massachusetts refuses assistance......1653 They address Parliament and Cromwell for aid......1653 Colony, ordered by Parliament to treat the Dutch as enemies, seize the Dutch house and lands at Hartford......1654 Death of Governor Haynes......1654 Law against Quakers: to be fined and sent out of jurisdiction......October, 1656 Gov. John Winthrop obtains for Connecticut a charter, with ample privileges, from Charles II......April 20, 1662 Charles II. grants a patent
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Massachusetts (search)
he Dutch trading-houses on the Connecticut River, and bring back flattering reports of that country......1633 Salary of the governor of Massachusetts Bay fixed at £150......1633 Griffin brings 200 passengers, some of them eminent men, as John Haynes, afterwards governor of Massachusetts, John Cotton, Thomas Hooker, and Samuel Stone......1633 Small-pox destroys many of the Indians of Massachusetts......1633 Ipswich settled......1633 Scituate settled......1633 Roger Williams ret of selectmen at Charlestown......Feb. 10, 1635 General court orders the fortifications repaired, appoints a military commission with extraordinary powers to guard the rights and liberties of Massachusetts......March, 1635 Freemen choose John Haynes as governor of Massachusetts, selected by deputies from the towns, before the meeting of the court, the first instance of caucus on record......May 6, 1635 Concord first settled......1635 Richard Dummer founds Newbury......1635 Roger
Lucius R. Paige, History of Cambridge, Massachusetts, 1630-1877, with a genealogical register, Key to the plan of Cambridge in 1635 . (search)
arently not a homestead. 21Edward Stebbins.Nathan Aldus. 22Timothy Stanley.William French. 23Jonas Austin.Katherine Haddon. 24John Hopkins.Edmund Angier. 25Thomas Beale.Thomas Beale. 26Rev. Samuel Stone.Nathaniel Sparhawk. 27Simon Bradstreet, Esq.Herbert Pelham, Esq. House, but apparently not a homestead. 28Abraham Morrill.Thomas Skidmore. 29Samuel Greenhill.— Turges. 30John Pratt.Widow Elizabeth Isaac. 31William Spencer.John Stedman. 32Thomas Spencer.William Dickson. 33John Haynes, Esq.Henry Dunster. 34 Market Place. Now called Winthrop Square.Market Place. 35James Ensign.Edward Goffe. Uncertain whether then occupied by a house or not. 36Rev. Samuel Stone. Vacant lot.Nathaniel Sparhawk. Vacant lot. 37Widow Isabel Sackett.Robert Stedman. 38Matthew Allen.Thomas Chesholme. 39Meeting-house.Meeting-house. 40Samuel Dudley.Robert Sanders. 41William Andrews.Hezekiah Usher. 42William Lewis.John Bridge. 43George Stocking.William Manning. 44Nicholas Olmste
rve the original orthography, together with the number of rods, indicating the relative shares in the impaled ground. Common pales divided as follows:— John Haynes, Esq.70 rods.Steven Hart8 rods. Thomas Dudly, Esq.40 rods.William Wadsworth7 rods. Mr. Symon Bradstreet20 rods.George Steele6 rods. John Benjamin50 rods.Richardniel Richards, John Talcott, William Wadsworth, and John White, arrived at Boston, in the Lion, Sept. 16, 1632, a month after the Braintree Company removed; and John Haynes did not arrive until Sept. 3, 1633. The name of Simon Oakes is erroneously given in Col. Mass. Hist. Soc., VII. 10, instead of Simon Sackett. Precisely how maudley, 22 1/2 acres; Thomas Dudley, Esq., 63 acres; Richard Goodman, 6 acres; William Westwood, 27 acres; John Talcott,. 32 acres; Daniel Denison, 22 1/2 acres; John Haynes, Esq., 63 acres; (these lots severally extended from what is now Main Street to Somerville line; the following lots bordered southerly on the Great Marsh): Wido
it, and so until [it be paid]. Although a general subscription seems to have been contemplated, only two signatures are appended, namely, Thomas Dudley and John Haynes; and Mr. Haynes must have subscribed his name several months after the order was adopted, as he did not arrive until Sept. 3, 1633. At the first meeting holdenMr. Haynes must have subscribed his name several months after the order was adopted, as he did not arrive until Sept. 3, 1633. At the first meeting holden in pursuance of this agreement, several municipal arrangements were made, to secure the beauty and safety of the town, to wit:— Jan. 7, 1632-3. It is ordered, that no person whatever [shall set] up any house in the bounds of this town [without] leave from the major part. Further, it is agreed, by a joint consent, [thale business of the town, and so to continue until the first Monday in November next, and until new be chosen in their room: so there was then elected and chosen John Haynes, Esq., Mr. Symon Bradstreet, John Taylcott, William Westwood, John White, William Wadsworth; James Olmsted, Constable. It is further ordered, by a joint co
ecame Governor, and the next year was an Assistant. Bradstreet was constantly an Assistant; and Haynes, at the first election after his arrival, was elected as an Assistant, and the next year, 1635, iven order that it shall be recorded, and such as desire copies thereof may have the same. John Haynes, Governor, Rich: Bellingham, John Winthrop, Tho: Dudley, John Humfry, Willm. Coddington, Wiass., i. 43. Trumbull suggests that political rivalry was mingled with clerical jealousy. Of John Haynes he says: In 1635 he was chosen Governor of Massachusetts. He was not considered in any respead some influence upon the removal of Mr. Hooker and his friends. It is known that Winthrop and Haynes differed in judgment upon public policy, the former advocating a mild administration of justice,n. Removed to Hartford. Garrad Haddon. Stephen Hart. Removed to Hartford. John Haynes, Esq. Removed to Hartford. Thomas Heate. Removed to Hingham. Rev. Thomas Hooker. Re
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