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Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 28 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 10 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 6 0 Browse Search
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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Democracy in New Netherland. (search)
Dec. 10, 1653. Of the eight districts represented, four were Dutch and four English. Of the nineteen delegates, ten were of Dutch and nine were of English nativity. This was the first really representative assembly in the great State of New York chosen by the people. The names of the delegates were as follows: From New Amsterdam, Van Hattem, Kregier, and Van de Grist; from Breucklen (Brooklyn), Lubbertsen, Van der Beeck, and Beeckman; from Flushing, Hicks and Flake; from Newtown, Coe and Hazard; from Heemstede (Hempstead), Washburn and Somers; from Amersfoort (Flatlands), Wolfertsen, Strycker, and Swartwout; from Midwont (Flatbush), Elbertsen and Spicer; and from Gravesend, Baxter and Hubbard. Baxter was at that time the English secretary of the colony, and he led the English delegates. The object of this convention was to form and adopt a remonstrance against the tyrannous rule of the governor. It was drawn by Baxter, signed by all the delegates present, and sent to the govern
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), George (William Frederick) 1737-1820 (search)
tempt. Washington occupied New York with Continental troops in the summer of 1776. There he received the Declaration of Independence (July 9), and it was read to the army. The same evening a large concourse of soldiers and civilians assembled at the Bowling Green, pulled down the statue, broke it in pieces, and sent a portion to the house of Oliver Wolcott, on the western edge of Connecticut, where it was run into bullets by his family. In a letter to General Gates upon this event, Ebenezer Hazard wrote: His [the King's] troops will probably have melted majesty fired at them. The venerable Zachariah Greene (q. v.) who was present at the pulling down of the statue, said the artist had made an omission of stirrups for the saddle of the horse, and it was a common remark of the soldiers, The King ought to ride a hardtrotting horse without stirrups. Portions of that statue are now in possession of the New York Historical Society. Usual appearance of George II. about 1776. (from
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazard, Ebenezer 1744-1817 (search)
Hazard, Ebenezer 1744-1817 Author; born in Philadelphia, Pa., Jan. 15, 1744; son of Samuel Hazard; was the first postmastergeneral under the Confederation (1782-89), and left the place when the new government was organized under the national Constitution. He graduated at Princeton in 1762. Mr. Hazard published Historical collections, in 2 volumes, in 1792-94; also, Remarks on a report concerning Western Indians. He died in Philadelphia, June 13, 1817.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Hazard, Samuel 1784-1870 (search)
Hazard, Samuel 1784-1870 Archaeologist; born in Philadelphia, May 26, 1784; son of Ebenezer Hazard. In early life he engaged in commerce, and made several voyages to the East Indies before he began a literary career. He was the author of Register of Pennsylvania (1828-36), in 16 volumes; United States commercial and statistical register (1839-42), in 6 volumes; Annals of Pennsylvania, from the discovery of the Delaware in 1609 to the year 1682, in 1 volume; and Pennsylvania archives (1682-1790), in 12 volumes of about 800 pages each. These works are invaluable to historians. He died in Philadelphia, May 22, 1870.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Postal service, federal (search)
Postal service, federal Soon after the commencement of the first session of the first national Congress, Ebenezer Hazard, Postmaster-General, suggested (July 17, 1789) the importance of a reorganization of the Post-office Department. A bill for the temporary establishment of the general post-office was passed soon afterwards. The subject was brought up in Congress from time to time, until the present system in its general features was adopted in 1792. When Franklin resigned the office of Postmaster-General in 1776, the whole number of post-offices in the United States was 75; the whole number on Jan. 1, 1901, was 76,594, classified as follows: First-class, 208; second-class, 941; third-class, 3,280; fourth-class, 72,165; and Presidential, 4,429. Among these were 30,205 money-order offices and 2,085 money-order stations. The entire receipts of the Post-office Department during the administration of Dr. Franklin—about fifteen months—were $27,985, and the expenditures $32,142;
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Chapter 17: writers on American history, 1783-1850 (search)
ith the struggle for national existence. Ebenezer Hazard, in 1779, described the situation as follg history made appeal. It is not strange that Hazard had few people to encourage him. Our post-Ry of that kind was due to the interest of Ebenezer Hazard (1744-1817) and Jeremy Belknap. Born thet forward in the two decades after the war. Hazard first of the two began to collect documents. as not realized, and there is no evidence that Hazard used the money voted. Dismissed from the offiinuation. Judged by what he published merely, Hazard had only a moderate influence on history in theral reader with such a collection that caused Hazard's publication to remain unsold, and to be a source of discouragement to its compiler. Hazard influenced the work of Belknap, who, as a ministerire. Financially it was as great a failure as Hazard's Collections. It was many years before he soends of Belknap and Hazard—and a connection of Hazard's by marriage—was Jedidiah Morse (1761-1826), [3 more...]<
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
110, 111, 115, 117, 123, 124, 126, 132, 133, 149, 207, 209, 226, 227, 246, 255, 316, 320 Haunted Palace, the, 65, 66, 67 d'haussonville, Count, 127, 129 Hawthorne (Hathorne), John, 21 Hawthorne (Hathorne), Nathaniel, 16-31, 33, 38, 63, 64, 67, 165, 168, 173, 202, 232, 249, 362, 369, 369 n., 370, 371, 373, 377, 383, 384, 387, 388, 401, 406, 408 Hayne, Paul Hamilton, 93 n., 288, 291, 292-293, 298, 301, 302, 303, 306, 307, 308, 311, 335, 336, 342 Hayne, Robert Y., 85 Hazard, Ebenezer, 106, 107, 113-114, 115 Hazlitt, William, 206, 258 Health, a, 289 Hearne (directory), 264 n. Heart of the War, the, 280 Heartsease and Rue, 247 Heeren, A. H. L., 112 Hegel, 209, 212, 213 Heidelberg, 34 Heine, 243 von Held, Toni, 357 n. Hemans, Mrs., 398 Henneman, John Bell, 318 Henty, G. A., 404 Herald (N. Y.), 155, 186, 187, 193, 194, 272, 321, 331 Her letter, 242 Herrick, Robert, 243 Het voorspel van den tachtigjarigen oorlog, 139 Heywood, John,
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Book III (continued) (search)
was authorized. The former contains the minutes of the provincial council, and the latter is devoted to other documents of historical importance on the colonial period. These works were edited with much care by Samuel Hazard, son of that Ebenezer Hazard See Book II, Chap. XVI. who as a friend and mentor of Jeremy Belknap had made himself one of the first collectors and publishers of historical documents in this country. Many other states have followed the examples of New York and Pennsies. Then came the Revolution, the sum total of its effects being a powerful factor in the rise to leadership of Philadelphia. Bell was ably succeeded by Robert Aitken. When Jeremy Belknap of Massachusetts was seeking a publisher in 1782, Ebenezer Hazard, an authority for the period, pronounced Aitken the best publisher in America. He was followed by Mathew Carey, one of the greatest publishers, all things considered in their true historical perspective, yet produced by this country. But
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 3 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.), Index (search)
vard studies in classical philology, 464 Harvest, 274 Harvest moon, the, 283 Harvey, Charles M., 66 n. Harvey, W. H., 357 Hattons, The, 296 Haupt, Paul, 585 Haverford College, 479 Hawkes, Francis L., 151, 179 Hawthorne, 6, 35, 44, 68, 85, 98, 99, 110, 277, 291, 305, 416, 478, 489 n., 548, 549, 550, 582 Hay, John, 53, 86, 127, 164, 182, 311, 540 Hayden, F. V., 158 Hayes, I. I., 167 Hayes, R. B., 354 Haym, Otto, 587 Hays, W. S., 514 Haywood, E. H., 438 Hazard, Ebenezer, 535 Hazard, Samuel, 176 Hazard of New fortunes, a, 81, 82 Hazel Kirke, 276, 277 Hazelton, G. C., 290, 292 Hazen, W. B., 160 Hazlitt, 126, 455 Headley, J. T., 162 Heap, Gwin Harris, 152 Hearn, Lafcadio, 155 Hearst, W. R., 329, 330 Heart of Maryland, the, 266, 281 Hearts of Oak, 278 Heart's wild flower, 63 Heathen Chinee, the, 53 Hebel, J. P., 585 Heber, Richard, 454 Heemweh, 585 Heerbrandt, 583 Hegel, 230, 231, 238, 239, 245 Heidelberg (Un