Your search returned 186 results in 29 document sections:

1 2 3
ves firing. Never did men fight better or die, alas! more fruitlessly than did most of Hancock's corps, especially Meagher's Irish brigade, composed of the 63d, 69th, and 88th New York, the 28th Massachusetts, and the 116th Pennsylvania, which dashed itself repeatedly against those impregnable heights, until two-thirds Gen. Meagher, in his official report, says: Of the 1.200 I led into action, only 280 appeared on parade next morning. Among his officers who fell, he mentions Col. Heenan, Lt.-Col. Mulholland, and Maj. Bardwell, 116th Pa.; Maj. Wm. Horgan and Adj. J. R. Young, 88th N. Y.; Maj. James Cavanagh, 69th N. Y.; and Maj. Carraher, 28th Mass. The London Times's correspondent, watching the battle from the heights, and writing front Lee's headquarters, says: To the Irish division, commanded by Gen. Meager, was principally committed the desperate task of bursting out of the town of Fredericksburg, and farming, under the withering fire of the Confederate batteri
ld be, indeed, a pleasing duty for me to speak, in connection with the Sixty-third, of such officers as Captains Gleason, Condon, Moore, and Lieut. James R. Brady, and others, whom it would be difficult for me now to mention without having the leisure to speak of them with adequate commendation. Within the last three months two regiments were incorporated in the brigade. Pennsylvania contributed the One Hundred and Sixteenth; Massachusetts contributed the Twenty-eighth. The fact that Col. Heenan, Lieut.-Col. Mulholland and Major Bardwell, of the first named regiment, were badly wounded, speaks filly for the intrepidity and mettle of the men of which it is composed. Where there are such officers there must be staunch men. The Twenty-eighth Massachusetts volunteers was raised for the Irish Brigade, but, owing to some mistake, was kept aloof from it until, by a most fortunate vicissitude of the war, it was restored to us three or four weeks ago. It is a substantial and splendid
ovement; used both pistol and sabre to good advantage, and captured quite a number of prisoners. Quite an amusing incident occurred in connection with this charge. A section of the Sixth New York independent battery was in the rear, supported by a squadron of the Sixth Ohio. A rebel captain cut his way through to the rear piece, and, putting his hand upon it,cried out--This is my piece. Not by a damned sight, replied a cannonier, and at the same time gave him a blow under the eye, a la Heenan, knocked him from his horse and took him prisoner. Considerable commotion was created in the column for a few minutes, when it was ascertained that Fitz Hugh Lee, with two brigades, was in the rear of us. The First New Jersey, Lieutenant-Colonel Kester commanding, was at once ordered to assist the Sixth Ohio, and from that time till dark both small arms and artillery were in constant use. Captain Walter R. Robbins was at one time completely cut off from the balance of the command; but, plac
A la Heenan --Two negroes, named Harrison and George, slaves of C P Word, got into a fight on Sunday about a five cent piece, but were interrupted by the police, and yesterday received the reward of their valor at the whipping post. Another party — Spencer and William, slaves of J. R. Anderson, and Alfred, slave of R. Archer-had an unfriendly set-to on the Canal Bank, but the appearance of an officer caused a suspension of hostilities, and the belligerents were punished by the Mayor's order. Others of the gang made a "run" on the Canal Bank, and escaped arrest.
The Daily Dispatch: November 28, 1860., [Electronic resource], Heenan again after the "Champion of England." (search)
Heenan again after the "Champion of England." --The Benicia Boy has authorized the editor of the Clipper to state that he would fight Hurst, the Staleybridge Infant, for from $1,000 to $10,000; and that he would give the latter $1,000 to fight in this country. Hurst was anxious to punch the Benicia Boy directly after his inry. Hurst was anxious to punch the Benicia Boy directly after his interview with Sayers. As champion of the English ring he is obliged to fight all comers, but not compelled to leave England. There is a rumor among Heenan's friends that if Hurst will not come here, Heenan will go there, and again contest for the championship. ry. Hurst was anxious to punch the Benicia Boy directly after his interview with Sayers. As champion of the English ring he is obliged to fight all comers, but not compelled to leave England. There is a rumor among Heenan's friends that if Hurst will not come here, Heenan will go there, and again contest for the championship.
A Personal Difficulty, between two white men residing in this city, was settled on Saturday last, by a "resort to arms," on Vauxhall Island, adjoining Mayo's bridge. The contest was after the pattern of that indulged in by Heenan and Sayers, and had nearly the same result, both parties receiving "severe punishment. " As to whether the conqueror was crowned with victorious laurels, or received a "pecuniary recompense" for his exertion, we are not informed.
A Bogus Benicia Boy out West. --At Terre Haute, Ind., there lived a notorious rowdy named Jim Wright, who bore such a resemblance to Heenan that he was called the Benecia Boy, and as such lately visited "Honest Old Abe" at Springfield, by whom he was received in the most distinguished style. At Terre Haute he quarrelled with a stranger over a plate of oysters, last week, and was shot through the head for his pains.
The Belt given up. --From Bell's Life we learn that Sayers has given up the Champion's Belt, though not without reluctance, and that it has been handed over to the Staley bridge Infant. Some $600 remain to be paid on the new belts, and Bell's Life appeals to the friends of Sayers and Heenan to raise it at once, otherwise they must remain with the maker.
Prize fight. --The interest that was everywhere excited in regard to the sports of the ring by the "international mill" between Sayers and Heenan, died out almost as suddenly as it sprang into existence, and of late we have heard nothing of those refined pugiliarie expressions which were then as familiar as household words. Nevertheless, we are to day enabled to convey to the world the gratifying intelligence that the ring has still some devoted disciples, and that although "science" has slumbered, it is not dead! The important intelligence has been communicated to no that a regular built, out and out prize fight, with all its attendant ceremonies, took place yesterday morning, near this city. The principals in this grand and animating contest are natives of the Old World: one representing Ireland and the other England. With a select party of friends, they proceeded down the river, at an early hour, to the spot designated for the heroic combat, and there, in defiance of the ug
Mace.--Jim Mace, who recently whipped the Staley bridge Infant, has replied to Heenan's challenge, and signifies his readiness to fight. He is ready to make a matchGeo. Wiikes, and it is said by him that "he expects soon to be able to announce Heenan's aspent to the proposition of Mace, and the arrangement of the preliminaries." Heenan challenged any man in England for £2,000 ($10,000,) but Mace does not seem willing to accept so large a stake, and accuses Heenan of bouncing Heenan wantHeenan of bouncing Heenan wants his expenses paid, if he fights in England, or will pay Mace's if comes to America. Mace says: "It is a rale of the English prize ring that the Champion Belt cannHeenan wants his expenses paid, if he fights in England, or will pay Mace's if comes to America. Mace says: "It is a rale of the English prize ring that the Champion Belt cannot be fought for out of the United Kingdom." The match is in a fair way of being made up, and it is believed by sporting gentlemen that, before the winter is over HeeHeenan and Mace will have fought for and decided the ownership of the "belt." William Jemillinon, more familiarly known in English sporting circles as the "Game Ohi
1 2 3