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orced by railroad from Humboldt to Memphis and the military road from Mason's depot—twentyeight miles from Fort Pillow. III. The main body of General Polk's command is to be at Humboldt, which is central to Memphis, Jackson, Grand Junction, Henderson, Corinth, and Fort Pillow. IV. A rear guard of two (2) regiments and five hundred cavalry to be stationed at Union City. V. A battalion of infantry to be stationed at Paris, from Humboldt, with say five hundred cavalry, which, together wps now there, viz., Lea's and Browder's regiments, and stragglers collected, to be ordered by General Polk to report to General Ruggles at Corinth, forthwith. The 7th Mississippi regiment, now at Jackson, Tennessee, to be ordered by Bragg to Henderson. Organization. Three or more regiments, or about twenty-five hundred effective men, to a brigade. Two brigades to a division. To each brigade one battery of six guns, either four smooth-bore and two howitzers, or four rifles and two
. 28, 1866. 58,925WarthOct. 16, 1866. 60,021LenherNov. 27, 1866. 87,595RoganMar. 9, 1869. 92,068MacphersonJune 29, 1869. 94,187DavisAug. 31, 1869. 94,677WarthSept. 7, 1869. 97,233Rupertus et al.Nov. 23, 1869. 104,247BartramJune 14, 1870. 114,294HouseMay 2, 1871. 115,872LesterJune 13, 1871. 127,430ReeceJune 4, 1872. 127,965HeidenthalJune 11, 1872. 130,557BartramAug. 20, 1872. 135,536FollettFeb. 4, 1873. 137,321RoganApr. 1, 1873. (Reissue.)5,388SmithApr. 29, 1873. 139,245Henderson et al.May 27, 1873. 140,654SmithJuly 8, 1873. 159,183KappmeyerJan. 26, 1875. 159,956O'NeilFeb. 16, 1875. 1. (d.) Stationary Shuttles. 12,015RobertsonNov. 28, 1854. 17,366EllithorpeMay 26, 1857. 19,662ParkerMar. 16, 1858. 1. (d.) Stationary Shuttles. (continued). No.Name.Date. 20,699ComfortJune 29, 1858. 27,279DoppFeb. 28, 1860. 34,988SmithApr. 15, 1862. 56,020DulaneyJuly 3, 1866. 62,986WillsonMar. 19, 1867. 105,631BletcherJuly 26, 1870. 2. By revolving Hooks. (a.) Whe
onel Benjamin Harrison, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel McManis 8 399 407   Second Battalion Major Haskins 6 304 310 717   Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, commanding.         Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Captain Henderson 9 316 325   Third Battery, Fourteenth A. C. Major Roatch 8 311 319 644 Seventeenth Army Corps. Colonel A. G. Malloy, commanding.         Field and Staff   3   3   Twentieth Illinois Battery Captain C. C. Cox 1 126 127   Thirtvice for manly and soldierly qualities. A lieutenant of the Second battalion, Fourteenth corps, was also killed, whose name and regiment has not yet been obtained. Among the officers wounded were Captains Benedict, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers; Henderson, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio volunteers; Brown, Twenty-seventh Ohio volunteers, and J. B. Emery, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. The number of men who were left at Nashville, by direction of the surgeons, and from various point
command. commanding officer. officers. men. aggregate. total. Fourteenth Army Corps. Colonel J. G. Mitchell, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel F. W. Lister 8 526 534   Second Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel William O'Brien 4 256 260 794 Twentieth Army Corps. Colonel Benjamin Harrison, commanding.         First Battalion Lieutenant-Colonel McManis 8 399 407   Second Battalion Major Haskins 6 304 310 717   Lieutenant-Colonel Banning, commanding.         Eighteenth Ohio Volunteer Infantry Captain Henderson 9 316 325   Third Battery, Fourteenth A. C. Major Roatch 8 311 319 644 Seventeenth Army Corps. Colonel A. G. Malloy, commanding.         Field and Staff   3   3   Twentieth Illinois Battery Captain C. C. Cox 1 126 127   Thirtieth Illinois Battery Captain J. Kemmitzer 1 208 209   Thirteenth Iowa Infantry Captain C. Haskins 1 186 187   Third Battery, Twentieth A. C. Captain Hurlbut 6 290 296 822
or, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers, and First Lieutenant Samuel W. Thomas, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. They fell, gallantly leading their commands, on the fifteenth of December, in the assault upon the enemy's works. They held high character in the service for manly and soldierly qualities. A lieutenant of the Second battalion, Fourteenth corps, was also killed, whose name and regiment has not yet been obtained. Among the officers wounded were Captains Benedict, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers; Henderson, One Hundred and Twenty-first Ohio volunteers; Brown, Twenty-seventh Ohio volunteers, and J. B. Emery, Eighteenth Ohio volunteers. The number of men who were left at Nashville, by direction of the surgeons, and from various points sent to hospitals in rear, was large, owing to the material of the command-reached eleven hundred during the campaign. Those left at Nashville were reported at five hundred. The number sent back by trains from Limestone Creek reached four hundred, and those
Moore Coles D. Wickersham Cook G. S. Kimberly Cook S. Corning Judd Fulton Charles Sweeney Fulton L. Walker Hamilton M. Couchman Hancock M. M. Morrow Hancock J. M. Finch Hancock Dennis Smith Hancock J. S. Rainsdell Henderson A. Johnson Henderson Ira R. Wills Henry Chas. Durham Henry Morrison Francis Henry J. B. Carpenter Henry J. Osborn Jackson G. W. Jeffries Jasper G. H. Varnell Jefferson Wm. Dodds Jefferson J. M. Pace Jefferson JaHenderson Ira R. Wills Henry Chas. Durham Henry Morrison Francis Henry J. B. Carpenter Henry J. Osborn Jackson G. W. Jeffries Jasper G. H. Varnell Jefferson Wm. Dodds Jefferson J. M. Pace Jefferson James Sample Jersey O. W. Powell Jersey M. Y. Johnson Jo. Daviess David Sheen Jo. Daviess M. Simmons Jo. Daviess Louis Shister Jo. Daviess Thomas McKee Knox J. F. Worrell McLean E. D. Wright Menard Edward Lanning Menard Robert Halloway Mercer Robt. Davis Montgomery Thos. Grey Montgomery W. J. Latham Morgan J. O. S. Hays Morgan J. W. McMillen Morgan D. Patterson Moultrie Dr. Keller Moultrie G. D. Read Ogle W. W. O'Brien Peoria Peter Sweat
William Hepworth Dixon, White Conquest: Volume 1, Chapter 24: White vendetta. (search)
t this evidence was enough. The prisoner was discharged. Disgusted with such law as they found in the Prairie lands, the Bulliners snatched their guns and marked their victims. Sisney was reserved for the anniversary of George's death, but Henderson, his chief supporter, was taken off at once. Jack Bulliner, with two companions, lay behind a heap of logs in Henderson's field, and as the farmer turned his plough, they fired into him a whole round of buck-shot. Henderson lived a week. BefHenderson lived a week. Before he died, he made a statement that, according to his true belief, Jack Bulliner was one of his assailants. In a neighbouring field, a man named Ditmore was at work, and heard the assailing party fire. Within a week, Ditmore was shot. Hinchcliffe was the next to fall. Hinchcliffe, a physician, as well as a postmaster, was often out at night, attending on his patients. He was riding home one evening in the dark, when spits of fire came out of a copse, near the lane, and struck him dead.
n the subsequent reverses of the army, and hence we are cut off from most reliable information concerning the progress of the revival. The seeds of truth were sown by such faithful laborers as Rev. M. B. DeWitt, chaplain of the 8th Tennessee, Rev. Mr. Weaver, of the 28th Tennessee, Rev. Timon Page, of the 52d Tennessee, and Rev. W. H. Browning, chaplain of Gen. Marcus Wright's brigade. In other portions of the army, under the preaching of Rev. S. M. Cherry, Rev. Messrs. Petway, Taylor, Henderson, and scores of other devoted and self-sacrificing ministers, the revival influence became deep and powerful. Rev. L. R. Redding, Methodist, of the Georgia Conference, M. E. Church, South, who labored as a missionary in this army, has furnished us an account of the work in his own and other corps during the winter and spring of 1863-‘64. Beginning his work in Gen. Gist's brigade, and aided by Rev. F. Auld, Rev. A. J. P. De Pass, and other zealous chaplains, he soon witnessed scenes tha
Waitt, Ernest Linden, History of the Nineteenth regiment, Massachusetts volunteer infantry , 1861-1865, Roster of the Nineteenth regiment Massachusetts Volunteers (search)
., priv., (C), July 26, ‘61; 18; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Hecker, Frederick, priv., (C), Mar. 24, ‘64; 28; deserted May 6, ‘64, Fight of Wilderness. Heffron, Wm., priv., (D), July 25, ‘61; 30; re-en. Dec. 21, ‘63; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Heild, Francis, priv., (F), Aug. 6, ‘61; 25; disch. disa. Dec. 19, ‘62. Heill, Frank, priv., (D), July 31, ‘63; 21; sub. John Dwelly; trans. to 20th M. V. Jan. 14, 1865. Heitzzes, John, priv., (K), Feb. 8, ‘65; 20; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Henderson, George, priv., (—), July 31, ‘63; 21; sub. Eugene S. Freeman; N. F.R. Hendley, Robert, priv., (K), Aug. 13, ‘61; 19; wounded June 30, ‘62; N. F.R. Hennesey, Michael, priv., (G), Jan. 26, ‘65; 27; M. O. June 30, ‘65. Henry, James, priv., (G), Aug. 3, ‘63; 25; sub. Geo. W. Nickerson; deserted Nov. 28, ‘63. Henry, John M., priv., (F), Aug. 19, 1861; 40; wounded June 30, 1862; disch. disa. Feb. 4, 1863 in Co. I. Henry, Thomas, priv., (F), Aug. 24, ‘61;
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 3: (search)
ecdotes of them, and particularly of Burke, Porson, and Grattan, with whom he had been intimate; and occupied the dinner-time as pleasantly as the same number of hours have passed with me in England. He gave me a new reading in Macbeth, from Henderson, to whom Mrs. Siddons once read her part for correction, when Mr. Sharp was present. The common pointing and emphasis is:— Macbeth. If we should fail? Lady Macbeth. We fail. But screw your courage to the sticking place, And we'll not fail. No, said Henderson, on hearing her read it thus, that is inconsistent with Lady Macbeth's character. She never permits herself to doubt their success, and least of all when arguing with her husband. Read it thus, Mrs. Siddons:— Macbeth. If we should fail? Lady Macbeth (with contempt). We fail? But screw your courage to the sticking place And we'll not fail. June 7.—This morning I breakfasted with Mr. Sharp, and had a continuation of yesterday,—more pleasant accounts of the
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