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Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Siege of Vicksburg (search)
General Sooy Smith. It was sent immediately to Haines' Bluff, and General C. C. Washburn was assigned to the general command at that point. On the 11th a strong division arrived from the Department of the Missouri under General [Francis J.] Herron, which was placed on our left. This cut off the last possible chance of communication between Pemberton and Johnston, as it enabled Lauman to close up on McClernand's left while Herron intrenched from Lauman to the water's edge. At this point tHerron intrenched from Lauman to the water's edge. At this point the water recedes a few hundred yards from the high land. Through this opening no doubt the Confederate commanders had been able to get messengers under cover of night. On the 14th General [John J.] Parke arrived with two divisions of Burnside's corps, and was immediately dispatched to Haines' Bluff. These latter troops-Herron's and Parke's — were the reinforcements already spoken of sent by Halleck in anticipation of their being needed. They arrived none too soon. I now had about seve
Ulysses S. Grant, Personal Memoirs of U. S. Grant, Johnston's movements-fortifications at Haines' Bluff-explosion of the mine-explosion of the second mine-preparing for the assault-the Flag of truce-meeting with Pemberton-negotiations for surrender-accepting the terms- surrender of Vicksburg (search)
June positive information was received that Johnston had crossed the Big Black River for the purpose of attacking our rear, to raise the siege and release Pemberton. The correspondence between Johnston and Pemberton shows that all expectation of holding Vicksburg had by this time passed from Johnston's mind. I immediately ordered Sherman to the command of all the forces from Haines' Bluff to the Big Black River. This amounted now to quite half the troops about Vicksburg. Besides these, Herron and A. J. Smith's divisions were ordered to hold themselves in readiness to reinforce Sherman. Haines' Bluff had been strongly fortified on the land side, and on all commanding points from there to the Big Black at the railroad crossing batteries had been constructed. The work of connecting by rifle-pits where this was not already done, was an easy task for the troops that were to defend them. We were now looking west, besieging Pemberton, while we were also looking east to defend ours
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
nd sent out expeditions to other places. We have observed, that, on the fall of Vicksburg, Grant was about to send General Herron to the aid of Banks, then besieging Port Hudson, See page 631, volume II. when he heard of the surrender of that post. Herron had already embarked with his troops, when the order was countermanded, and he was sent July 12, 1863. in lighter draft vessels up the Yazoo, for the purpose of capturing a large fleet of steamboats, which had escaped Porter's fleet, an the river. The De Kalb pushed on, and, just as she was abreast the town, the explosion of a torpedo under her sunk her. Herron's cavalry were landed, and, pursuing the steamers up the shore, captured and destroyed a greater portion of them. The remainder were sunk or burned, when? soon afterward, Captain Walker went back after the guns of the De Kalb. Herron captured three hundred prisoners, six heavy guns, two hundred and fifty small-arms, eight hundred horses, and two thousand bales of Con
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
he abandoned the attempt, and determined to grasp Texas by the throat, as it were, by seizing and holding the harbors on its coast. In the mean time, Taylor, still westward of the Atchafalaya, became quite active. His most efficient leader, General Green, was particularly so, and made occasional raids toward the Mississippi. Bushwhackers, as armed residents of the country were called, were continually annoying vessels at sharp turns in the river, in the vicinity of Port Hudson, and General Herron was sent to Morgansia to suppress these gangs of annoyers. An out-post was established several miles in the interior, held by the Nineteenth Iowa and Twenty-sixth Indiana, with two guns, under Colonel Lake, supported by one hundred and fifty cavalry under Colonel Montgomery. The whole number of men at the post was less than one thousand. These were surprised on a dark night by General Green, who stealthily crossed a bayou, Sept. 30, 1863. surrounded the camp, and captured the guns an
ttle of Chickamauga, 3.186; captures Fort McAllister, 3.412. Heintzelman, Gen., at the battle of Bull's Run, 1.598, 600; at the battle of Oak Grove, 2.417. Helena, Mo., battle at, 3.149. Henderson's Bill, La., Gen. Mower at, 3.254. Herron, Gen., his expedition up the Yazoo, 3.148. Hicks, Gov. T. H., loyal action of, 1.196; denounced as a traitor to the Southern cause, 1.197. Hilton Head, occupied by National troops, 2.122. Hindman, T. C., amendment to the constitution proposhe Nashville, 3.190. Writs of Habeas corpus, practical suspension of, 1.449. Wytheville, descent of Averill on lead mines at, 3.314. Y. Yancey, William L., incendiary speeches of, 1.41. Yazoo City, Porter's gun-boats' at, 2.613; Gen. Herron's expedition to, 3.148. Yazoo River, expedition of Gen. McClernand and Admiral Porter on, 2.580; Gen. Ross's expedition on,. 2.586; failure of a third expedition on, 2.588. Yorktown, McClellan's operations before, 2.375; Johnston at, 2.3
ht like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty-five or forty feet, when they poured the contents of their Minie muskets into the enemy, and routed them, though suff
ht like tigers, stood firm as trees, and saved us from utter and overwhelming defeat. Gen. Lyon saw their indomitable perseverance and bravery, and with almost his last breath praised their behavior in glowing terms. Major Porter was all along the line, cheering his men forward, even when bullets fell like hail, and scores were dropping all around him. Companies B, under Lieut. Graham, C, Capt. Mason, who was killed soon after entering into action, F, Capt. Wise, H, Capt. Gottschalk, I, Capt. Herron, and K, Capt. Cook, were in the very thickest of the fight. The three latter were afterward placed in ambush by Capt. Granger of the regulars. Lying down close to the brow of the hill, they waited for another attempt of the enemy to retake their position. On they came, in overwhelming numbers. Not a breath was heard among the Iowas till their enemies came within thirty-five or forty feet, when they poured the contents of their Minie muskets into the enemy, and routed them, though suff
person to swallow a sup of coffee and return to the field. Ambulances were in constant motion, bringing the wounded to the hospitals prepared for their reception, and surgeons were active in relieving the wants of the sufferers. In the action of the day the Iowa regiments had suffered fearfully. Nearly two hundred each had been the loss of the Iowa Fourth and Ninth, and the latter had not a single field officer fit for duty. Its Colonel was commanding a brigade, its Lieutenant-Colonel (Herron) was made prisoner while gallantly cheering his men, after losing a horse and receiving a severe wound, and its Major and Adjutant were disabled and in the hospital. Still none of the men were despondent, but were all ready for the work of the morrow. From the camp of a German regiment, the notes of some plaintive air, possibly a love-ditty, was wafted on the breeze in words unintelligible to my ear. It reminded me that long ago in the Crimea, on the night before the storming of the Malako
al Steele to Helena to cooperate with General Schofield's troops against Little, Rock, and another under Generals Ord and Herron to New-Orleans, to reenforce General Banks for such ulterior operations as he might deem proper to undertake. Some expedundred miles in the rear. Immediately upon learning General Blunt's danger from an overwhelming attack of the enemy, General Herron, by forced marches of one hundred and ten miles in three days, arrived at Fayetteville, Arkansas, early on the mornino crush them both in succession. This skilfully devised project was fortunately frustrated by the valor and endurance of Herron's division, which stoutly held their ground till about two o'clock in the afternoon. When Blunt's forces arrived upon e missing, making a total loss of one thousand one hundred and forty-eight, of which nine hundred and fifty-three were of Herron's division. Early in January, 1863, a rebel force, estimated at from four thousand to six thousand, under Marmaduke, mov
General Lyon's memory.--A soldier of Gen. Herron's division, writes from Springfield, Mo., as follows: General Lyon's memory is cherished by the soldiers here as something holy. The Union men think that no man ever lived like him. The Third division visited the battle-field of Wilson's Creek on Thanksgiving Day, and each man placed a stone on the spot where Lyon fell, so that there now stands a monument some ten feet high, built by eight thousand soldiers, to point out to the visitor of this classic ground the place where the hero died. --Maquoketa Excelsior, January 13.
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