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Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 37 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 27 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 17 3 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 8 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing). You can also browse the collection for Francis J. Herron or search for Francis J. Herron in all documents.

Your search returned 4 results in 2 document sections:

Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Vicksburg, siege of (search)
orter had joined in the fray; but this second assault was unsuccessful. The Nationals had lost about 3,000 men. Then Grant determined on a regular siege. His effective force then did not exceed 20,000 men. The beleaguered garrison had only about 15,000 effective man out of 30,000 within the lines, with short rations for only a month. Grant was soon reinforced by troops of Generals Lanman, A. J. Smith, and Kimball, which were assigned to the command of General Washburne. Then came General Herron from Missouri (June 11) with his division, and then a part of the 9th Corps, under General Parke. With these troops, his force numbered nearly 70,000 men, and, with Porter's fleet, Vicksburg was completely enclosed. Porter kept up a continual bombardment and cannonade for forty days, during which time he fired 7,000 mortarshells, and the gunboats 4,500 shells. Grant drew his lines closer and closer. He kept up a bombardment day and night. The inhabitants had taken shelter in caves d
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Yazoo River fleet. (search)
Yazoo River fleet. General Herron was sent, July 12, 1863, up the Yazoo River with a considerable force in lightdraught steamboats to destroy a Con- Gunboats ascending the Yazoo River. federate fleet lying at Yazoo City. The transports were convoyed by the armored gunboat De Kalb. When they approached the town the garrison and vessels fled up the river, and were pursued. When the De Kalb was abreast the town she was sunk by the explosion of a torpedo. Herron's cavalry landed and pursued the vessels up the shore, destroying a greater portion of them. The remainder were sunk or burned by the Confederates. Herron captured 300 prisoners, six heae Kalb was abreast the town she was sunk by the explosion of a torpedo. Herron's cavalry landed and pursued the vessels up the shore, destroying a greater portion of them. The remainder were sunk or burned by the Confederates. Herron captured 300 prisoners, six heavy guns, some small-arms, 800 horses, and 2,000 bales of cotton.