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Official Records of the Union and Confederate Armies, Chapter XXII: Operations in Kentucky, Tennessee, North Mississippi, North Alabama, and Southwest Virginia. March 4-June 10, 1862. (ed. Lieut. Col. Robert N. Scott), April 29-June 10, 1862.-advance upon and siege of Corinth, and pursuit of the Confederate forces to Guntown, Miss. (search)
nd Fourteenth Michigan Volunteers Yates Sharpshooters, and Hescock's battery, under the command 00 Col. James D. Morgan, Tent Houghtaling's battery assigned to the Second Brigade and Hescock's to the First Brigade. April 28.-Remained in camp. rsacks, arms, and accouterments, when a halt was ordered. Hescock's battery took up a good position on the left with the Fira strong flank work on the right and front of first line. Hescock's battery was placed in position; one section of Houghtalilry, the first division under Colonel Morgan, and Powells, Hescock's, and Houghtaling's batteries, by the main road to Baldwi. Leaving Colonel Morgan, with a part of his division and Hescock's and Houghtaling's batteries, to guard tle right-hand roars, under Lieutenant-Colonel Williams and the batteries of Hescock and Houghtaling. By order of Major-General Pope: sd fire at about the same distance on our right, in front. Hescock's battery took position and opened on this latter. The sk
an believe the deserters, has been very severe. One deserter to-day informs us that in his regiment ten were killed and ninety wounded. As they stood so much thicker on the ground, it is reasonable to suppose that their loss was heavier than our own. Lieut.-Col. Miles, of the Forty-seventh Illinois, was killed. There was but few casualties in the Ohio brigade, as it was held in reserve at the batteries. Most of the killed and wounded were in the Iowa cavalry and Illinois infantry, and Hescock's battery. The last-named battery was handled most beautifully. To-day Gen. Nelson is closing up the Four Mile Gap, and soon the word will be forward. The rebels have greatly the advantage by their knowledge of the country, as well as in position and superiority in numbers. The country is very much broken, with many running streams between the hills, on either side of which there are marshes from fifty yards to half a mile in width, which are impassable to horses and wagons. We have
ad, however, in the mean time, ordered forward Colonel Laiboldt's brigade, and Hescock's battery, so that I felt myself well prepared and strong enough to receive thith one section of his battery, and Lieutenant Taliaferro, with one section of Hescock's battery, driving the enemy's batteries from every position they took. Abo their appearance on my left, and the enemy opened on him. I then advanced Captain Hescock's battery to a very good position in front of the belt of timber, where hereek; advancing at the same time six regiments to support him. The fire of Captain Hescock was here very severely felt by the enemy, who attempted to dislodge him by establishing a battery at short-range; but the firing of Hescock's battery was still so severe, and his shots so well directed and effective, as to force the enemy'try, leading their troops at all times. Neither can I speak too highly of Captains Hescock and Barnett, and the officers and men of their batteries. I respectfull
caissons, which were at one time cut off and in the rebel lines. My loss of men was six killed, seventeen wounded, two paroled and one missing. I remain, sir, your obedient servant, Captain A. K. Bush, Commander Fifth Indiana Battery, To Captain Hescock, Chief of Artillery, Sheridan's Division. Major Hamrick's report. headquarters Twenty-Third regiment Kentucky infantry, camp in front of Murfreesboro, Tenn., January 5, 1863. Captain R. Southgate, A. A. G., Third Brigade, Second Divthe Forty-fourth Illinois volunteers. May their relatives find a consolation, as their comrades do, in the thought that their death was on a battle-field, for the righteous cause wins immortal laurels for the slain. I cannot omit to mention Capt. Hescock, First Missouri battery, that on December thirty-first, as oftentimes before, did splendid execution. The skill and bravery of its officers are almost proverbial, and need not be further enumerated by me but to express my heartiest gratifica
hich no limber was found. This gun has since been ascertained to be one of the guns of Lumsden's battery, captured by the enemy on the nineteenth, and has been returned to that battery. Besides the two pieces above-named, a six-pounder, smooth-bore, and another piece, description not now known, and seven caissons, were captured. The wagons contained some quartermaster's property, but were mainly loaded with ammunition for artillery and infantry. Two of General Rosecrans's escort and Captain Hescock, of the First Missouri Federal light artillery, Battery G, were captured on the side of the ridge west of Villetoe's house, where many other prisoners were picked up by our skirmishers. My engagements were such at this period as to prevent me from looking after or estimating the number or value of articles captured. Many of the wagons were subsequently removed by other commands in rear of mine. I now estimate the wagons captured at about thirty, a few of which had teams attached.
ery was silenced in a very short time by Bush's and Hescock's batteries, of my division, and two of the enemy'sgade, which had a direct fire on its front; also by Hescock's and Houghtaling's batteries, which had an obliqueh the enemy was approaching under a heavy fire from Hescock's, Houghtaling's, and Bush's batteries. After th take position at the angle of these two lines, Captain Hescock sending one section of his battery, under Lieutbattery, to the same point; the remaining pieces of Hescock's and Bush's batteries were placed on the right of Lieutenant Taliaferro, commanding the section of Hescock's battery, having been killed, and several of his ho the front. At the same time I put four pieces of Hescock's battery into action near by and on the same front placed on the right of Palmer's division, also Captain Hescock's pieces, that point having been given up to th of the General commanding, the good conduct of Captain Hescock, Chief of Artillery, whose services were almost
the settled convictions of her people, by the habits of her successive generations, and by express provisions of her Constitution. And let us therefore never seek to repress the criticism of a minority, however small, upon the character and conduct of any administration, whether State or national. It is probable that the occurrence spoken of in the following letter of Colonel Lee caused the Governor to incorporate in his address the paragraph quoted:— Boston, May 13. Messrs. Cartes, Hescock, Bird, and others, Quincy Market. Dear Sirs,—The Sunday papers report the extortion of one hundred dollars from a produce-dealer named Walker, who seriously and jestingly expressed sympathy with the secessionists, and hoped that our troops would starve. The receipt of this money casts a slur upon the reputation of our State, and upon the sincerity of all the generous men who freely contributed. It must be returned at once, or we are disgraced: our cause is too good to be injured with
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Chickamauga. (search)
n, for which no limber was found. This gun has since been ascertained to be one of the guns of Lumsden's battery, captured by the enemy on the 19th, and has been returned to that battery. Besides the two pieces above named, a six-pounder smooth-bore, and another piece, description not now known, and seven caissons captured. The wagons contained some quartermaster's property, but were mainly loaded with ammunition for artillery and infantry. Two of General Rosencranz's escort, and Captain Hescock, of the First Missouri Federal Light Artillery, Battery G, were captured on the side of the ridge west of Villetoe's house, where many other prisoners were picked up by our skirmishers. My engagements were such at this period as to prevent me from looking after or estimating the number or value of articles captured. Many of the wagons were subsequently removed by other commands in rear of mine. I now estimate the wagons captured at about thirty, a few of which had teams attached.