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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Bragg's invasion of Kentucky. (search)
th, in a letter dated July 14th, 1862, estimated Stevenson's division at 10,000, Heth's and McCown's at 10,000, Morgan's cavalry 1300. Official Records, Vol. XVI., Pgades of McCray and McNair were under command of General T. J. Churchill. General Henry Heth, with a force nearly 4000 strong, was ordered to march direct to Barboursrther advance of the Confederates. Although his troops were quite weary and General Heth was far to the rear, General Smith determined upon an immediate attack. He five thousand. The enemy supposed it much greater, their estimate including General Heth, but his division did not join General Smith until the day after the battle.ed with success, and reinforced by about four thousand troops just arrived under Heth, the victorious army moved forward to Lexington, and was designated by its commaracticable to Louisville, and to destroy the Louisville and Nashville Railroad. Heth, with a division of infantry and a brigade of cavalry, marched north; some of hi
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., Morgan's cavalry during the Bragg invasion. (search)
ay, made a rapid march of some 90 miles, and captured the garrison, 150 strong, of the stockade fort erected for the protection of the railroad bridge over Salt River, 17 miles south of Louisville. The bridge was burned in pursuance of the programme to destroy rail communication between Bowling Green and-Louisville. By order of General Smith, the command was then divided for separate service. I was ordered to proceed with 600 men of the 2d Kentucky to the vicinity of Covington, whence General Heth, who had threatened Cincinnati, was then retiring. Colonel Morgan was ordered, with the remainder of the regiment, Gano's squadron, and all the cavalry recruits then organized, to march to the assistance of General Marshall in the mountains of eastern Kentucky. The Federal general, George W. Morgan, had evacuated Cumberland Gap, and followed by Stevenson, who had been instructed to observe and pursue him if he moved, was making his way to the Ohio. It was intended that Marshall and Mor
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The Confederate army. (search)
Gen..Ambrose P. Hill (w), Brig.-Gen. R. E. Rodes, Maj.-Gen. James E. B. Stuart. Staff loss: k, 2; w, 3 = 5. Light division. Maj.-Gen. Ambrose P. Hill, Brig.-Gen. Henry Heth (w), Brig.-Gen. William D. Pender (w), Brig.-Gen. James J. Archer. Staff loss: k, 2; w, 2 = 4. Heth's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry Heth, Col. J. M. BrockeHeth's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Henry Heth, Col. J. M. Brockenbrough: 40th Va., Col. J. M. Brockenbrough, Lieut.-Col. F. W. Cox (w), Capt. T. E. Betts; 47th Va., Col. Robert M. Mayo; 55th Va., Col. Francis Mallory (k), Lieut.-Col. William S. Christian (w), Maj. A. D. Saunders (k), Lieut. R. L. Williams, Maj. Evan Rice; 22d Va. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. E. P. Tayloe. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 27Brig.-Gen. Henry Heth, Col. J. M. Brockenbrough: 40th Va., Col. J. M. Brockenbrough, Lieut.-Col. F. W. Cox (w), Capt. T. E. Betts; 47th Va., Col. Robert M. Mayo; 55th Va., Col. Francis Mallory (k), Lieut.-Col. William S. Christian (w), Maj. A. D. Saunders (k), Lieut. R. L. Williams, Maj. Evan Rice; 22d Va. Battalion, Lieut.-Col. E. P. Tayloe. Brigade loss: k, 33; w, 270 =303. Thomas's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. E. L. Thomas: 14th Ga., Col. R. W. Folsom; 35th Ga., Capt. John Duke; 45th Ga., Lieut.-Col. W. L. Grice; 49th Ga., Maj. S. T. Player. Brigade loss: k, 21; w, 156 = 177. Lane's Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James H. Lane: 7th N. C., Col. E. G. Haywood (w), Lieut.-Col. J. L. Hill (k), Maj. William L. David
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The first day at Gettysburg. (search)
changed the rendezvous of his army to Cashtown, which place Heth reached on the 29th. Next day Heth sent Pettigrew's brigadHeth sent Pettigrew's brigade on to Gettysburg, nine miles, to procure a supply of shoes. Nearing this place, Pettigrew Map 11: positions July 1st: leaders. At 8 A. M., July 1st, Buford's scouts reported Heth's advance on the Cashtown road, The opening of the battltransfer them to the north. of the town to meet Ewell. As Heth advanced, he threw Archer's brigade to the right, Davis's te was much glory. After the repulse of Davis and Archer, Heth's division was formed in line mostly south of the Cashtown he corps Assault of Brockenbrough's Confederate Brigade (Heth's division) upon the Stone barn of the McPherson farm. Trson woods, where a part of Archer's Confederate brigade of Heth's division was captured by Meredith's brigade.--editors. alf of Gamble's dismounted men south of the Fairfield road. Heth's division had suffered so severely that Pender's had passe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.39 (search)
Incidents of the first day at Gettysburg. from a paper read before the District of Columbia Commandery of the loyal Legion, march 2d, 1887.--editors. by E. P. Halstead, Brevet-Major and Assistant Adjutant-General, U. S. V. Counting the scars in the colors. Soon after daylight on July 1st, General Reynolds, then at Marsh Run, gave orders to move with all possible dispatch to Gettysburg, where General Buford, with a small division of cavalry, was contending against Heth's division of infantry and vastly superior numbers. The First Corps moved promptly, covered a distance of nearly eight miles, and the First Division, commanded by General Wadsworth, reached the field about 10 o'clock in the forenoon. In returning for the Second and Third divisions I met John Burns in the field east of the Seminary, with an old musket on his shoulder and a powder-horn in his pocket, hurrying to the front, looking terribly earnest. When near me he inquired, Which way are the rebels? W
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.42 (search)
July 1st, drawing his corps toward the threatened flank, carried Reynolds to Gettysburg, and Buford's report hastened this movement. Reynolds, who probably never received the Pipe Creek circular, was eager for the conflict, and his collision with Heth assuming the dimensions of a battle, caused an immediate concentration of both armies at Gettysburg. Prior to this, the assembling of Meade's army behind Pipe Creek would have been easy, and all fears of injuring thereby the morale of his troops t. Hill's corps occupied Seminary Ridge, and during the next morning extended its line from the Seminary south nearly to the Peach Orchard on the Emmitsburg road; Trimble--vice Pender, wounded — on the left; Anderson on the right; Pettigrew--vice Heth, wounded — in reserve. Of Longstreet's corps, McLaws's division and Hood's — except Law's brigade not yet up — camped that night on Marsh Creek, four miles from Gettysburg. His Reserve Artillery did not reach Gettysburg until 9 A. M. of the 2d.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.50 (search)
ord and scaled the wall, appealing to his troops to follow him. A few of his disorganized men imitated his heroic example, and died at his feet. General Kemper was wounded in the charge. General J. Johnston Pettigrew's command embraced the following brigades: Archer's Tennessee brigade, commanded by Colonel Fry, of the 13th Alabama; Pettigrew's North Carolina brigade, Jo Davis's Mississippi brigade, and Brock-enbrough's brigade of Virginians, aggregating five thousand troops. All were of Heth's division of A. P. Hill's corps. General Pettigrew was wounded in the charge, but he did not quit the field, and remained in command until he fell at Falling Waters. I will now notice the conduct of Archer's Tennessee brigade. It opened the battle on the first day and lost its brave and gallant commander. While leading his men he was captured by a flank movement made by the enemy. The brigade suffered heavy losses in other ways on that day. When the grand assault was made on the 3d, t
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The opposing forces at Gettysburg, Pa., July 1st-3d, 1863. (search)
Col. Joseph M. Jayne. Brigade loss: k, 12; w, 71 = 83. Sumpter (Ga.) Artillery Battalion, Maj. John Lane: Co. A, Capt. Hugh M. Ross; Co. B, Capt. George M. Patterson; Co. C, Capt. John T. Wingfield (w). Battalion loss: k, 3; w, 21; m, 6 = 30. Heth's division. Maj.-Gen. Henry Heth (w), Brig.-Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew (w). Staff loss: w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew, Col. James K. Marshall (w and c): 11th N. C., Col. Collett Leventhorpe (w); 26th N. C., Col. Henry KMaj.-Gen. Henry Heth (w), Brig.-Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew (w). Staff loss: w, 2. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. J. Johnston Pettigrew, Col. James K. Marshall (w and c): 11th N. C., Col. Collett Leventhorpe (w); 26th N. C., Col. Henry K. Burgwyn, Jr. (k), Capt. H. C. Albright; 47th N. C., Col. G. H. Faribault (w); 52d N. C., Col. James K. Marshall, Lieut.-Col. Marcus A. Parks (w). Brigade loss: k, 190; w, 915 = 1105. Second Brigade, Col. J. M. Brockenbrough: 40th Va., Capt. T. E. Betts, Capt. R. B. Davis; 47th Va., Col. Robert M. Mayo; 55th Va., Col. W. S. Christian; 22d Va. Battalion, Maj. John S. Bowles. Brigade loss: k, 25; w, 123 = 148. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James J. Archer (c), Col. B. D. Fry (w and c), Lieut.-Col. S
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From Gettysburg to the coming of Grant. (search)
ack him while crossing. General Meade did not approve of the suggestion and the retreat continued. On the 14th Warren was attacked at Bristoe Station and won a brilliant victory. The Confederate troops engaged at Bristoe were the divisions of Heth and Anderson of A. P. Hill's corps. On the Union side the action was sustained by the divisions of Hays and Webb. The main attack was made by Heth's division and fell upon the first and third brigades of Webb's division and the third brigade of Heth's division and fell upon the first and third brigades of Webb's division and the third brigade of Hays's. Colonel James E. Mallon, commanding a brigade under Webb, was among the killed. The following order shows the importance of the action: headquarters, Army of the Potomac, Oct. 15, 1863. The Major-General commanding announces to the army that the rear-guard, consisting of the Second Corps, was attacked yesterday while marching by the flank. The enemy, after a spirited contest, was repulsed, losing a battery of five guns, two colors, and 450 prisoners. The skill and promptit
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4., From the Wilderness to Cold Harbor. (search)
d Spotsylvania. The fight began between Getty's division of the Sixth Corps and Heth's division, which was leading A. P. Hill's column. Hancock's corps, which was as ordered to drive Hill out of the Wilderness. Cadmus Wilcox's division went to Heth's support, and Poague's battalion of artillery took position in a little clearinoops and preparations for battle could be heard on the Federal line, in front of Heth's and Wilcox's divisions, which had so far sustained themselves against every attack by six divisions under General Hancock. But Heth's and Wilcox's men were thoroughly worn out. Their lines were ragged and irregular, with wide intervals, and ind. Law's (Alabama) and Perry's (Florida) brigades were being forced back, when, Heth's division coming to their assistance, they assumed the offensive, driving Burnso Louisa Court House. General Early was ordered from the right with Mahone's and Heth's divisions, and, moving rapidly to the threatened quarter, attacked Hancock's r
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