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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Report of General S. McGowan of battles of the Wilderness and Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
-General Wilcox, my brigade left their winter quarters on the Rapidan and marched through Orange Courthouse, following General Heth's division down the Plank road towards Fredericksburg. That night we bivouacked near Vediersville. The next morning rt it. Whilst in this position a heavy fire of musketry was opened on our right at the Plank road upon the division of General Heth. An officer of Lieutenant-General Hill's staff in a few minutes galloped up, and in the absence of General Wilcox (whx. As I approached the point of fire, I met General Lee, who directed me to proceed down the Plank road and report to General Heth, who was conducting the fight. I did so, and was directed by him to deploy my brigade on both sides of the Plank roadnel Brown) on the extreme left. In this order we pressed through the dense undergrowth, and, passing over the line of General Heth, which was lying down, charged the enemy and drove him some distance--four or five hundred yards--the whole extent of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Wilderness. (search)
-General Wilcox, my brigade left their winter quarters on the Rapidan and marched through Orange Courthouse, following General Heth's division down the Plank road towards Fredericksburg. That night we bivouacked near Vediersville. The next morning rt it. Whilst in this position a heavy fire of musketry was opened on our right at the Plank road upon the division of General Heth. An officer of Lieutenant-General Hill's staff in a few minutes galloped up, and in the absence of General Wilcox (whx. As I approached the point of fire, I met General Lee, who directed me to proceed down the Plank road and report to General Heth, who was conducting the fight. I did so, and was directed by him to deploy my brigade on both sides of the Plank roadnel Brown) on the extreme left. In this order we pressed through the dense undergrowth, and, passing over the line of General Heth, which was lying down, charged the enemy and drove him some distance--four or five hundred yards--the whole extent of
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Gettysburg campaign--official reports. (search)
casualties in my division during the operations around Gettysburg were-- Killed,219 Wounded,1,229 Missing,375   Total,1,823 I am, Major, with great respect, your obedient servant, Edward Johnson, Major-General. Report of Major-General H. Heth. headquarters Heth's division, Camp near Orange Courthouse, September 13, 1863. Captain — I have the honor to report the operations of my division from the 29th June until the 1st of July, including the part it took in the battle this occasion to mention the energy displayed by my Chief Quartermaster, Major A. W. Vick, and his assistants, in collecting transportation for the division when in Pennsylvania, the division having a limited supply when it crossed the Potomac; also to Major Hungerford, Chief Commissary of Subsistence, and his assistants for their activity in procuring supplies. I am, very respectfully, your obedient servant, H. Heth, Major-General. Captain W. N. Starke, A. A.-General Third Corps, A. N. V
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of the Virginia division, A. N. V. (search)
mously and enthusiastically voted to request Colonel Allan to furnish a copy of his address for publication in the Southern Historical Society Papers, and in pamphlet form; and the thanks of the Association were tendered him for his vivid, accurate and exceedingly valuable recital of that chapter of our history. On motion of Colonel Charles S. Venable, the following old officers were unanimously re-elected: General W. H. F. Lee, President; General Robert Ransom, First Vice-President; General H. Heth, Second Vice-President; General A. L. Long, Third Vice-President; General William Terry, Fourth Vice-President; Captain D. P. McCorkle, Fifth Vice-President; Major Robert Stiles, Treasurer; Sergeants George L. Christian and Leroy S. Edwards, Secretaries. Executive Committee: General Bradley T. Johnson, Colonel Thomas H. Carter, Major W. K. Martin, Major T. A. Brander, Private C. McCarthy. On motion of General B. T. Johnson, seconded by General W. B. Taliaferro, and endorsed by a numb
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Boydton plank road, battle of. (search)
of the Weldon Railway. The movement began on the morning of Oct. 27, 1864, and at nine o'clock the Confederate line was struck, but it was not broken. Warren's corps made its way to the west of hatcher's Run to gain the Confederate rear. Crawford's division got entangled and broken in an almost impassable swamp. An attempt of a part of Howard's corps to form a junction with Crawford's troops was defeated by the tangled swamp. These movements had been eagerly watched by the Confederates. Heth was sent by Hill to strike Hancock. It was done at 4 P. M. The blow first fell upon Pierce's brigade, and it gave way, leaving two guns behind. The Confederates were pursuing, when they, in turn, were struck by the Nationals, driven back, and the two guns recaptured. Fully 1,000 Confederates were made prisoners. Others, in their flight, rushed into Crawford's lines, and 200 of them were made prisoners. Meanwhile Hancock had been sorely pressed on his left and rear by five brigades under
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Everett, Edward, 1794-1865 (search)
hed so great a sacrifice. On the Union side there fell, in the whole campaign, of generals killed, Reynolds, Weed, and Zook, and wounded, Barlow, Barnes, Butterfield, Doubleday, Gibbon, Graham, Hancock, Sickles, and Warren; while of officers below the rank of general, and men, there were 2,834 killed, 13,709 wounded, and 6,643 missing. On the Confederate side there were killed on the field, or mortally wounded, Generals Armistead, Barksdale, Garnett, Pender, Petigru, and Semmes, and wounded, Heth, Hood, Johnson, Kemper, Kimball, and Trimble. Of officers below the rank of general, and men, there were taken prisoners, including the wounded, 13,621, a number ascertained officially. Of the wounded in a condition to be removed, of the killed, and of the missing, the enemy has made no return. They were estimated, from the best data which the nature of the case admits, at 23,000. General Meade also captured three cannon and forty-one standards, and 24,978 small-arms were collected on the
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Gettysburg, battle of. (search)
give battle at once. On the day before, Kilpatrick and Custer's cavalry had defeated some of Stuart's a few miles from Gettysburg. Buford's cavalry entered Gettysburg; and on the 30th the left wing of Meade's army, led by General Reynolds, arrived near there. At the same time the corps of Hill and Longstreet were approaching from Chambersburg, and Ewell was marching down from Carlisle in full force. On the morning of July 1 Buford, with 6,000 cavalry, met the van of Lee's army, led by General Heth, between Seminary Ridge (a little way from Gettysburg) and a parallel ridge a little farther west, when a sharp skirmish ensued. Reynolds, who had bivouacked at Position of the Northern and Confederate armies, sunset, June 30, 1863. Marsh Creek, a few miles distant, was then advancing with his own corps, followed by Howard's, having those of Sickles and Slocum within call. The sound of fire-arms quickened his pace, and he marched rapidly to the relief of Buford, who was holding the C
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Heth, Henry 1825-1899 (search)
Heth, Henry 1825-1899 Military officer; born in Black Heath, Va., Dec. 16, 1825; graduated at West Point in 1847; left the service and joined the Confederates in April, 1861, and entered the service of Virginia as brigadier-general. He was made a Confederate major-general in May, 1863, and commanded a division of A. P. Hill's corps in Virginia. He fought at Gettysburg, and in the campaign in defence of Richmond (1864-65), and surrendered with Lee. He died in Washington, D. C., Sept. 27, 1899.
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Ream's Station, battle of. (search)
roceeded to strike the Weldon road, Hancock, who had been called from the north side of the James, followed close in his rear, and on Aug. 21 struck the railway north of Ream's station and destroyed the track for several miles. He formed an intrenched camp at Ream's, and his cavalry kept up a vigilant scout in the direction of the Confederate army. On the 25th Hancock was struck by Hill. The latter was repulsed. Hill struck again, and was again repulsed with heavy loss. Hill then ordered Heth to carry the National works at all hazards, upon which a concentrated fire of artillery was opened. This was followed by a desperate charge, which broke the National line. Three National batteries were captured. A fierce struggle for the possession of the works and guns ensued. In this the Nationals were partly successful. The Nationals were finally defeated, and withdrew. Hancock lost 2,400 of his 8,000 men and five guns. Of the men, 1,700 were made prisoners. Hill's loss was not muc
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade), chapter 5 (search)
rsburg. General Hill, at Chambersburg, moved Heth's division, on the 29th, to Cashtown, followed ll was at Cashtown; his advance, consisting of Heth's and Pender's divisions, toward Gettysburg; hiosed along the line. The advance of the enemy, Heth's division of A. P. Hill's corps, a heavy columst gun, which opened the battle of Gettysburg. Heth then deployed his two leading brigades, Archer n brought into action until late in the day. Heth, bringing up the brigades of Pettigrew and Brocow to the First Corps, on the left of the line: Heth, on receiving the order from Hill to attack, adl cover close to the seminary. In this advance Heth himself was wounded. On the right of the Firosition against the most vigorous attacks, from Heth in front and from Rodes on the right. Robinson time of day was half-past 3 in the afternoon. Heth's division, now out of ammunition, and thoroughseminary, Anderson's division on the right, and Heth's division, now under command of Pettigrew, hel[4 more...]
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