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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Confederate negro enlistments. (search)
nthly, etc.-will find them teeming with historical instances written up of slaves who had so risen. The Atlantic, in particular, in urging the Emancipation Proclamation, took occasion to give, as arguments for it, detailed accounts of the revolt of Spartacus, of the Maroons, of Nat. Turner's outbreak, etc.; all showing the wish that was father to the thought. Butler speculated in this sort of business at Fortress Monroe and New Orleans, and Hunter tried it in South Carolina and Florida. Higginson's regiment at Beaufort was intended to be a nucleus for the negro rising which was looked for on the Carolina coast. The negroes, however, refused to disturb the Confederates with any fire in the rear. They behaved in the most exemplary manner everywhere. Where the Federal armies settled down they came in in large numbers, and established their camps upon the fringes of the army, playing the parts of intelligent contrabands to perfection. They told miraculous stories, and brought in
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
Gillmore proceeded to distract the attention of the Confederates, and mask his real design, by sending July 8. General A. H. Terry, with nearly four thousand troops, up the Stono River, to make a demonstration against James's Island, while Colonel Higginson, with some negro troops, went up the Edisto to cut the Charleston and Savannah railway, so as to prevent troops from being sent from the latter to the former place. Higgins went in the gun-boat John Adams, with two transports, but in his arfully shattered and unable to continue the contest, fell back under Major Plympton, of the Third New Hampshire. Very few of the colored troops, whose bravery and fortitude had been well tested, remained unhurt, and these were led away by Lieutenant Higginson, a mere lad, into the Fort Wagner at the Point of assault. this shows the land-front of the Fort, with the sally-port, near which Colonel Shaw was killed. sheltering gloom. On the repulse of the first brigade of assailants, the se
t us as we are, and not as they suppose us to be. On the other hand, from some quarters in America come reproaches to us for not speaking about America enough, for not making sufficient use of her in illustration of what we bring forward. Mr. Higginson expresses much surprise that when, for instance, I dilate on the benefits of equality, it is to France that I have recourse for the illustration and confirmation of my thesis, not to the United States. A Boston newspaper supposes me to speak find the difficulty solved in America, to find democracy a success there, with a type of equality producing such good results, that, when one preaches equality, one should illustrate its advantages not from the example of the French, but, as Mr. Higginson recommends, from the example of the people of the United States. I go back again to my Boston newspaper:-- In towns whose names Mr. Arnold never heard, and never will hear, there will be found almost invariably a group of people of good t
Matthew Arnold, Civilization in the United States: First and Last Impressions of America., IV: civilization in the United States. (search)
Roe, instead of those of Scott and Dickens. Far from admitting that their average man is a danger, and that his predominance has brought about a plentiful lack of refinement, distinction, and beauty, they declare in the words of my friend Colonel Higginson, a prominent critic at Boston, that Nature said, some years since: Thus far the English is my best race, but we have had Englishmen enough; put in one drop more of nervous fluid and make the American. And with that drop a new range of prohis people, who endure to have the American newspaper for their daily reading, and to have their habitation in Briggsville, Jacksonville, and Marcellus — this people is of finer, more delicate nervous organization than other nations! It is Colonel Higginson's drop more of nervous fluid, over again. This drop plays a stupendous part in the American rhapsody of self-praise. Undoubtedly the Americans are highly nervous, both the men and the women. A great Paris physician says that he notes a d
utters, under the commands of Lieutenant Russell, Sproston, Blake, and Midshipman Steece, respectively, assisted by Captain Reynolds, of the marines, Assistant-Surgeon Kennedy, Assistant-Engineer White, Gunner Horton, and Midshipmen Forrest and Higginson. The whole force detailed consisted of about one hundred men, officers, sailors, and marines. The object of the expedition was the destruction of a schooner which lay off the Pensacola Navy Yard, supposed to be fitting out as a privateer, andtake, having lost his distinguishing mark, killed by one of our own men. We have wounded, probably mortally, seaman R. Clark and E. K. Osborne; severely, nine other seamen. Captain Reynolds received a severe contusion on his shoulder, and midshipman Higginson had the end of his thumb shot off. Lieutenants Russell and Blake had narrow escapes, the flesh of each being grazed by one or more musket balls. It is not an easy task to select individual instances of bravery or daring where all behave
lly, your obedient servant, T. Bailey, Captain Commanding Division of the Red. To Flag-Officer D. G. Farragut, Commander-in-Chief, etc. General report of Captain Bailey. United States gunboat Cayuga, at sea, May 7, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy: sir: Having found it impossible to get the Colorado over the bars of the Mississippi, I sent up a large portion of her guns and crew, filling up deficiencies of both in the different vessels, and with my aid, Acting Midshipman Higginson, steward and boat's crew, followed up myself, hoisting, by authority of the flag-officer, my Red, distinguishing flag as second in command, first on the Oneida, Com. Lee, and afterward on the Cayuga. That brave, resolute and indefatigable officer, Com. D. D. Porter, was at work with his mortar-fleet, throwing shells at and into Fort Jackson, while Gen. Butler, with a division of his army, in transports, was waiting a favorable moment to land. After the mortar-fleet had been
ia regiment, together with one company of the Eighth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Doyle, and one company of the Seventy-ninth Highlanders, left Beaufort, arriving at Port Royal Ferry, and crossing over to the main land at day-light. Thence the line of march for Pocatallgo, via Garden's Corners, was instantly taken up, Col. Christ driving in the enemy's pickets three times before the latter point was reached. At Garden's Corners company E, under the command of Lieut. Lantz, was left, and Major Higginson, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, came up with a force of eighty men and horses. After a brief halt at this point, we again started for Pocotaligo, via the Sheldon road, and with the exception of occasionally driving in the enemy's pickets, which delayed our march to a considerable degree, we reached our destination without interruption. Here we were met by the enemy, about eight hundred strong, his force consisting, as near as we could judge, of six companies of mounted riflemen
ia regiment, together with one company of the Eighth Michigan volunteers, Capt. Doyle, and one company of the Seventy-ninth Highlanders, left Beaufort, arriving at Port Royal Ferry, and crossing over to the main land at day-light. Thence the line of march for Pocatallgo, via Garden's Corners, was instantly taken up, Col. Christ driving in the enemy's pickets three times before the latter point was reached. At Garden's Corners company E, under the command of Lieut. Lantz, was left, and Major Higginson, of the First Massachusetts cavalry, came up with a force of eighty men and horses. After a brief halt at this point, we again started for Pocotaligo, via the Sheldon road, and with the exception of occasionally driving in the enemy's pickets, which delayed our march to a considerable degree, we reached our destination without interruption. Here we were met by the enemy, about eight hundred strong, his force consisting, as near as we could judge, of six companies of mounted riflemen
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Chapter 3: community life (search)
ny well-brought — up young fellow might produce. The mannerisms of the sturdy English reviewing of the day sat heavily upon him, and he was constantly dismissing the victims of his disapproval with the familiar conge of the British quarterlies. Short poems and literary notices formed the major part of his work, but it is unnecessary to particularize the amount or quality of what he did. It was all excellent practice. Poe, Cooper, and Anthon were his youthful hatreds. According to Colonel Higginson, the Professor was the best all-round man at Brook Farm, but was held not to be quite so zealous or unselfish for the faith as were some of the others, though his speeches in Boston and elsewhere were most effective. Dana was at that time a very young man, with the faults, but with all the splendor and promise, of youth. No one has criticized the fidelity of his work at the school, and no one, not excepting Ripley, spoke more fervidly than Dana in the cause of association. He was w
John Harrison Wilson, The life of Charles Henry Dana, Index (search)
rper's Ferry, 347, 348. Harrison, President, 472, 475, 478. Harvard College, 20, 25, 33, 500. Hawaiian Islands, 472. Hawe's Shop, 321. Hawthorne, Nathaniel, 37, 45, 454. Hayes, General, 442-445, 447, 456, 457, 462. Hazen, General, 264, 284. Hecker, Colonel, 296. Hedge, Professor, 35. Heine, 56. Helena, Arkansas, 207. Hendricks, 442, 443. Hepburn, W. P., 473. Herald, New York, 128, 129, 232, 440, 484-489. Herder, 453. Herman, poet, 56. Hildreth, 143, 153. Higginson, Colonel, 47. Hive, The, 44. Hoar, E. Rockwood, 410, 412, 418, 419. Holman, the Great Objector, 459. Holt, 182. Hood, General, 343, 346, 349, 350, 351, 355, 356. Hooker, General, 268, 275, 278, 283, 284-286, 291. Hooper, 354. Horace, quotation from, 56. Hosmer, Rev. Mr., 18. Household Book of Poetry, 54, 157, 158, 174, 175, 177, 288, 289, 501, 503. Hovey, General, 223, 246. Howard, General, 278, 285, 291, 292. Hudson, Frederick, 128, 486. Hudson, Lieutenant-Colonel
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