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William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 5: sources of the Tribune's influence — Greeley's personality (search)
mes in 1852 to supply a journal of political views similar to those advocated by the Tribune without the Tribune's vagaries, the new enterprise succeeded, but it made no serious inroads on the circulation of the older one. Greeley complained that the Times's circulation exceeded that of the Tribune in New York city. Greeley came to be a sort of general counsel for many people, some of whom could undoubtedly be classified among that fringe of the unreasonable and half-cracked, with whom, Higginson says, it is the tendency of every reform to surround itself. Before the Tribune was a year old its editor told his readers, We have a number of requests to blow up all sorts of abuses, and he added, with that selfconfi-dence which always characterized him, which shall be attended to as fast as possible. Greeley thoroughly enjoyed his reputation as a philosopher and a seer, and a glance through his columns will show how little he was hindered by modesty in giving advice, those receiving
William Alexander Linn, Horace Greeley Founder and Editor of The New York Tribune, Chapter 7: Greeley's part in the antislavery contest (search)
asion of mob violence, in which Lewis Tappen's house was gutted, and other buildings, including churches, were damaged, and unoffending negroes were assaulted in the streets; these disorders continued for several days, and extended into New Jersey. The public animosity shown to the Abolitionists in the North was quite as determined against any attempt to better the condition of negroes. The Jim Crow cars of the Southern States to-day were common on Massachusetts railroads in 1840, and Higginson remembers when a colored woman was put out of an omnibus near Cambridge Common. When, in 1831, it was proposed by the free people of color to establish a school on the manual labor plan, and New Haven, Conn., was selected as its site, a meeting of citizens there resolved to resist it by every lawful means. Because of the admission of colored students to Noyes's Academy, at Canaan, N. H., in 1835, three hundred men and one hundred yokes of oxen moved the building from its foundation. Whe