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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), How General A. P. Hill met his fate. (search)
is due, also, to a distinguished officer of General Hill's staff for revision of the account of the ell-known as in the case of the shooting of General Hill. Of the four men who accidentally met on tefences, and started most of Heth's division of Hill's corps in a rapid retreat in a northwesterly dled to halt and fight a battle. Lieutenant-General A. P. Hill passed the night at his headquarte had entered the Confederate lines. When General Hill came to the lost ground in front of Wilcox'heir independent exploring expedition, when General Hill and his sergeant of courier, George W. TuckThe enemy's. Proceeding still further, and General Hill making no further remark, I became so impreto hell. Our men are here—surrender! Then General Hill was at my side, calling, Surrender. Now, wr, when Mauk with steadier aim brought down General Hill, is still living. He belongs to the class xpected, and almost as tragic as that of General A. P. Hill. The Sixth corps had made a long march [14 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.6 (search)
rly part of the same morning, we (Longstreet and Hood) were both engaged, in company with Generals A. P. Hill and Lee, in observing the position of the Federals. * * * General Lee was seemingly anxionoted further that Hood's phrase concerning the time of the conversation held by Lee, Longstreet, Hill and Hood is this: During the early part of the same morning; presumably before the arrival of Hoo 68, 69.) Further light is thrown upon the matter by the reports of Wilcox. and Anderson, of Hill's corps. It was part of Lee's plan that this corps should occupy the Confederate centre on July 2d, and that Longstreet should bring his divisions upon the field immediately to the right of Hill. Anderson's division, however, was a mile and a half west of Gettysburg on the morning of July 2d (Od discretion, together with the improvident use of the same prerogative on the part of Stuart, A. P. Hill and Ewell, combined together to inscribe Gettysburg in the annals of the Southern Confederacy
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Purcell battery from Richmond, Va. [from the Galveston, Texas, news, November, 1899.] (search)
m Malvern Hill to Richmond to refit and recruit. After several weeks' rest, we were attached to Jackson's flying column, and sent to meet the army of the Potomac, commanded by General John Pope, who, the Northern press declared, would prove more than a match for Stonewall Jackson, and had been sent to Virginia to teach him (Jackson) the art of war. Arriving at Orange Courthouse about August 8th, we took a short rest, and on the afternoon of the 9th crossed the Rapidan at Morton's Ford. A. P. Hill's division, to which we were attached, was marching in columns through a wooded country, over a very rough road. Our battery was about the centre of the column. As soon as the head of our troops emerged from the woods into the open fields of Culpeper, they were attacked by Banks's corps. After a short but desperate conflict, Banks fell back, and the fighting ceased. We had been posted in the woods, and did not see or participate in the fighting, at which our boy captain—little Willie
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Oration and tender of the monument. (search)
sparkle with lustre, on which will be written the names of the military chieftains of the South, the name of Robert E. Lee, whose noble virtues and martial deeds gave glory and renown world-wide to his beloved country; of Jackson—Stonewall Jackson— Whose eye met the battle As the eagle's meets the sun— that military genius whose fall on the bloody field of Chancellorsville made freedom shriek; of Smith and Polk, the Christian soldiers; of Albert S. and Joseph E. Johnston; of D. H. and A. P. Hill; of Cleburne and Stuart and Morgan and Bragg and Hardee, and a host of others, who in life labored and fought for the South, and who are at rest now, we trust, on the shining shore of the other side. But no pages of that history will be brighter and more resplendent than those which shall record the marvelous deeds and terrible trials of the women of the South. Those pages will tell of wives and mothers and daughters and sisters who, in their wonderful courage and in their true and con<
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.23 (search)
found out that he did not have any rear, but he would have given anything if he could have gotten there. Marched to Orange. On August 7th we left Liberty Mills and marched to Orange Courthouse. We were joined on the morning of the 8th by A. P. Hill's division and Stafford's brigade, and Jackson's force now consists of Jackson's, Ewell's and A. P. Hill's division and Stafford's brigade. We marched early towards the Rapid Ann. The advance meeting with slight resistance at Barnett's Ford, jA. P. Hill's division and Stafford's brigade. We marched early towards the Rapid Ann. The advance meeting with slight resistance at Barnett's Ford, just before we got to this ford we passed a Quaker Cannon that the advance had rigged up, it was the hind part of a wagon with a black log fixed on it, the men ran this out on a hill in full sight of the Yanks at the ford, made the advance with a cheer and the enemy retreated, they could not stand the sight of the cannon. I saw at this ford soon after crossing, the first man who claimed to be wounded by a sabre, his ear was badly cut. We take the direct road for Culpeper Courthouse and ford R
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
m this place to Walnut Grove church, something over one mile from the Mill. There we halted and rested for an hour or two. It was at this place that we first saw Stonewall Jackson. He passed us as we rested by the roadside, and his troops and Hill's Light division were now united. After a delay of some time, Jackson's command moved out along a road bearing to the left, while Hill's Light division followed the road leading direct to Gaines's Mill, some three miles distant. Between WalnutHill's Light division followed the road leading direct to Gaines's Mill, some three miles distant. Between Walnut Grove church and Gaines's Mill in an open field the pontoon bridges of the enemy were abandoned and fired. Their retreat was so rapid that they did not attempt to save army supplies but applied the torch to everything that they could burn, and hurried on to their next line of defence. About 12 o'clock we reached Gaines's Mill without any opposition. Our skirmishers encountered the rear guard of the enemy at the Mill, and soon drove them off, without much loss on our side. After our skirmish
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
et seq.) He never told any one that he accepted Jesus as the Christ, or performed one of the acts which necessarily followed upon such a conviction. (Page 487.) When he went to church at all, he went to mock, and came away to mimic. On page 157 and thereafter, Lamon tells minutely of the writing and the burning of a little book, written by Lincoln with the purpose to disprove the truth of the Bible and the divinity of Christ, and he tells how it was burned without his consent by his friend, Hill, lest it should ruin his political career before a Christian people. On pages 487 to 504 he records numerous letters from Lincoln's intimate associates, and one from his wife, that fully confirmed the above testimony as to his attitude of hostility to religion. Herndon's True Story of a Great Life (dated 1888), sets forth on the title page that Lincoln was for twenty years his friend and law partner, and says (preface, page 10): Mr. Lincoln was my warm, devoted friend; I always loved him,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gettysburg. (search)
ow rest.] At Gettysburg the Florida brigade, participating in the desperate charges of the Confederate centre, under A. P. Hill, on the 2d and 3d of July, sustained fearful losses in killed and wounded, being proportionately greater than that of a is, Longstreet on the right, and Ewell on the left, almost confronting each other, and forming nearly a right angle, with Hill in the centre; we received orders to conform our lines to Longstreet's movements and advance with him. About 4:30 P. M., Ln no humor for following up his advantage. On the 3d, General Longstreet bringing sixty pieces of artillery up, and General Hill having fifty more in position, about 3 P. M., they opened a most terrific fire upon the enemy's strong-hold, with the number engaged, exceeds that sustained by any other brigade on the field. The brigade belongs to Anderson's division, Hill's corps; Wilcox held the right of the division, Mahone the left, Wright the centre, Perry (Colonel Lang in command), the r
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Colonel John Bowie Magruder. (search)
mattox, and was put under the command of General A. P. Hill until the 11th of July. Captain Magruder. A. G. to General A. P. Hill, and asked if General Hill had ever made a report of the engagement atardstown; how many men were there, and what General Hill's opinion of the fight had been. It seems d, as the whole honor and glory belonged to General Hill. The battle of Sharpsburg is claimed as to wait at the ford until General Gregg (of A. P. Hill's division) crossed and to report to him (GeGeneral A. P. Hill's light division being the rear guard of the army). All night long I sat on my hg the only sounds, but plainly showing that General Hill did not intend to allow General McClellan tthe road and thence into the river, the fire of Hill's infantry became steadier and their aim truer,olumes of the War of the Rebellion how many men Hill had and how many Federal troops there were, my the river as we withdrew. This action of General Hill's proved to be one of the turning points in[10 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.35 (search)
ion, now commanded by Early, was in camp next to D. H. Hill's division, while the divisions of A. P. Hill and Taliaferro were placed near the railroad leading from Richmond, where they could move eith might demand. Jackson established himself near Guiney's Station, on a road which led both to A. P. Hill's headquarters and to the headquarters of General R. E. Lee—the latter being established on thg movement with Franklin's Corps, to find Jackson in position at Hamilton's Crossing, and that A. P. Hill's 10,000 veterans were drawn up in double line, with fourteen pieces of field artillery on his thirty-three on his left; while Early's and Taliaferro's divisions were in order of battle in A. P. Hill's rear and D. H. Hill's division was in reserve. Stuart's cavalry were in advance of Jackson' assault to break through Lee's right, and gain one of the two highways that led to Richmond. A. P. Hill's first line of battle was broken, but Jackson, promptly informed of this assault, rode headlo
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