hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Col. J. Stoddard Johnston, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.1, Kentucky (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 20 4 Browse Search
Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States. 11 1 Browse Search
Colonel Charles E. Hooker, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 12.2, Mississippi (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 3. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 4 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 2 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 84 results in 32 document sections:

1 2 3 4
t, formerly editor of the Louisville Courier, and Martin W. Barr, of the telegraph-office, were arrested; and these arrests were rapidly followed by others, of aged, wealthy, and eminent citizens, who were carried off to captivity in the free States. On the same day, September 19th, Colonel Bramlette, with his command, reached Lexington, to arrest Breckinridge, Preston, and other Southern-rights men. But these received timely intimation of their danger, and escaped. Humphrey Marshall, George B. Hodge, John S. Williams, Haldeman and McKee, of the Courier, and many other Southern sympathizers, warned by these events, or by secret friendly messages, also found their way to the Confederate lines. These fugitives resorted either to Richmond or to Bowling Green, according to the direction of their escape, or for other reasons. Breckinridge, after a short stay in Richmond, went to Bowling Green, where, on October 8th, he issued a noble and stirring address to the people of Kentucky.
s related in the siege of Fort Donelson. The next day's march brought them to Camp Trousdale, where they occupied the huts; but with little profit, as some atmospheric condition made the smoke in them intolerable. After a bad night from smoke and the bitter cold, they marched twenty-seven miles next day, and on the day after, the 16th, through Nashville, and five miles beyond. The Kentuckians retreated sullenly. Thompson's History of the first Kentucky brigade, pp. 16-81. General George B. Hodge, then Breckinridge's assistant adjutant-general, in an interesting account of that brigade, mentions that- The spirits of the army were cheered by the accounts which General Johnston, with thoughtful care, forwarded by means of couriers daily, of the successful resistance of the army. The entire army bivouacked in line of battle on the night of the 15th, at the junction of the Gallatin and Nashville and Bowling Green and Nashville [turnpike] roads, about ten miles from Nashvil
e Confederate army to intercept and give battle to Buell, in case he should advance by any of these three roads. The movement was covered by a cloud of cavalry, Helm's First Kentucky, Scott's Louisiana, Wirt Adams's Mississippi, and by Forrest's and Morgan's commands, who were bold and energetic in harassing the enemy. The incessant rains, varying from a drizzle to a torrent, flooded the roads, washed away bridges, and made encampment almost intolerable and marching nearly impossible. General Hodge, in his sketch, says of the road taken: Lying, for the most part, through cultivated and deep bottoms, on the edge of Northern Alabama it rises abruptly to cross the great plateau thrown out from the Cumberland Mountains, here nearly a thousand feet above the surrounding country and full forty miles in width, covered with dense forests of timber, yet barren and sterile in soil, and wholly destitute of supplies for either man or beast. Two weeks of unintermitting rain had softened
ipment, and drill, and from the rough and wooded character of the ground, they did little service that day. The part taken by Morgan's, Forrest's, and Wharton's (Eighth Texas), will be given in its proper place. The army, exclusive of its cavalry, was between 35,000 and 36,000 strong. Jordan, in an official report, made in July, 1862, to the writer, then on inspection-duty, gave the effective total of all arms at 38,773, who marched April 3d. In his Life of Forrest he makes it 39,630. Hodge, in his sketch of the First Kentucky Brigade, with a different distribution of troops, puts the total at 39,695, which he says he made up from the returns at the time. Beauregard's report of the battle gives the field return at 40,335, of which 4,382 was cavalry. This last return includes Colonel Hill's Forty-seventh Tennessee Regiment, which came up on the 7th. There are apparently some errors in the return of July, 1862. The writer believes that the figures in Jordan's Life of Forrest
ten good and gallant troops recoiled from positions which they could not take. The measure of resistance is an element of the greatest importance, too often ignored, in estimating the value and courage of an attack. Major (afterward General) Hodge, who was Breckinridge's adjutant general, and on the spot, gives the following clear description of the attack: The long slope of the ridge was here abruptly broken by a succession of small hills or undulations of about fifty feet in heightvoice and manly bearing, was appealing to the soldiers, aided by his son Cabell and a very gallant staff. It was a goodly company; and, in the charge, Breckinridge, leading and towering above them all, was the only one who escaped unscathed. Major Hodge and Cabell Breckinridge had their horses shot under them; Major Hawkins was wounded in the face, and Captain Allen had his leg torn by a shell. Many eye-witnesses have remarked to the writer on the beautiful composure and serene fidelity wit
and, in fact, all the paraphernalia of war ready to fit them for immediate service in the field. Of the officers, many are specially qualified for their positions. Col. Barnes is distinguished for having been in the same class with Jeff. Davis, at West Point, graduating A one, when Jeff. was No. twenty-seven, in a class of thirty-one. Lieut.-Col. Ingraham was in the Massachusetts Fourth, stationed at Fortress Monroe. Major Hayes is a graduate of Harvard College, and quite popular. Adjutant Hodge was an officer of the Massachusetts Fifth, and distinguished himself at Bull Run, saving the life of Col. Lawrence. Surgeon Smith was educated in Paris, and was connected with Major Cobb's battery. Other officers of the regiment have seen active service. Most of the men are farmers and mechanics, of moderate means, excellent health, and unwavering devotion to the cause of the Union.--N. Y. Times, August 28. A correspondent of the Philadelphia Inquirer gives an extended account of
14. The excitement in England relative to the boarding of the Trent continues: The Liverpool Mercury of this day, states that the Earl of Derby had been consulted by the Government. He approved of its policy in reference to the American difficulty, and suggested to ship-owners to instruct the captains of outward bound ships to signalize any English vessels, that war with America was probable. This suggestion had been strongly approved by the underwriters. The Legislative Council of Kentucky, at its session this day, elected the following gentlemen as delegates from Kentucky to the Provisional Congress of the Confederate States: Henry C. Burnett; John Thomas; Geo. W. Ewing; Dr. D. V. White; T. L. Burnett; Jno. M. Elliott; S. H. Ford; Thos. B. Monroe; Thos. Johnson; Geo. B. Hodge.--Louisville-Nashville Courier, Dec. 16. The Green Mountain Cavalry, Vermont Volunteers, under the command of Colonel Lemuel B. Platt, left the encampment at Burlington for the seat of war.
, who passed the pickets a quarter of a mile and returned, reporting the rebels in force. Major Patterson drew up his command, four hundred and four in all, and fifty convalescents from the hospital. Skirmishing followed for an hour and a quarter, during which the rebels were repulsed in three charges. Wheeler then sent in a flag of truce, with a verbal demand for a surrender, which Major Patterson refused, saying he would not surrender until he was compelled to do so. In half an hour Colonel Hodge of the Kentucky brigade brought a demand for surrender in writing. Major Patterson, after consulting with his officers, deeming it useless to contend against an enemy so greatly superior in numbers, surrendered. Wheeler had four divisions of cavalry, artillery, and ten brigades, and said he had ten thousand men. The Union loss was seven killed and thirty-one wounded and missing. The rebels admitted a loss of twenty-three killed and wounded. After the surrender Major Patterson's trunk
April 6. Brigadier-General Guitar, from his headquarters at Macon, Missouri, issued general orders relinquishing his command of the district of North-Missouri, to Brigadier-General C. B. Fisk. Reuben Patrick, captain of a company of secret service employed by order of Governor Bramlette, by Colonel G. W. Gallup, commanding the district of Eastern Kentucky, with fifteen men of company I, Fourteenth Kentucky, and four of his own company, surprised Captain Bradshaw, with eighty men of Hodge's brigade, on Quicksand Creek. He drove them in all directions, they leaving all their horses, arms, and camp equipage in Patrick's possession, who selected thirty of the best horses, and, with three prisoners, made quick time for camp, where he arrived, having left ten dead rebels, and seven mortally wounded on the ground. The captured arms were destroyed by burning them. This is the same Patrick who stole Humphrey Marshall's artillery out of his camp at Shelbyville, last spring. An
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
n, of Scott County, was chosen Governor. The ministers of the Legislative Council were: William B. Machin, John W. Crockett, James P. Bates, James S. Critman, Philander R. Thompson, J. P. Burnside, H. W. Bruce, J. W. Moore, E. M. Bruce, and George B. Hodge. Bowling Green was selected as the new capital of the State. Commissioners were appointed to treat with the Confederate Government, for the admission of Kentucky into the league; The Commissioners were: Henry C. Burnett, W. E. Simons, angislative council Dec. 16, 1861. to seats in the Congress at Richmond. These were: Henry C. Burnett, John Thomas, Thomas L. Burnett, S. H. Ford, Thomas B. Johnson, George W. Ewing. Dr. D. V. White, John M. Elliott, Thomas B. Monroe, and George B. Hodge. On the day when these men were chosen by the Council, two of them — Henry C. Burnett and Thomas Monroe — were sworn in at Richmond as members of the Confederate Senate. Of such usurpers of the political rights of the people, the Confedera
1 2 3 4