Your search returned 33 results in 11 document sections:

1 2
e of the opportunity which this visit to Annapolis gave me to make a hasty inspection of Camp Parole, and I am happy to report that I found it in every branch in a most commendable condition. The men all seemed to be cheerful and in fine health, and the police inside and out was excellent. Colonel Root, the commanding officer, deserves much credit for the very satisfactory condition to which he has brought his command. I have the honor to be, very respectfully, your obedient servant, W. Hoffman, Colonel Third Infantry, Commissary General of Prisoners. Hon. E. M. Stanton, Secretary of War, Washington, D. C. Testimony. Annapolis, Maryland, May 6, 1864. Howard Leedom, sworn and examined: by the Chairman: Question. To what company and regiment have you belonged? Answer. Company G, Fifty-second New-York. Question. How long have you been in the service? Answer. About seven months. Question. What is your age? Answer. Seventeen. Question. When and where we
r examination for competency, as soon as he joins the corps. He is at present (I am unofficially informed) at a camp of paroled or exchanged prisoners, somewhere in this Department. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant, E. O. C. Ord, Major-General Vols., Commanding Thirteenth Army Corps. Official Copy. C. A. Nichols, Assistant Adjutant-General. General Washburn's report. headquarters detachment Thirteenth army corps, Vermillion bridge, November 7, 1863. Major William Hoffman, Assistant Adjutant-General: Major: I inclose herewith report of Brigadier-General Burbridge, in regard to the battle of Grand Coteau, on the third instant. Also of Lieutenant-Colonel Robinson, commanding Seconds Louisiana cavalry, and statements of Captain Simms, Sixty-seventh Indiana, and Lieutenant Gorman, Second Louisiana cavalry, who were wounded and taken prisoners, but who were supposed to be privates, and were delivered over, under a flag of truce, with other wounded. On
ccommodations at Richmond led to the transfer of the private soldiers to an enclosure on Belle Isle in the James River. For the purpose of better administration, the government at Washington, in October, 1861, appointed LieutenantCol-onel William Hoffman, one of the officers who had been surrendered in Texas, commissary-general of prisoners. Colonel Hoffman, for he was soon promoted, served to the end of the war, though for a few months he was transferred west of the Distant view of BellColonel Hoffman, for he was soon promoted, served to the end of the war, though for a few months he was transferred west of the Distant view of Belle Plain Camp of Confederate prisoners, May, 1864 This photograph was taken just after the Spotsylvania campaign, in the course of which Grant lost thirty-six thousand men in casualties but captured several thousand Confederates, part of whom appear crowding this prison camp. A tiny tortuous stream runs through the cleft in the hills. Near the center of the picture a small bridge spanning it can be descried. Farther to the right is a group of Union soldiers. The scene is on the line of co
Northern and Southern prisons Holland Thompson Brigadier-General William Hoffman, Federal commissary-general of prisoners. To him was due whatever of udiers had had, of course, large liberty. On the appointment of Lieutenant-Colonel William Hoffman, as commissary-general of prisoners, October 7, 1861, he was immethan the west end of Lake Erie, in order to avoid too rigorous a climate. Colonel Hoffman reported in favor of Johnson's Island, lying in Sandusky Bay, about two ann dreamed that as many as sixty thousand would be in durance at one time. Colonel Hoffman was expected to take charge of this prison. The first commandant was W. Sol of the governor of Indiana, but afterward came under the supervision of Colonel Hoffman, the commissary-general of prisoners. In 1863, Colonel A. A. Stevens of thowever, Quartermaster-General Meigs was much disappointed. When Lieutenant-Colonel William Hoffman, commissary-general of prisoners, had been ordered to Lake Erie i
65. Gibson, Geo., May 30, 1848. Gillem, Alvan G., April 12, 1865. Gilmore, Q. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Gordon, Mar. 13, 1865. Granger, Robt. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Grierson, B. H., Mar. 2, 1867. Griffin, Charles, Mar. 13, 1865. Grover, Cuvier, Mar. 13, 1865. Hardie, James A., Mar. 13, 1865. Harney, Wm. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Hartsuff, G. L., Mar. 13, 1865 Hatch, Edward, Mar. 2, 1867. Hawkins, J. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hazen, Wm. B., Mar. 13, 1865. Heintzelman, S. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Hoffman, Wm., Mar. 13, 1865. Holt, Joseph, Mar. 13, 1865. Hooker, Joseph, Mar. 13, 1865. Howard, O. O., Mar. 13, 1865. Howe, A. P., Mar. 13, 1865. Humphreys, A. A., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunt, Henry J., Mar. 13, 1865. Hunter, David, Mar. 13, 1865. Ingalls, Rufus, Mar. 13, 1865. Johnson, R. W., Mar. 13, 1865. Kautz, August V., Mar. 13, 1865. Ketchum, Wm. S., Mar. 13, 1865. Kilpatrick, Judson, Mar. 13, 1865. King, John H., Mar. 13, 1865. Long, Eli, Mar. 13, 1865. McCook, A. McD., Mar. 13, 1865.
teful acknowledgments for their kind and efficient help during these laborious battles; and they, with me, unfeignedly lament the fall of our comrade and brother, Captain George M. Graves. Many officers and men of my command, that it is impossible to refer to especially, are equally deserving with the best of soldiers. Patriots, Captain Adams, Eighty-fourth Illinois; Captain Tinker, Sixth Ohio; Captain Wadsworth, Twenty-fourth Ohio; Lieu-tenant Patterson, Thirty-sixth Indiana; Lieu-tenant Hoffman, Twenty-third Kentucky, with fifty-seven brave enlisted men, fell on these battle-fields a sacrifice upon their country's altar. My heart sickens to contemplate these irreparable losses. To the suffering wounded: may the God of battles soothe their afflictions, heal and restore them again to usefulness. The following table shows the casualties of the brigade, as near as is possible to ascertain at the present time: Loss and Casualties. Commander. command. killed. wounded. missi
easurer of Sons of Liberty, at his house, number six Washington street; also capturing at the same time in Walsh's house, about thirty rods from Camp Douglas, arms and ammunition, as per annexed schedule, numbered two. The shot guns were all loaded with cartridges, composed of from nine to twelve largest sized buckshot, and capped. The revolvers, (Joslyn's patent ten inch barrel,) also loaded and capped. Reported to Brigadier-General John Cook, commanding District of Illinois, and Colonel William Hoffman, Commissary-General of Prisoners ,by telegraphic despatch, dated Camp Douglas, November seven, at four o'clock A. M., a copy of which is hereto annexed, numbered three, made a part of this report. On the morning of Monday, the seventh inst., Colonel John L. Hancock, commanding militia, by order from Governor Yates, reported to me, and Colonel R. M. Hough rapidly organized a mounted force of about two hundred and fifty men, which was armed with the revolvers captured, (from Walsh
shed with Washington, under the efficient supervision of Colomel Markland, special agent of the Post Office Department. despatch Station, June 8. The First and Fourth divisions of the Fifth corps reached here this morning. It was three o'clock A. M. when the men began the march. When day dawned, the rebels on the south side of the Chickahominy observed the moving column, and opened on it with two guns of very heavy calibre. Several men were injured while marching in the ranks. Colonel Hoffman's brigade, of the Fourth division, immediately took possession of this side of the railroad bridge. A barricade was thrown across the railroad about half a mile below this station. Between us and the rebels flows the Chickahominy, a sinuous, sluggish stream, bounded on either side by jungles and morasses, from which is continually arising unwholesome dampness, and noxious vapors. At this point the stream is not more than one hundred yards in width; the bridge is three times as long.
despatch Station, June 8. The First and Fourth divisions of the Fifth corps reached here this morning. It was three o'clock A. M. when the men began the march. When day dawned, the rebels on the south side of the Chickahominy observed the moving column, and opened on it with two guns of very heavy calibre. Several men were injured while marching in the ranks. Colonel Hoffman's brigade, of the Fourth division, immediately took possession of this side of the railroad bridge. A barricade was thrown across the railroad about half a mile below this station. Between us and the rebels flows the Chickahominy, a sinuous, sluggish stream, bounded on either side by jungles and morasses, from which is continually arising unwholesome dampness, and noxious vapors. At this point the stream is not more than one hundred yards in width; the bridge is three times as long. All the track is in excellent running order. A little rusty from long disuse, but still quite complete, with switches
general example did find their way there during the night time. The enlisted men of my regiment fought as they always have, nobly and bravely. The officers, Captain Hoffman, Company B, Captain Flood, Company E, Captain Thistlewood, Company G, Captain Stanford, Company A, Captain Banta, Company I, Lieunant Spurgen, Company K, Lieutenant Junkins, Company B, Lieutenant Boes, Company E, and Lieutenant Wheeler, Company I, all acquitted themselves in a becoming and praise-worthy manner. Captains Hoffman and Flood, senior line officers and acting field officers, were especially useful in that capacity. Captain Thistlewood, of Company E, after being severely wour two-pounder guns buried at Macon. John H. Booth Corporal 4th Ohio V. C. Captain W. W. Shoemaker First on the works at Selma, April second. Instantly killed. Hoffman Captain 98th Illinois Lieut.-Colonel E. Kitchell.   Flood Captain 98th Illinois Lieut.-Colonel E. Kitchell.   N. B. Thistlewood Captain 98th Illinois Lieut.-Col
1 2