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The Daily Dispatch: May 4, 1861., [Electronic resource] 6 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army 1 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 14, 1862., [Electronic resource] 1 1 Browse Search
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J. William Jones, Christ in the camp, or religion in Lee's army, Chapter 1: religious elements in the army. (search)
ne of the editors of the North Carolina Presbyterian, is the captain of the Thomasville Rifles, which company has offered its services to the State. A letter from Richmond, Virginia, states that the Rev. George Woodbridge, D. D., pastor of the Monumental (P. E.) Church, and a graduate of West Point, has been busily engaged for several nights drilling two volunteer companies. The Rev. Dr. Wilmer, pastor of the Emanuel Church, near Richmond, is the captain of a military company. The Rev. Moses Hoge, D. D., is a member of the Home Guard. Rev. Dr. A. E. Dickinson, who had been for several years superintendent of the Virginia Baptist colportage board, and who in the early days of the war saw the necessity for this work, and promptly sent his band of trained colporters to the army and the hospitals, thus writes in the Religious Herald. There never was a more inviting field for colportage effort than that now afforded by the large armies that are being stationed at various poin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
mongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and more of Judges—amongst them Trimble, of the United States Supreme Court; Coalter, Allen, Anderson, and Burks, of the Court of Appeals of Virginia; twelve or more college presidents, and amongst them Moses Hoge and Archibald Alexander, of Hampden-Sidney, James Priestly, of Cumberland College, Tennessee, and G. A. Baxter and Henry Ruffner (who presided here), and Socrates Maupin, of the University of Virginia. These are but a few of those who here garnered the learning that shed so gracious a light in the after-time on them, their country, and their Alma Mater. And could I pause to speak of those who became valiant leaders of men in battle I could name many a noble soldier whose eye greets mine
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), A Memorial. (search)
led in Frederick county, Va., in 1736, on the domain of Thomas Lord Fairfax, of Colonial memory. His grandfather was Dr. Moses Hoge, President of Hampden-Sidney College, one of the most eminent among great and good ministers, who have so richly blese late Rev. W. J. Hoge, D. D., and the elder the late Rev. Moses D. Hoge, D. D., of this city. The youngest son of Dr. Moses Hoge, of Hampden-Sidney College, was Dr. Thomas P. Hoge, the only one of his four sons who did not become a minister of ths a peculiar propriety in selecting him as the representative of the University on that occasion, as his grandfather, Dr. Moses Hoge, was a member of the first class on which degrees were conferred by that institution (successively known as Liberty Hversity), one hundred years before. His forty-fifth anniversary. In February, 1890, the forty-fifth anniversary of Dr. Hoge's pastorate being near at hand, the session of his church made arrangements for a public celebration of the day (27th),
Dr. Hoge. The Philadelphia Presbyterian, in view of the approaching meeting of the General Assembly of the Presbyterian Church in that city, instate that the Southern members shall not be permitted to come there and sow their "traitorous doctrines" at Northern firesides. The Presbyterian is especially exercised with reference to Dr. Heen, of this city. It says it wants no such man as "Moses Hoge, of Richmond," there. We presume not. The Canaanites of old time wanted no "Moses" among them. Let us inform the Presbyterian that Dr. Hoge has no intention of going to the "City of Brotherly Hate." He is at present serving an a private in the ranks of thnform the Presbyterian that Dr. Hoge has no intention of going to the "City of Brotherly Hate." He is at present serving an a private in the ranks of the Virginia Army, as are others of our clergy. --What must be the cause which brings such men — divines of the greatest eminence and virtue — to volunteer as private in the rank
The Christian Statesmen. This is the title of the sermon delivered by Rev. Moses Hoge, D. D., on the death of the late Judge Hemphill, and is marked by the characteristic vigor, discrimination and eloquence of its author. It rebukes in manly and stirring tones the vices of public men, and shows from the example of all history, that "righteousness exalted a nation." The sermon was published at the request of a large number of members of Congress, and will be read with universal admiration. Upon the text, "Righteousness exalted a nation," we have also in pamphlet form an admirable sermon from the learned Bishop Verot, Vicar Apostolic of Florida. In this sermon the domestic institutions of the South are vindicated in a masterly manner, and the duties of masters to their servants pointed out with equal cogency and fearlessness. The sermon is especially explicit and emphatic upon the stern and solemn responsibility of Christian masters for the religious and moral training of t