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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 36 0 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 15 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 13 1 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
Pickens and War-vessels on the Confederate works folly of Hollins on the Mississippi, 113. naval engagement at Southwest Paer, on the 12th of October, and was first announced by Captain Hollins, an old officer of the National navy, whose merits werdoned his flag, in May, 1861, soon learned to their cost. Hollins startled the public with a telegraphic dispatch to his empo casualties on our side. It was a complete success. --Hollins. The official account of this affair showed the following facts: J. S. Hollins was placed in command of a peculiarly shaped iron-clad vessel called a ram, and named Manassas. At abwhat effect was not known until some time afterward. J. S. Hollins. A signal of danger had been given to the other vessned to the ship and saved her. The fire-rafts sent down by Hollins were harmless, and at ten o'clock the Confederate Commodor great victory to Richmond. The only damages inflicted by Hollins were slight bruises on the coal schooner, sinking a large
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 9: events at Nashville, Columbus, New Madrid, Island number10, and Pea Ridge. (search)
ed at Columbus March 3, 1862. it appeared before New Madrid. Pope found the post occupied by five regiments of infantry and several companies of artillery, with Hollins's flotilla on the river. Satisfied that he could accomplish very little with his light artillery, he encamped out of range of the gun-boats, and sent Colonel Bisand infantry, besides artillery, within the works in front of Pope, commanded by Generals McCown, Stuart, and Gantt. Meanwhile, three gun-boats had been added to Hollins's flotilla. Fearing the Confederates might be re-enforced from below, Pope sent Colonel J. B. Plummer, of the Eleventh Missouri, to Point Pleasant, ten or tweld twenty miles by railway, and dragged on trucks (such as is delineated in the engraving) twenty miles farther, over a miry road most of the way. On that work and Hollins's flotilla he at once opened a vigorous cannonade and bombardment. March 13. They replied with equal vigor, but in the course of a few hours three of the cannon
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 11: operations in Southern Tennessee and Northern Mississippi and Alabama. (search)
r from above. Jeff. Thompson was there, with about three thousand troops, and Hollins had collected there a considerable flotilla of gun-boats. The siege of Forts begun by Foote with his mortar-boats on the 14th of April, and he soon drove Hollins to shelter below the fort. General Pope, whose troops had landed on the Arkanvices with Dupont at Port Royal we have already observed. See page 117. Hollins, meanwhile, had reformed his flotilla, and early in the morning of the 10th Mver banks, three on the eastern and four on the western side of the stream. Hollins's largest gun-boat (McRea), finished with a sharp iron prow, started for the mup the river. The Confederate fleet, It consisted of the General Van Dorn (Hollins's flagship), General Price, General Bragg, General Lovell, Little Rebel, Jeff.er, and General Beauregard. now commanded by Commodore Montgomery, in place of Hollins, was then lying on the Arkansas shore, opposite Memphis, with steam up, and re
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 13: the capture of New Orleans. (search)
ten thousand men, which the newspapers magnified, The Louisiana. for the purpose of alarming the Nationals and strengthening the faith of the people. The New Orleans Picayune of April 5 said, We have 32,000 infantry, and as many more quartered ia the neighborhood. In discipline and drill they are far superior to the Yankees. We have two very able and active generals, who possess our entire confidence-General Mansfield Lovell and Brigadier-General Ruggles. For Commodore, we have old Hollins — a Nelson in his way. That faith in the defenses of the city was very strong, for they believed them to be impregnable. Never doubting that impregnability, the citizens continued their occupations as usual. One of the journals boastingly said, Our only fear is, that the northern invaders may not appear. We have made such extensive preparations to receive them, that it were vexatious if their invincible armada escapes the fate we have in store for it. New Orleans Picayune, April 5,
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
ram Manassas, at that time one of the improvised squadron of Commodore Hollins, late of the U. S. Navy. The Richmond's crew flew to theirw (but in fact partly disabled), and then drifted away. Commodore J. S. Hollins, C. S. N. Had the Richmond stood up the river until dayl determined that nothing of her should fall into the hands of Commodore Hollins, and he therefore ordered that a slow match should be placed prise, and because the most extravagant reports had been spread by Hollins about the force he had in rams and fire-rafts, was all folly. Sped off three pieces of her planking; there were no firerafts, and Hollins' squadron was all a sham. His gunboats were nothing more than fraect of great congratulation to them that they were out of reach of Hollins, his rams and his fire-rafts; the very enemies they had been sent er to subdue. New Orleans was illuminated on this occasion, and Hollins was feted as if he had won a great victory. Perhaps this fiasco
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Memphis, capture of (search)
confronted at Chickasaw Bluffs, 80 miles above that city, by a Confederate flotilla under Capt. J. S. Hollins and 3,000 troops under Gen. Jeff. M. Thompson, who occupied a military work on the bluffsr. On April 14, 1862, Foote began a siege of Fort Pillow with his mortar-boats, and soon drove Hollins to the shelter of that work. Pope, whose troops had landed on the Arkansas shore, was unable t H. Davis on account of the painfulness of a wound he had received at Fort Donelson. On May 10 Hollins attacked Davis, but was repulsed, notwithstanding he was aided by the heavy guns of Fort Pillow squadron, commanded by Col. Charles Ellet, Jr., joined Davis's flotilla and prepared to attack Hollins. The Confederates, having just heard of the flight of Beauregard from Corinth, which uncoveredly evacuated Fort Pillow (June 4) and fled down the river in transports to Memphis, followed by Hollins's flotilla. On June 6 the National flotilla won a victory over the Confederate squadron in fro
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing), Southwest pass, engagement at (search)
ass of the Mississippi River, composed of the steamer Richmond, sloops-of-war Vincennes and Preble, and steam-tender Water-witch, commanded by Capt. J. Pope. J. S. Hollins, formerly of the United States navy, was there in command of the Manassas, a Confederate ram. About 4 A. M. on Oct. 12, this ram appeared suddenly close to theily, the match intended to explode her magazine went out, and her crew returned to her. the Richmond and Vincennes had grounded, and for a while were bombarded by Hollins. He also sent down fire-rafts to burn them, but did not succeed. Hollins was soon driven up the river. The only damage he had done to the squadron was to slighmond and Vincennes had grounded, and for a while were bombarded by Hollins. He also sent down fire-rafts to burn them, but did not succeed. Hollins was soon driven up the river. The only damage he had done to the squadron was to slightly injure a coaling-schooner, sink a large boat, and pierce a hole in the side of the Richmond.