hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Knight's Mechanical Encyclopedia (ed. Knight) 110 0 Browse Search
Thomas Wentworth Higginson, Atlantic Essays 42 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 1, Colonial and Revolutionary Literature: Early National Literature: Part I (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 24 0 Browse Search
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard) 16 0 Browse Search
Cambridge History of American Literature: volume 2 (ed. Trent, William Peterfield, 1862-1939., Erskine, John, 1879-1951., Sherman, Stuart Pratt, 1881-1926., Van Doren, Carl, 1885-1950.) 16 0 Browse Search
James Russell Lowell, Among my books 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 14 0 Browse Search
Frank Preston Stearns, Cambridge Sketches 12 0 Browse Search
Edward L. Pierce, Memoir and letters of Charles Sumner: volume 2 12 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: March 12, 1861., [Electronic resource] 12 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2. You can also browse the collection for Homer or search for Homer in all documents.

Your search returned 3 results in 3 document sections:

Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, Capital punishment (1855) (search)
is another point. If this idea of hanging men, for example, is correct, then why do you not make your executions as public as possible? Why do you not hang men at the centre of the Common? Our fathers did it. They hung their people under the great tree. They hung them for example, and of course they wished everybody to see it. They hung men upon the Neck, and crowds went out to see it. If example is the object, the sight of punishment would seem to be essential to its full effect. Why, Homer tells us, two thousand years ago, that a thing seen has double the weight of a thing heard. Everybody knows that a child will recollect what he sees ten times as well as what he hears. You know that in old times (not to make a laugh of it), in Connecticut, they used to take the children to the line of the town, and there give them a whipping, in order that they might remember the bounds of their township by that spot. Now, there are fourteen States in the Union that have made executions
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The Chinese (1870). (search)
now it is only a sentiment that prevents; but that sentiment is as rigid as iron and inexorable as fate. Supply and demand, therefore, are to be understood, with a qualification. The ideas of the supply are a most important element in the calculation. What are the ideas of the supply ? These regulate his wages. The Chinaman works cheap because he is a barbarian, and seeks gratification of only the lowest, the most inevitable wants. The American demands more because the ages,--because Homer and Plato, Egypt and Rome, Luther and Shakspeare, Cromwell and Washington, the printing-press and the telegraph, the ballot-box and the Bible,--have made him ten times as much a man. Bring the Chinese to us slowly, naturally, and we shall soon lift him to the level of the same artificial and civilized wants that we feel. Then capitalist and laborer will both be equally helped. Fill our industrial channels with imported millions, and you choke them ruinously. They who seek to flood us, ar
Wendell Phillips, Theodore C. Pease, Speeches, Lectures and Letters of Wendell Phillips: Volume 2, The lost arts (1838). (search)
rs. Take poetry, painting, sculpture, architecture, the drama, and almost everything in works of any form that relates to beauty, --with regard to that whole sweep, the modern world gilds it with its admiration of the beautiful. Take the very phrases that we use. Th) artist says he wishes to go to Rome. For what? To study the masters. Well, all the masters have been in their graves several hundred years. We are all pupils. You tell the poet, Sir, that line of yours would remind one of Homer, and he is crazy. Stand in front of a painting, in the hearing of the artist, and compare its coloring to that of Titian or Raphael, and he remembers you forever. I remember once standing in front of a bit of marble carved by Powers, a Vermonter who had a matchless, instinctive love of art, and perception of beauty. I said to an Italian standing with me, Well, now, that seems to me to be perfection. Perfection! --was his answer, shrugging his shoulders,--Why, sir, that reminds you of Phi