hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
View all matching documents...

Your search returned 4,933 results in 240 document sections:

... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ...
dy. The rebel army was divided into three great corps: Hardee's on the right, Hood in the centre, and Polk on the left. All the reinforcements brought up from Mobescaped officer. General Polk holds their right, corresponding to our left, General Hood the centre, and General Hardee the left. We have taken some three or four hand, which corresponds with estimates furnished by our scouts. We have in front Hood's and Hardee's corps, with about twenty thousand of Polk's army commanded by then in person. Among the General officers holding commands, are Johnston, Hardee, Hood, Stevenson, Pat Cleburne and Gibson, Bates and Polk. Major Landgraeber's rep the entire Yankee army and the divisions of Hindman, Stevenson, and Stewart, of Hood's corps — these troops composing the right wing of our army. The enemy's force ker's corps, which had held the advance on the march, engaged with the rebel General Hood's corps. Early in the forenoon, while the General and his staff were inspec
lank movement of any force that might come up from Bainbridge, where Hood's army had but just crossed the Tennessee river, and also to enable k by Forrest from Barlow Station, to reinforce Roddy and protect General Hood's trains. At Leighton I learned that Hood had commenced crossHood had commenced crossing the river at Bainbridge on Sunday morning, and finished on Tuesday evening, marching at once towards Corinth. This railroad had never beeEngineers, who commanded the train, that a large supply train of General Hood's, bound from Barton Station to Tuscumbia, was ahead. Early nrs, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry, who had been badly wounded at Franklin. I left a tent wters were colored United States soldiers of the garrison captured by Hood at Dalton — these came back with us. We returned via Tollgate andlroad for twenty miles near and above Okalona. I do not think General Hood brought across the Tennessee river, at Bainbridge, more than twe
een sent back by Forrest from Barlow Station, to reinforce Roddy and protect General Hood's trains. At Leighton I learned that Hood had commenced crossing the riveHood had commenced crossing the river at Bainbridge on Sunday morning, and finished on Tuesday evening, marching at once towards Corinth. This railroad had never been in operation east of Cane Creek, tobb, of the Engineers, who commanded the train, that a large supply train of General Hood's, bound from Barton Station to Tuscumbia, was ahead. Early next morning ount prisoners, and started back. In one of the wagons was Colonel McCrosky, of Hood's infantry, who had been badly wounded at Franklin. I left a tent with him, somof the teamsters were colored United States soldiers of the garrison captured by Hood at Dalton — these came back with us. We returned via Tollgate and the old Miloyed the railroad for twenty miles near and above Okalona. I do not think General Hood brought across the Tennessee river, at Bainbridge, more than twelve thousand
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore), Doc. 19. the siege of Suffolk, Virginia. (search)
thousand; that he had maps, plans, and a statement of my force, and that General Hill would co-operate. On the eleventh, Hood's division followed up my cavalry returning from Blackwater on the South Quay roads, and about four P. M. captured, withoubly forty thousand is a safe estimate; and he had associated with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflecteany great operation, since Longstreet had two railways. Among the division commanders were Lieutenant-Generals Hill and Hood, French, Picket, &c. Major-General Anderson was not present, although so reported often — troops claimed to be under some is on the ground. They expect to get in your rear, have exact drawings of all your works, and know your force and means. Hood's division is the largest of all. They are building three bridges on the Blackwater, and have a large pontoon train. E. L.
pon Little Washington, and sent those troops to Suffolk. He followed soon after with the remainder of his command. The rebel force in North Carolina was estimated by General Foster as very large, and in my judgment far above the real numbers. If his estimate was correct, there must have been with Longstreet, after the concentration, more than fifty thousand men. Probably forty thousand is a safe estimate; and he had associated with him such able West Pointers as Lieutenant-Generals Hill, Hood and Anderson, and Major-Generals Picket, French and Garnett, &c. The Petersburg Express of the fifteenth of April reflected the Confederate expectations in regard to Longstreet's army, in the following: Our people are buoyant and hopeful, as they ought to be. We have in that direction as gallant an army as was ever mustered under any sun, and commanded by an officer who has won laurels in every engagement, from the first Manassas to that at Fredericksburg. Such an army, commanded by su
Telegrams. The following telegrams reflect much light upon the campaign: Norfolk, April 10, 1863. Major-General Peck: I have a man just in. He says that Longstreet has at least 60,000 men, and will attack you as soon as his material is on the ground. They expect to get in your rear, have exact drawings of all your works, and know your force and means. Hood's division is the largest of all. They are building three bridges on the Blackwater, and have a large pontoon train. E. L. Viele. Brig.-General. Norfolk, April 10, 1863. Major-General Peck: A letter I am reading, written on the train, corroborates what I have telegraphed to you to-day. The date is April seventh--says: We are massing large bodies of troops on the Blackwater. Have pontoon bridges. Our generals intend to attack Suffolk. (Signed) E. L. Viele, Brig.-General. Norfolk, April 10, 1863. Major-General Peck: Another letter says, that a Major-General, Lee's right hand man, was down on the Blackwa
be reacted. Our cavalry and our people will harass and destroy his army as did the Cossacks that of Napoleon; and the Yankee General, like him, will escape with only a body-guard. How can this be the most speedily effected? By the absentees of Hood's army returning to their posts; and will they not? Can they see the banished exiles; can they hear the wail of their suffering countrywomen and children and not come? By what influence they are made to stay away it is not necessary to speak. Iforty-five left. The boys--God bless the boys — are, as rapidly as they become old enough, going to the field. The city of Macon is filled with stores, sick and wounded. It must not be abandoned, but when the enemy come, instead of calling upon Hood's army for defence, the old men must fight, and when the enemy is driven beyond Chattanooga, they too can join in the general rejoicing. Your prisoners are kept as a sort of Yankee capital. I have heard that one of their Generals said that their
ord to be whipped, and such being the case, General Hood was unhappy in supposing that he could worsoops are amazed at the reckless manner in which Hood has led his troops against the Yankees, They avy thing has so far progressed favorably. General Hood, true to his word, is holding on to Atlantaerman wants nothing better than an assault, and Hood will be sure to get hurt, as he was in all his thousand prophets are wrong in their forecast. Hood lacks either discernment or pugnacity. Not the be retreating, and is undoubtedly doing so, if Hood has any military sagacity. 10 A. M.--In Jonee army in Atlanta, and we found the report that Hood was subsisting his troops from hand to mouth, ssand, has been reduced nearly one half, leaving Hood not over forty-eight thousand regular troops ofdoned during the night of September first; that Hood had blown up his ammunition-trains, which accouby your co-operation his defeat became a rout. Hood, hearing the news, blew up his ammunition train[43 more...]
-noon. Despatch about Wilson just received. Hood is now crossing Coosa river, twelve miles belowgoing south. If there is any way of getting at Hood's Army I would prefer that; but I must trust toe through Georgia, smashing things, to the sea. Hood may turn into Tennessee and Kentucky, but I belg his army in position in the meantime to watch Hood. Becoming satisfied that Hood had moved westware, with instructions to watch the movements of Hood and retard his advance, but not to risk a gener the fifteenth December General Thomas attacked Hood in position, and, in a battle lasting two days,that distinguished officer's judgment. After Hood's defeat at Nashville he retreated, closely purman at Savannah — his army entirely foot-loose, Hood being then before Nashville, Tennessee, the Souved information of the defeat and utter rout of Hood's army by General Thomas, and that, owing to thwill move from there eastward, in cooperation. Hood's army has been terribly reduced by the severe [21 more...]
arrisons, and our whole attention turned toward Hood's movements in Northern Georgia. On the twelf Dalton, and a summons to surrender, signed by Hood in person, was sent in to Colonel Johnson, Fort arrive and get into a position to meet him. Hood's plans had now become evident, and from informurces confirmed the reported strength stated of Hood's army to be from forty to forty-five thousand where it went into camp. The possibility of Hood's forces following General Sherman was now at ay, and dispute the possession of Tennessee with Hood's army. The enemy followed closely after Genrs already reported, makes an aggregate loss to Hood's army of six thousand two hundred and fifty-twjected, I determined to continue the pursuit of Hood's shattered forces, and for this purpose decidef forty-two and a half miles. The pursuit of Hood's retreating army was discontinued by my main fnd his command is accorded the credit of giving Hood's army the last blow of the campaign, at a dist[17 more...]
... 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 ...