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Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 36: Battle of Ezra Church (search)
teries and make all the trenches secure against Hood's known impulsiveness; to bring to the front abound by extending his right till he had severed Hood's southern railroad connections, as he had justould be long enough to enable me to get hold of Hood's railroad there before Hood could extend his tHood could extend his trenches. Sherman, not expecting an attack, said that there would be little risk in my moving strae country, and already having had experience of Hood's enterprise, I thought that we should be attac suggestion, Sherman said he did not think that Hood would trouble me, but was willing I should deplto command the army corps which had been led by Hood before his promotion. S. D. Lee's assumption of his command was of the same date as mine. Hood, as soon as he divined Sherman's design of threatezra Church, he would find Jackson's cavalry. Hood also instructed Stewart to proceed with two diny prisoners. After the battle of Ezra Church, Hood confined himself to the defensive as long as we[1 more...]
d come back to us after the healing of his Resaca wound. Hood then tried Sherman's cavalry plan on a larger scale. Forreoga with hope of drawing Sherman away from Atlanta, so that Hood could fall on his rear with his main army. But these effortually thwarted by Sherman as Sherman's cavalry had been by Hood.. Hood at last acknowledged that he could not anywhere in e, the work of extending our line near Atlanta had gone on. Hood's intrenchments had followed suit, ever protecting his railield and Palmer went to my right, Bate and Cleburne went to Hood's left. Without too much detour, Sherman put upon Schofid destruction. This was not sufficient, however, to induce Hood to surrender. On August 16th, Sherman, being resolved to attack Hood's railway lines, issued his orders for the following movements: First: the Twentieth Corps was sent back to forngines on the Macon road all day, and knew well enough that Hood was sending troops. The principal object of my move was pl
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 37: Battle of Lovejoy's Station and capture of Atlanta (search)
ee bridge, hearing the explosions occasioned by Hood's attempted destruction of his depots and loadeot to attempt at this time a further pursuit of Hood's army, but slowly and deliberately to move bacprobably it was a railway station in Alabama on Hood's flank after he had reached his new position. supplies and destroy his communications; so General Hood recalled him. That chassez of the Confednds on account of a truce entered into between Hood and Sherman; but the truce was interpreted by HHood to be local, and to apply only to the roads leading in the vicinity of the Rough and Ready Statiner, of his staff, with a guard of 100 men, and Hood sent there also Major Wm. Clare, inspector geneactive hostility. President Davis's visit to Hood's army was an interesting event. General Shermy as September 25th. The Confederate record at Hood's headquarters reads: President Davis, accomrrespondence was carried on between Sherman and Hood. That correspondence showed Sherman master of [8 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 39: General Hood's northward march; Sherman in pursuit; battle of Allatoona (search)
upon what Hood might do. September 29, 1864, Hood left his position near Palmetto, Ga., putting Br to Fairburn, as the case may call for; and if Hood has crossed the Chattahoochee with two corps to A. A. G. As soon as Sherman found out what Hood was undertaking, he set his whole force in moti breakup of the railroad and telegraph lines by Hood's men, we were obliged to depend upon day and nng the bridge across the Etowah, was brought to Hood, then near Lost Mountain, he continued his marcen. Respectfully, your obedient servant, J. B. Hood, General. Colonel Wever's reply is worthy of record, addressed the same date to General Hood: Your communication of this date just r our cavalry from the direction of Kingston. Hood decided, doubtless, after Wever's rejoinder, noximity to Hood's army, and we thought then that Hood would delay with hope of engaging our forces piision, under General Charles R. Woods, ran upon Hood's rear guard at Ship's Gap. We there capture[11 more...]
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 40: return to Atlanta; the March to the sea; Battle of Griswoldville, ga. (search)
.... I am clearly of the opinion that the best results will follow my contemplated movement through Georgia. Grant's reply is: Your dispatch of 9 A. M. yesterday just received. ... I do not see that you can withdraw from where you are to follow Hood without giving up all we have gained in the territory; I say, then, go on as you propose. Our sick in increasing numbers before the campaign, but proportionately diminishing during Hood's raid, were brought together at Rome and Atlanta. While Hood's raid, were brought together at Rome and Atlanta. While we rested, they were carefully removed to Chattanooga and Nashville; also surplus stores of every kind that had accumulated at Atlanta were sent back as fast as possible. General Corse acted in Rome in this respect as did our Chief Quartermaster at Atlanta. Then, on November 10th, after he had demolished the storehouses, he evacuated Rome and commenced his march toward Atlanta. During November 12th the troops with me destroyed all the railroad from Big Shanty forward to the Chattahoochee R
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 41: the march to the sea; capture of Fort McAllister and Savannah (search)
said that he would make little effort to restrain his army, burning to avenge a great National wrong, which they attributed to Savannah and other large cities so prominent in dragging our country into civil war. He finished by inclosing a copy of Hood's demand for the surrender of Resaca, where Hood promised no quarter. Hardee's reply, of the same date, is dignified. He showed Sherman's idea of complete investment to be incorrect, for there was one channel beyond the Savannah, leading to ChHood promised no quarter. Hardee's reply, of the same date, is dignified. He showed Sherman's idea of complete investment to be incorrect, for there was one channel beyond the Savannah, leading to Charleston, not yet closed. Your demand for the surrender of Savannah and its dependent forts is refused. He closed with these words: I have hitherto conducted the military operations intrusted to my direction in direct accordance with the rules of civilized warfare, and I should deeply regret the adoption of any course by you that may force me to deviate from them in the future. As soon as Hardee's reply reached Sherman he let us go on with our preparations for assaulting the works. Slocum
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 43: march through the Carolinas; the taking of Columbia (search)
he Confederates had evacuated Charleston. Gillmore's troops had entered the city, and captured a large amount of artillery and other stores. This was good news, brought by the negroes, who always enjoyed telling us such things, but it indicated to me an increased opposition to our advance; for already we were hearing not only of Hardee drawing in his various garrisons, but of Bragg, Cheatham, and Stephen D. Lee. We then knew that the remnants which Thomas and Schofield had not destroyed of Hood's army at Nashville, Tenn., as well as the troops from Augusta, Ga., were hastening to strengthen Hardee's resistance to our advance. We had about the same experience day after day with ever increasing obstacles, till we came near what is called Lynch's Creek, in ordinary times a stream not to exceed 200 feet; but when we approached, owing to the recent freshet, the creek overflowed its banks, and so, though not deep, it spread over a wide stretch of country, covering in extent at least a
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 2, Chapter 45: March through the Carolinas; the Battle of Bentonville; Johnston's surrender (search)
7653 Aggregate loss2,343 Sherman gave this summary: Wide discrepancies exist in these figures. For instance, Slocum accounts for 338 prisoners captured, and Howard for 1,287, making 1,625 in all to Johnston's 653, a difference of 872. I have always accorded to Johnston due credit for boldness in his attack on our exposed flank at Bentonville, but I think that he understated his strength, and doubt at the time whether he gave accurate returns from his miscellaneous army, collected from Hood, Bragg, Hardee, Lee, and Hampton. With this knowledge now possessed of his small force, of course I committed an error in not overwhelming Johnston's army on March 21, 1865. Hardee is presented as particularly gallant in all of the later charges of the battle of Bentonville, at one time leading his men in person straight over one of Slocum's barricades. When Hardee was commandant of cadets at West Point, I was one of the officers associated with him and was very intimate with his family.
400, 403, 404, 407, 421, 429, 580, 581. Hill, D. H., I, 141, 231, 232, 235, 275, 279-281, 284, 287, 290, 293, 294, 297, 299, 332. Hill, Ellas, II, 387. Hillhouse, John, 1, 67. Hillhouse, Mrs. John, I, 67. Hipp, Charles, I1, 22, 23. Hiscock, Rev., 11, 316. Hitchcock, Henry, II, 159. Hitchcock, Roswell G., I, 128. Hodder, Mr., II, 543. Hoffman, Ernest F., I, 365, 376, 491. Holabird, S. B., I, 101. Holmes, Freeland S., I, 37. Holmes, William 1R., I, 151. Hood, J. B., I, 240, 287, 290, 294, 332, 426, 510, 518, 520, 528, 529, 532-534, 539, 542, 543, 546, 549, 572, 575, 578, 598, 604, 605, 607, 609, 612; II, 7, 11, 14, 16-18, 21, 26, 28, 29, 34, 41, 47, 48, 50, 52, 55, 57, 63-66, 69, 93, 151. Hooker, Joseph, 1, 172, 192, 220, 221, 230, 235, 236, 242, 248, 262, 264, 265, 268, 272, 277, 281-284, 289, 2 290, 292-295, 302, 303, 311, 317, 318, 322, 326, 329, 333, 342, 343, 347, 348, 350, 352-354, 356-362, 365-369, 373-376, 379, 381-395, 397, 398, 450, 452
noticed the operations of Gen. Jackson's command, including Ewell's division, in the Shenandoah Valley, and seen how successful they were in diverting the army of McDowell at Fredericksburg from uniting with that of McClellan. It was now important to summon the force to the defence of Richmond, and to do so with secrecy and dispatch. To mask his withdrawal from the Valley at the proper time, Jackson, after the defeat of Fremont and Shields, was reinforced by Whiting's division, composed of Hood's Texas brigade, and his own, under Colonel Law, from Richmond, and that of Lawton from the South. The deception succeeded even beyond expectation; and there is reason to suppose that McClellan remained in profound ignorance of Jackson's movement until his apparition on the lines of Richmond. According to Lee's general order of battle, Gen. Jackson was to march from Ashland on the 25th of June, in the direction of Slash Church, encamping for the night west of the Central railroad, and to
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